Author Topic: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets  (Read 36964 times)

arebelspy

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Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« on: January 27, 2015, 12:44:24 PM »
Does anyone know of an organization that you can pay to take your pets and they guarantee placement for them?

All of the places I find will do their best, but often are forced to euthanize. 

If we were willing to pay someone to take our pets (and pay for their care), how could I go about finding that?
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dbunny

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2015, 12:52:46 PM »
I would be nervous about offering to pay someone to take your pet. They could just be a random person looking to make a dollar and they end up taking them to one of the shelters that euthanizes them. I have never heard of an organization that will take payment to take your pet, but you could ask about paying for your pet's adoption fee in advance to increase their chance of being adopted.

There are many strictly 'no kill' animal shelters but they are usually local so you might just have to increase your search area.



Spondulix

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2015, 12:54:19 PM »
I second a no-kill shelter. There should be no fee, and some will even have anonymous dropoff locations.

V

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2015, 12:55:02 PM »
I went through this a few years ago.  The problem with that is that most organizations I found will actually pay to help you keep them, but getting them to take them is extremely difficult.  Most rescue groups will not have them euthanized, but they cannot guarantee you that your pet will stay in a home for the rest of their life.  It's a hard place to be in and I'm sorry you are going through it.  your best bet would be to find a family member or friend.  That would probably be the only way to guarantee they find a forever home.  It is very difficult to get an animal in a rescue group, but it can be done.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2015, 12:58:05 PM »
Google "No Kill Shelter" or "No Kill Rescue".  They won't normally let you pay the cost directly, but you can donate an equivalent as long as you want to. (E.g., until the pet is adopted.)

My senior dog came to me after two years in a foster home, with a rescue group that had a no kill policy.

 

Caoineag

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2015, 01:01:18 PM »
Local rescue groups usually will. Ours is the Dumb Friends League but they are only in my area. If your pet is a specific breed, you might be able to find a breed specific group that could help you out.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2015, 01:03:09 PM »
...but you could ask about paying for your pet's adoption fee in advance to increase their chance of being adopted.

The problem with this is that people generally value their pets more if they have to pay for them. Free pets are disposable, which is part of the reason for adoption fees. Your pet may get adopted faster, but not necessarily in a stable forever environment.

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2015, 01:03:42 PM »
Most of our no kill shelters in the area were forced to become kill during the recession for financial reasons.

I have two cats, and I'd prefer to pay a company that will rehome them together, versus a shelter where that's very unlikely, even if it costs a lot versus the latter option.

Started with all friends and family; unfortunately almost all are allergic.
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startingsmall

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2015, 01:23:38 PM »
In some parts of the country, no-kill shelters will be an option. In many areas, though (especially low-income or rural areas), they are already filled to capacity and rarely in a position to accept owner surrenders.   If they happen to be purebred dogs, your best bet is to contact a breed-specific rescue group.

EllieStan

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2015, 01:25:50 PM »
Does anyone know of an organization that you can pay to take your pets and they guarantee placement for them?

All of the places I find will do their best, but often are forced to euthanize. 

If we were willing to pay someone to take our pets (and pay for their care), how could I go about finding that?

Is there no way you could find them a new home, yourself ? This is not meant to be judgemental. I've had to do this with my dog. I didn't want to give him to a random person though, so I ''sold'' him for 300$ (but gave over $500 worth of dog food, crates, travel accessories and toys) and in the ad, I asked to meet the potential new family first, to evaluate how they interacted with my dog. I turned down a ''family'' who insisted on negociating the dog's price and refused to see the dog first. Fortunately, about a week later I found a lovely couple who had just retired (plenty of time ahead of them), they had already experienced living with a dog of the same breed and they had a huge backyard (I didn't). They also understood the money I asked was not because I was being greedy, but rather because it allowed me to be selective. 

It's not always easy to find home for adult cats, but it's worth trying. Ask your family and friends and they can use social media to extend your search. They might know someone who would gladly adopt/rescue your cats. This is how I adopted 2 of mine. :)

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2015, 01:26:58 PM »
I'm trying/working on that, but it's not going well, thus my question.  I'd much rather find a home for them myself.
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southern granny

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2015, 01:33:04 PM »
The no kill shelters will normally have a waiting list.  When we were forced to rehome a cat due to a family members allergies, we were on a waiting list for at least eight months.  I second what someone else said about being careful when offering money when the money may be accepted, but the cat not properly cared for.

horsepoor

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2015, 01:35:02 PM »
I wonder if you could charge an adoption fee, but then offer a care and feeding stipend of a certain amount, exceeding the adoption fee, that the new owner could use over time.  E.g. a credit at a local vet's office to cover a couple years' worth of routine veterinary care, and maybe pay for an auto-delivery of food for a specified time period.

This way, the adopter doesn't have a motivation for getting the animal for nefarious reasons or profit.  Still no guarantees, but probably better than offering cash up front, and provides some assurance that the animal will receive decent care.

Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2015, 01:37:56 PM »
The Reno Humane Society has been no kill since 2007. They did not euthanize during the recession.  There is no waiting list. I have been volunteering there for years.  They adopt out over 10,000 pets per year.  They do this by holding monthly big events & they also work with other local rescue groups. The cost is $25/per animal.  Also when my MIL died we already had 4 dogs so could not take hers-over the legal limit.  We found a friend of hers that would take the dog if we paid for everything because she could not afford it. We went over for 8 years weekly to visit until it died.  Maybe you could find someone in this situation. May I ask why they need new homes?

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2015, 01:46:53 PM »
The Reno Humane Society has been no kill since 2007. They did not euthanize during the recession.  There is no waiting list. I have been volunteering there for years.  They adopt out over 10,000 pets per year.  They do this by holding monthly big events & they also work with other local rescue groups. The cost is $25/per animal.

Can they rehome two adult cats together?  Or will they be split up?

Also when my MIL died we already had 4 dogs so could not take hers-over the legal limit.  We found a friend of hers that would take the dog if we paid for everything because she could not afford it. We went over for 8 years weekly to visit until it died.  Maybe you could find someone in this situation.

That would be nice.
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Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2015, 01:57:06 PM »
They will rehome them together. Recently they rehomed an old cat & old dog that had been together for 8 years.  They were even in the same room at the shelter. Washoe Co is the safest place in the nation to be a homeless cat/dog. 

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2015, 02:01:43 PM »
They will rehome them together. Recently they rehomed an old cat & old dog that had been together for 8 years.  They were even in the same room at the shelter. Washoe Co is the safest place in the nation to be a homeless cat/dog.

Okay.  Driving them up there will be our last resort then, but I'm feeling better that will be an option.

Do they need any sort of notice/advance timing?  Thank you Cassie.
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Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2015, 02:10:04 PM »
You need an appointment because they have you fill out a questionnaire & ask a lot of questions so that they will be placed in the right home.  I guess the only thing I am not sure about is whether they will take them since you live in Vegas. Vegas does not do a good job of adopting out large # of animals & they do euthanize so I would not take them there.  Also do not give away because for example is a facility here that does experiments/medical research on animals.  A bunch of monkeys were burned alive here when some equipment was left on when no one was in the building.  They also use dogs/cats.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #18 on: January 27, 2015, 02:15:22 PM »
How old are they? How long have you had them? Why can't you keep them? Good luck. I had a similar situation with a stray cat I found starving. The cat was very friendly but the with the other pets I had at the time it was not gonna work.  Most shelters said they would have to put him to death soon after I dropped him off. Also some animal shelters will only take the animal if you live in the same community the shelter is in. I ended up finding a no-kill shelter a few towns over that bent that rule when I offered to also give a donation of $300.00 as well. It was a VERY hard decision to make and I wish the timing with this cat was better because he was a great cat. 

eostache

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2015, 02:20:31 PM »
Would Best Friends in Kanab UT take them? They are relatively close to you in Vegas.

arebelspy

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2015, 02:27:38 PM »
How old are they? How long have you had them?

6 & 7.  Since they were kittens.  Thanks for the thoughts.

Would Best Friends in Kanab UT take them? They are relatively close to you in Vegas.

I will look into that, thank you!
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Capsu78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2015, 02:42:46 PM »
Can you post something at your vet's office offering the "set only" to a good home.  Sometimes these folks come in contact with clients who have lost pets who may be interested in a "non kitten" already trained cat.   Or someone in the waiting room sees the add.  Through in a couple  "kitty physicals" to help them determine the cats are in good health.

Kwill

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2015, 07:33:25 PM »
I have two cats, and I'd prefer to pay a company that will rehome them together, versus a shelter where that's very unlikely, even if it costs a lot versus the latter option.

Started with all friends and family; unfortunately almost all are allergic.

Have you tried the pet section of Craigslist? It's in the "Community" section. I adopted my cat via Craigslist when she was two years old. Her original owner had adopted her from a shelter as a kitten and had the paperwork and so forth. The owner was expecting a baby, and she didn't feel like she could deal with the kitty litter anymore. I wanted a young adult cat because I knew I wouldn't be home enough during the day to raise a kitten.

We exchanged some emails, and I came over to get the cat and meet the family. I still send cat photos to the previous owner now and then.

If you put up a Craigslist ad, you can explain about the cats' health and age and the fact that they need to be together. Put up some adorable photos, too. It might be harder to find a home for them since they're older, but you might have a better shot of finding a home that way than putting them in a shelter.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2015, 08:50:15 PM »
Did your cats originally come from a shelter or rescue? Most will take them back and it is part of the contract.  If you got them from a kill shelter this is an issue but almost all no-kill shelters have this clause.  I volunteer at a no-kill that does not take owner surrender unless you are returning a cat you previously adopted.  It can be 10 years later even.  There is an exception though.  If you have a very compelling reason besides I don't want them anymore or they cost too much money.  If true poverty is an issue, we have a food pantry and free vet care so you can keep your cat.  With some very compelling stories (severely allergic child where medicating wasn't enough, owner having to go into a nursing home with no family or friends, domestic violence) we took an owner surrender.  If your story is compelling, consider pleading your case to the "no surrender" shelters, even if they are out of the usual geographic range.

Be aware, if the reason is allergies, they may want more info.  People lie/exaggerate about allergies a lot.  There is a big difference between I get a little sneezy and have to take claritin and I can't breathe and have to go to the ER.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2015, 06:28:58 AM »
I volunteer with a dog rescue.  We try hard not to take owner surrenders where we have to take the animal.  We just have too many animals and not enough fosters. We don't have a boarding facility, all the dogs are fostered.  We do let people sign on with us if they agree to bring the pets to our weekly adoption clinics and keep the pets until they are placed.  It usually works out pretty well.  You might try asking local rescues if this is a possibility.

Cassie

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2015, 09:59:28 AM »
Do not use Craigslist.  Many bad people use that & sell them to research facilities, etc.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #26 on: January 28, 2015, 10:39:47 AM »
I would say, rather than "completely ignore a viable option because of a few bad people," go ahead and try Craigslist but be careful. I was recently on the other end of an experience similar to Kwill's, and believe me, I was not going to let our cat go to someone who would mistreat him or turn around and sell him. We had four different people/families come and meet him, asked extensive questions about their home/life/experience with pets, and chose the family we felt was the best fit. They've even sent me a few pictures of him in his new home. It was a lot of work, but I feel comfortable with the end result.

Our backup plan was going to be a local no-kill rescue group that places animals in foster homes, rather than a shelter, until they are adopted.

Good luck to you and your wife - I know how hard this is.

LadyStache

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2015, 03:18:48 PM »
I would go with Petfinder before Craigslist. You can use it to post an ad about your pets and to find shelters in your area.

https://www.petfinder.com/
« Last Edit: January 28, 2015, 03:20:44 PM by LadyStache »

chasesfish

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2015, 05:20:15 AM »
Having a pet needs to be a choice for life.  There are too many animals and not enough homes.  Everything you're going through is a function of this challenge - the true no-kill shelters have massive waiting lists and can fill up immediately by getting the most adoptable animals out of the animal control shelters.

One other option is put an adoption listing up at the vet's office you've used.  I've seen some success that route and it is a captive and responsible audience. 

MrsPete

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2015, 06:33:50 AM »
No-kill shelters are a bit of a misnomer.  They don't kill animals themselves . . . but if the animal has been with them for X amount of time and hasn't found a home, they often will shuffle the animal to a different shelter, one that DOES put animals down. 

Ask about this before you surrender an animal.

Capsu78

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #30 on: January 29, 2015, 08:32:32 AM »
Having a pet needs to be a choice for life. 

This is a bit off topic but I had to put down our 20yo cat back in October.  While I have been through the process before, and choose to be with my pets until the end, this one hit me harder than the rest. 
I went on the internet under "pet grief" to, you know, see what was out there.  One vet chose to speak about pet ownership in a pretty funny way- basically, if you choose to be a pet owner, you will probably have to say goodbye to your pet  3-4 times over your life...unless the pet you choose is a Desert Tortoise who can live up to 150 years.  Then he will have to go through it 3-4 times!   It was the first good laugh I had on that sad day. 

Pigeon

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #31 on: January 29, 2015, 09:15:37 AM »
Quote
Having a pet needs to be a choice for life. 


Yes and no.  I volunteer with a rescue and it is infuriating how many people will try to dump their animals without much reason or any effort to find another solution.  The number of sweet young couples come in looking to get us to take Rover because the wife is pregnant...  Rover has no behavioral issues, but suppose he's not good with babies or suppose they are too busy to worry about Rover any more.  Or somebody gets a new boyfriend/girlfriend who doesn't like dogs, so Rover has got to go.  That makes me crazy and those people are jerks.

But there are people who have serious, life changing situation, that I understand.  A few years ago, when the economy was worse, we encountered people who had lost jobs and were getting evicted from their homes and were forced to move into places that wouldn't take dogs, or people whose kids have developed serious, untreatable allergies.  Yes, in some circumstances pets do need to be rehomed.

Scandium

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #32 on: January 29, 2015, 10:00:22 AM »
No-kill shelters are a bit of a misnomer.  They don't kill animals themselves . . . but if the animal has been with them for X amount of time and hasn't found a home, they often will shuffle the animal to a different shelter, one that DOES put animals down. 

Ask about this before you surrender an animal.

Yes. No-kill shelters are bunk. That means that they don't even euthanize aggressive dogs that have attacked people or similar. Which I'd argue in some cases is the humane thing to do.

And like MrsPete says they will pawn these animals off to other shelters. The no-kill places then collect all the donations since people think they are so nice and heartwarming, while the "bad evil kill shelters" gets no donations since they are obviously so mean, but still have to deal with the animals that the no-kill shelter gets rid off!

My wife was volunteering for the SPCA and this was a constant problem with fundraising. Naive people don't want to give since they're not no-kill.

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2015, 12:33:06 PM »
I placed in ad in our work classifieds for my two cats after my son developed allergies to cats.  I offered up $100/cat to the person who took them.  A nice young man, who had been thinking about getting cats, but worried a bit about the responsibility, came forward and adopted them.  He told me that the money helped him decide to take them because it offered him a little bit of cushion in a situation that otherwise made him a bit nervous.  My husband thought that I was nuts for this, but I will never regret it. 

I too believe that pets should be for life, but when you're doing 2-3 Nebulizer treatments a day with a 2 year old because he can't breath due to cats, the decision to remove them, while painful, is obvious. 

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #34 on: January 29, 2015, 01:14:56 PM »
No-kill shelters are a bit of a misnomer.  They don't kill animals themselves . . . but if the animal has been with them for X amount of time and hasn't found a home, they often will shuffle the animal to a different shelter, one that DOES put animals down. 

Ask about this before you surrender an animal.

Yes. No-kill shelters are bunk. That means that they don't even euthanize aggressive dogs that have attacked people or similar. Which I'd argue in some cases is the humane thing to do.

And like MrsPete says they will pawn these animals off to other shelters. The no-kill places then collect all the donations since people think they are so nice and heartwarming, while the "bad evil kill shelters" gets no donations since they are obviously so mean, but still have to deal with the animals that the no-kill shelter gets rid off!

My wife was volunteering for the SPCA and this was a constant problem with fundraising. Naive people don't want to give since they're not no-kill.

I really don't want to take this thread too far off track here but there are places that do "no kill" right.  I volunteer at one and I am willing to recognize the one or two downsides.  We do NOT pawn any animals off to any kill shelters and would never do that.  We do sometimes give an animal to another no-kill shelter that is better suited to its needs but even this is rare.  We had an elderly beagle once and there is a local elderly beagle rescue that would have a much better chance of adopting him out so we gave him over there and took one of their younger beagles that didn't quite fit with their mission.

We do euthanize dogs (or cats) that are insanely aggressive with no hope for rehabilitation.  These are few and far between.  We will euthanize an animal if the vet says it is suffering and it is the most humane thing to do.  We do not euthanize for treatable injury or illness no matter how much that injury costs.

The downsides to our no-kill philosophy.  We spend a TON of money on vet care.  With that money, we could probably build and staff another 3 buildings.  We have a very long wait list.  We always take in a pregnant, sick or injured animal but other strays have to wait.  If those strays die out in the wild was keeping a less attractive old cat alive the better option? To me, once you are in, you stay until you go home is better but I see the other side too.  Is it humane to keep a cat in a cage for 2 years? If we didn't spend all that money on the major medical stuff and we let say 20 cats be euthanized/year for treatable illness/injury but could build a building that could house 50 more strays at a time, which is more humane?

I like the way my shelter is run and generally, I wouldn't change it.  There are one or two medical situations that I think the money wasn't worth the investment on that particular animal for various reasons.  We have encountered many sneaky not really no kill shelters that claim to be but I just wanted to say that there are many out there that are for real no kill and run their organization as ethically as possible (while admitting that every option has a flip side that could be considered more ethical.)

KBecks2

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #35 on: January 29, 2015, 01:23:11 PM »
Have you offered the cats in your Facebook circle of friends?   I got the best cat ever from an acquaintance who had found him as a stray and posted on Facebook that she had this extra cat that needed a home.   Cute pictures helps with the marketing.

P.S.  There is no way I'd take two cats.  Keeping two cats together is a much tougher sell.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2015, 01:25:05 PM by KBecks2 »

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #36 on: January 29, 2015, 07:10:51 PM »
Have you offered the cats in your Facebook circle of friends?   I got the best cat ever from an acquaintance who had found him as a stray and posted on Facebook that she had this extra cat that needed a home.   Cute pictures helps with marketing.

This could be a good suggestion.

In my case, I have two cats, 9 and 2.  The nine year-old has medical issues that require him to have medicated food.  Unfortunately, we are planning to retire to South America in 2 1/2 years.  So we can't bring him with us, because we will never be able to get him the food he needs in Belize or Ecuador.  Luckily, my husband's cousin is willing to take him, so we are financially planning to give her several thousand dollars to compensate her for the expensive food she is going to have to buy.

Our younger cat will be coming with us, assuming she can handle it.  We will plan to do a little domestic traveling with her before we pull the plug, to see how well she tolerates it.  If she really can't handle the stress, it will break my heart, but a good friend who loves her has said she will take our little Petunia.  God, even thinking about it makes me sick.  I love my little girl so much. But the most important thing is for her to be okay.

Annamal

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #37 on: January 29, 2015, 07:50:27 PM »
Having a pet needs to be a choice for life.  There are too many animals and not enough homes.  Everything you're going through is a function of this challenge - the true no-kill shelters have massive waiting lists and can fill up immediately by getting the most adoptable animals out of the animal control shelters.

One other option is put an adoption listing up at the vet's office you've used.  I've seen some success that route and it is a captive and responsible audience.

People's lives change in unexpected ways, we had a horrendous time when my partner turned out to be allergic to the cat we had adopted (he's fine with most cats but for some reason this cat's fur triggered a previously unknown allergy). Fortunately our vet fell in love with her so we were confident in her new home (and she had a happy life bossing around a Doberman and a small child) but I can imagine some other situations that could have turned out much worse.

Sorry that you in this position arebelspy, I hope things work out for you and your moggies.

Annamal

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #38 on: January 29, 2015, 08:00:18 PM »

I really don't want to take this thread too far off track here but there are places that do "no kill" right.  I volunteer at one and I am willing to recognize the one or two downsides.  We do NOT pawn any animals off to any kill shelters and would never do that.  We do sometimes give an animal to another no-kill shelter that is better suited to its needs but even this is rare.  We had an elderly beagle once and there is a local elderly beagle rescue that would have a much better chance of adopting him out so we gave him over there and took one of their younger beagles that didn't quite fit with their mission.

We do euthanize dogs (or cats) that are insanely aggressive with no hope for rehabilitation.  These are few and far between.  We will euthanize an animal if the vet says it is suffering and it is the most humane thing to do.  We do not euthanize for treatable injury or illness no matter how much that injury costs.

The downsides to our no-kill philosophy.  We spend a TON of money on vet care.  With that money, we could probably build and staff another 3 buildings.  We have a very long wait list.  We always take in a pregnant, sick or injured animal but other strays have to wait.  If those strays die out in the wild was keeping a less attractive old cat alive the better option? To me, once you are in, you stay until you go home is better but I see the other side too.  Is it humane to keep a cat in a cage for 2 years? If we didn't spend all that money on the major medical stuff and we let say 20 cats be euthanized/year for treatable illness/injury but could build a building that could house 50 more strays at a time, which is more humane?

I like the way my shelter is run and generally, I wouldn't change it.  There are one or two medical situations that I think the money wasn't worth the investment on that particular animal for various reasons.  We have encountered many sneaky not really no kill shelters that claim to be but I just wanted to say that there are many out there that are for real no kill and run their organization as ethically as possible (while admitting that every option has a flip side that could be considered more ethical.)

Our local no kill shelter solves the older cats/cats with medical issues problem to a certain extent by fostering cats (i.e. you take the cat home and pay for food etc but the shelter pays medical expenses), it's still expensive but it could give an older cat some decent quality of life.

Kris

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2015, 08:11:41 PM »

I really don't want to take this thread too far off track here but there are places that do "no kill" right.  I volunteer at one and I am willing to recognize the one or two downsides.  We do NOT pawn any animals off to any kill shelters and would never do that.  We do sometimes give an animal to another no-kill shelter that is better suited to its needs but even this is rare.  We had an elderly beagle once and there is a local elderly beagle rescue that would have a much better chance of adopting him out so we gave him over there and took one of their younger beagles that didn't quite fit with their mission.

We do euthanize dogs (or cats) that are insanely aggressive with no hope for rehabilitation.  These are few and far between.  We will euthanize an animal if the vet says it is suffering and it is the most humane thing to do.  We do not euthanize for treatable injury or illness no matter how much that injury costs.

The downsides to our no-kill philosophy.  We spend a TON of money on vet care.  With that money, we could probably build and staff another 3 buildings.  We have a very long wait list.  We always take in a pregnant, sick or injured animal but other strays have to wait.  If those strays die out in the wild was keeping a less attractive old cat alive the better option? To me, once you are in, you stay until you go home is better but I see the other side too.  Is it humane to keep a cat in a cage for 2 years? If we didn't spend all that money on the major medical stuff and we let say 20 cats be euthanized/year for treatable illness/injury but could build a building that could house 50 more strays at a time, which is more humane?

I like the way my shelter is run and generally, I wouldn't change it.  There are one or two medical situations that I think the money wasn't worth the investment on that particular animal for various reasons.  We have encountered many sneaky not really no kill shelters that claim to be but I just wanted to say that there are many out there that are for real no kill and run their organization as ethically as possible (while admitting that every option has a flip side that could be considered more ethical.)

Our local no kill shelter solves the older cats/cats with medical issues problem to a certain extent by fostering cats (i.e. you take the cat home and pay for food etc but the shelter pays medical expenses), it's still expensive but it could give an older cat some decent quality of life.

I just want to say, thank you for volunteering. It must be emotionally distressing on a level I can't even imagine to euthanize an animal that has no hope for rehabilitation.  Warm fuzzies and good thoughts aside, being willing to make hard decisions that no one wants to must be so incredibly emotionally taxing.  I know I wouldn't want to.   Thank you from the bottom of my animal loving heart.

Gin1984

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #40 on: January 29, 2015, 08:12:48 PM »
Asp, could they rotate through a set of people's homes, with you covering expenses?  I don't know why you need to give them up but I know my aunt kept a dog for a while like that.

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #41 on: January 29, 2015, 08:29:36 PM »

[/quote]

I just want to say, thank you for volunteering. It must be emotionally distressing on a level I can't even imagine to euthanize an animal that has no hope for rehabilitation.  Warm fuzzies and good thoughts aside, being willing to make hard decisions that no one wants to must be so incredibly emotionally taxing.  I know I wouldn't want to.   Thank you from the bottom of my animal loving heart.
[/quote]

Luckily, I don't have to make that decision!! We are all still very sad when it happens though.


[/quote]

Our local no kill shelter solves the older cats/cats with medical issues problem to a certain extent by fostering cats (i.e. you take the cat home and pay for food etc but the shelter pays medical expenses), it's still expensive but it could give an older cat some decent quality of life.
[/quote]

We do that too.  We do a lot of "long term foster" arrangements and medical fosters.

MicroRN

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #42 on: January 29, 2015, 08:55:25 PM »
There are also some pet sanctuaries out there that will take animals in for life, usually for a fee.  You have to be cautious, because many so-called sanctuaries are actually pet hoarders.  There are legit ones though. 

southern granny

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #43 on: January 30, 2015, 05:21:10 PM »
No-kill shelters are a bit of a misnomer.  They don't kill animals themselves . . . but if the animal has been with them for X amount of time and hasn't found a home, they often will shuffle the animal to a different shelter, one that DOES put animals down. 

Ask about this before you surrender an animal.

Not always.  One local group has a dog they have had for over 5 years because a little too much aggression.  Just recently, they paid for the dog to be sent away for intensive behavioral training.  They reported that he did great.  I haven't heard if it helped him get adopted. 

Astatine

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #44 on: January 31, 2015, 03:12:57 AM »
Arebelspy: I also suggest advertising with your Facebook friends (or if you don't have a Facebook account, do you have an animal-loving friend who does and post for you with cute pics of the cats and can provide a kitty-reference of what their behavior and personality is like?)

We adopted our 2 cats from one of DH's friends whose toddler's cat allergies was making him noticeably sick plus hives etc. both cats were 3 years old and DH had looked after them and we knew they were gentle cats. His friends advertised on Facebook, we thought about it for a week then said yes.

Returnoftheyeti

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #45 on: January 31, 2015, 10:13:02 AM »
Quote
Having a pet needs to be a choice for life. 


 Rover has no behavioral issues, but suppose he's not good with babies or suppose they are too busy to worry about Rover any more.  Or somebody gets a new boyfriend/girlfriend who doesn't like dogs, so Rover has got to go.  That makes me crazy and those people are jerks.

So true

Quote

But there are people who have serious, life changing situation, that I understand.  A few years ago, when the economy was worse, we encountered people who had lost jobs and were getting evicted from their homes and were forced to move into places that wouldn't take dogs, or people whose kids have developed serious, untreatable allergies.  Yes, in some circumstances pets do need to be rehomed.

Losing a job and being forced to move is not a reason to get rid of a pet.  You need to make smarter decisions.  And look for places that take pets.  Pets are a commitment for life.  Period.  Know that going into the pet acquisition process. 

If you have to move, you take the pet.  Ends of story.

It's all about education and making smarter decisions.  It's not the cats fault you overextended yourself and took an interest only Balloon loan on a McMansion.  You should not have done that.

If you are so poor with money management that you can't afford to feed a pet if you were to lose your job, don't get a pet.

If you loses your shiny fancy pants job, and can't get another one.  Go work at Walmart. Suck it up, get a job, and feed / house the companion that you committed to.

This is the most important thing in any lifestyle change, financial or any other change.  Mentally commit and don't back down.  Make a mental change.  You would not give away you kid, or your parent if you lost a job would you?  Why would you give away a pet?  You can find a way to keep your pet, you just need to make a sacrifice. None of this woe is me.



totoro

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #46 on: January 31, 2015, 12:21:20 PM »
I say do post an ad on craigslist.  We found our dog-share family this way and they are wonderful.

I would investigate the home circumstances and maybe you want to remain the place they can leave the cats if they go on vacation if this is possible?  This is a bonus for the new family and permits you to remain in contact. 

I do agree with assisting with costs for the pets on an ongoing basis.  In our dog-share we share vet visits and grooming and it works out well. 

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #47 on: January 31, 2015, 12:30:21 PM »
People lie/exaggerate about allergies a lot.  There is a big difference between I get a little sneezy and have to take claritin and I can't breathe and have to go to the ER.

I concur.  99% of people who are allergic to cats if they just give it some time their body will adjust to them and the 'sniffles" will pass. There are soooooo many people who say they are allergic to cats and it's just flat out bullsh!t.

JetsettingWelfareMom

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #48 on: January 31, 2015, 12:32:00 PM »
I vote for Craigslist also. We got the most awesome dog ever from there--the shelters weren't that good for us because in Vegas it seemed to be 75% pitbull mixes (too boxy for the toddler) and 25% chihahaus (a bit yappy and I've heard not great with kids). We searched far and wide for a few weeks just looking for "any old mutt." Harder to find her than you think but I'm so grateful I went the Craigslist route...it gave peace of mind to Molly's former owners to interview my family and make sure we were a good fit (they'd had one other person turn the poor dog back into them after a day). It's not about money it's about putting in the time...

Sofa King

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Re: Surrendering/ReHoming Pets
« Reply #49 on: January 31, 2015, 12:35:35 PM »
Quote
Having a pet needs to be a choice for life. 


Yes and no.  I volunteer with a rescue and it is infuriating how many people will try to dump their animals without much reason or any effort to find another solution.  The number of sweet young couples come in looking to get us to take Rover because the wife is pregnant...  Rover has no behavioral issues, but suppose he's not good with babies or suppose they are too busy to worry about Rover any more.  Or somebody gets a new boyfriend/girlfriend who doesn't like dogs, so Rover has got to go.  That makes me crazy and those people are jerks.



I concur. In most cases if you can abandon/surrender a pet to a shelter then you really never loved the animal. If you did then giving up your pet would never even be an option.