Author Topic: stuck in a bad school district  (Read 26186 times)

MrsPete

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #50 on: October 10, 2015, 10:10:21 AM »
More information.

 they don't have many programs if any at the district i am in, such as no AP classes,
I guarantee this is not true.  A decade ago, yes, a small school /small district might not've been able to offer AP classes, but AP classes are now available on the internet.  Available.  Everywhere.

merula

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #51 on: October 10, 2015, 07:18:45 PM »
Maybe he meant they don't have AP classes in kindergarten?

MrsPete

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #52 on: October 10, 2015, 07:39:27 PM »
Maybe he meant they don't have AP classes in kindergarten?
Okay, that is true. 

Blonde Lawyer

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #53 on: October 14, 2015, 02:12:40 PM »
Do you mean people let their dogs crap on other people's lawns or that people let their pets crap on their own lawns?  My dog craps on my lawn and I rarely scoop it, particularly because it on the edges of the yard and it is my lawn.  I've heard some HOA's require you to scoop even if it is your own lawn which I think is totally insane.  I wouldn't want to live somewhere that my pet couldn't crap on its own lawn. :)

justajane

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #54 on: October 14, 2015, 02:48:06 PM »
Maybe he meant they don't have AP classes in kindergarten?
Okay, that is true.

This takes on a new light for me, as I just learned in the past week that my school has a rather cloak and dagger gifted program for which children are hand selected in first grade based on IQ and other tests that I didn't even know they took. I didn't know any of this because my kid apparently didn't make the cut to receive accelerated instruction and extra projects and field trips beginning in the second grade. After much googling, I was finally able to find some information about this program, and apparently its only iteration in high school is AP courses. Does that mean my un-gifted child can't take them? My entire perception of my school district has changed, and not in a good way.

elaine amj

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #55 on: October 14, 2015, 03:20:07 PM »
Interesting discussion about good schools/bad schools.

Personally, I don't feel it matters as much as your own child's personality and attitude towards learning.

I spent elementary school in a private school and had great teachers. My brother was in the exact same school (and same grade) and ended up with the worst teachers. That, along with a few other factors annoyed my mother so much she pulled him out and sent him to the local "bad school". he did about the same there as in the private school (bad). I stayed put and did the same (ok).

When it was time for high school, my mom said no more private school and we both went to a public "bad school". It was fine. Education was fine. Opportunities were fine. No bells and whistles. The public school was a little behind academically but nothing that affected the rest of our lives. We both made great friends, had a great time, and graduated high school just fine. Cost my parents a whole lot less :)

As a parent myself, we just decided to send my kids to a public high school that is ranked worse than her other option (where other people move into the area specifically for this highly rated school). But the one we chose is walking distance to our house. And you know what? She's getting a very good education and we are very happy with out choice.

In your situation - remember, all those extra opportunities your wife feels is important? Those only really come into play in high school. You can easily stay where you are throughout elementary school. By that time, you should have enough paid off to be able to move rather than struggling to do it by 2018.

show me the money

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #56 on: October 15, 2015, 06:46:39 AM »
Do you mean people let their dogs crap on other people's lawns or that people let their pets crap on their own lawns?  My dog craps on my lawn and I rarely scoop it, particularly because it on the edges of the yard and it is my lawn.  I've heard some HOA's require you to scoop even if it is your own lawn which I think is totally insane.  I wouldn't want to live somewhere that my pet couldn't crap on its own lawn. :)

other peoples lawns.

our dogs use our fenced in backyard, and when we walk we always have bags


EDIT 10/15/15 6:23pm :
Just got home and there is some kind of animal crap on my front yard. it is not just the school district. i need to leave

« Last Edit: October 15, 2015, 04:24:08 PM by show me the money »

show me the money

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #57 on: October 15, 2015, 06:49:41 AM »
More information.

 they don't have many programs if any at the district i am in, such as no AP classes,
I guarantee this is not true.  A decade ago, yes, a small school /small district might not've been able to offer AP classes, but AP classes are now available on the internet.  Available.  Everywhere.

i found out they have two ap classes, versus something like 30 at the district we like.

show me the money

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #58 on: October 15, 2015, 04:27:29 PM »

In your situation - remember, all those extra opportunities your wife feels is important? Those only really come into play in high school. You can easily stay where you are throughout elementary school. By that time, you should have enough paid off to be able to move rather than struggling to do it by 2018.

Its not just about the school district, and while i can agree with your point, i came home to animal crap on my front lawn again today, i see this happen all the time around here, i don't want my son going to school here, and i really don't want him making friends with the people here, if that makes me snooty or snobby then so be it, these people have no respect for themselves or anyone else.

Apples

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #59 on: October 16, 2015, 09:07:32 AM »
Maybe he meant they don't have AP classes in kindergarten?
Okay, that is true.

This takes on a new light for me, as I just learned in the past week that my school has a rather cloak and dagger gifted program for which children are hand selected in first grade based on IQ and other tests that I didn't even know they took. I didn't know any of this because my kid apparently didn't make the cut to receive accelerated instruction and extra projects and field trips beginning in the second grade. After much googling, I was finally able to find some information about this program, and apparently its only iteration in high school is AP courses. Does that mean my un-gifted child can't take them? My entire perception of my school district has changed, and not in a good way.

Obviously, no one here knows how your school will work out.  I didn't make the cut for our Gifted program, though I was tested three times (IQ 3 pts short ftw haha).  In elementary school they got all these classes and field trips and projects.  They were also in the regular classes and mostly my friends, since they were "my kind of people".  At 7, haha.  In middle school, they could take some technology, foreign language, and other classes that regular kids couldn't.  But our advanced tracks for math/science and english were the top 25-30 kids in each of those subjects, which didn't always include the Gifted kids, depending on their abilities.  And in high school, the advanced track middle school kids* were the only ones set to take Calculus and Stats before graduation, unless someone took two math classes in the same year.  English didn't really matter-there were cool electives for anyone in College Prep or Honors (like 65% of the school).  So at my school the G&T track definitely helped, but it wasn't the exclusive way to participate in AP courses.  I'd ask around at the h.s. who gets into those A.P. classes.  Because I'm pretty sure my school's website says something along the lines of "in h.s. our G&T students have opportunities to explore their interests and abilities through various electives and AP course offerings".  Though AP is open to anyone high achieving in that subject.  And my school has throughout the years had students work out some chances to take classes at the local colleges for h.s. and college credit if they were very high achieving.  Excellent grades and an aptitude for a subject can't be denied.

*In math, the highest track was chosen in 5th grade.  3-4 students joined in 6th and 7th and about 8 dropped down a "level" to only 1-year-ahead-of-grade-level.  In science it was chosen in 8th grade.  English was "sorted out" for leveled learning in 5th**, but people switched levels throughout school until senior year. OP, I would move before the end of elementary school if the other district operates the way mine did.  New students were almost never put in the most advanced tracks their first year, and in the case of math that permanently left them out of the highest class.  (It's nearly impossible for an above-average student to just skip from pre-algebra to Alg. 2).

**Thank God for leveled learning tracks.  Saved my sanity as a 10 year old.  We went back to mixed English/Reading classes in 7th grade, and we spent a month learning about Verbs, read A Christmas Carol out loud with students who couldn't sound out words like "looked".  I learned patience and tolerance that year, but not English.

Edited to fix some spelling mistakes, though I won't say there may not be more of them in there :p
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 09:09:22 AM by Apples »

Apples

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #60 on: October 16, 2015, 09:16:47 AM »
More information.

 they don't have many programs if any at the district i am in, such as no AP classes,
I guarantee this is not true.  A decade ago, yes, a small school /small district might not've been able to offer AP classes, but AP classes are now available on the internet.  Available.  Everywhere.

I agree they're available, but the school could be extremely hard to work with on this.  An above-average student at my school would have taken up to 2-3 AP classes senior year, if they were in the highest-achieving group.  That's if they wanted Calculus and American History.  The other class was College Gym you could use for phys ed credits at a local college.  And it would take MAJOR parent and student lobbying to get a different course approved that would also count as credits for the school.  Unless your kid wants to do AP Econ in addition to their regular 1/2 year of Econ with the Honors class, and AP Psych all on their own time.  For highly motivated students, sure that works.  But I know from my freshman year of college that an above-average student (same kid, aka me haha) at a different school would have had a whole list of available AP courses and been able to take many of them.  Because that's the "normal" level of above average achievement there.  Many of my peers had already taken a lot of AP classes that got them out of gen eds and freshman classes.  I just didn't know that was possible.

justajane

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #61 on: October 16, 2015, 10:02:38 AM »
Maybe he meant they don't have AP classes in kindergarten?
Okay, that is true.

This takes on a new light for me, as I just learned in the past week that my school has a rather cloak and dagger gifted program for which children are hand selected in first grade based on IQ and other tests that I didn't even know they took. I didn't know any of this because my kid apparently didn't make the cut to receive accelerated instruction and extra projects and field trips beginning in the second grade. After much googling, I was finally able to find some information about this program, and apparently its only iteration in high school is AP courses. Does that mean my un-gifted child can't take them? My entire perception of my school district has changed, and not in a good way.

Obviously, no one here knows how your school will work out.  I didn't make the cut for our Gifted program, though I was tested three times (IQ 3 pts short ftw haha).  In elementary school they got all these classes and field trips and projects.  They were also in the regular classes and mostly my friends, since they were "my kind of people".  At 7, haha.  In middle school, they could take some technology, foreign language, and other classes that regular kids couldn't.  But our advanced tracks for math/science and english were the top 25-30 kids in each of those subjects, which didn't always include the Gifted kids, depending on their abilities.  And in high school, the advanced track middle school kids* were the only ones set to take Calculus and Stats before graduation, unless someone took two math classes in the same year.  English didn't really matter-there were cool electives for anyone in College Prep or Honors (like 65% of the school).  So at my school the G&T track definitely helped, but it wasn't the exclusive way to participate in AP courses.  I'd ask around at the h.s. who gets into those A.P. classes.  Because I'm pretty sure my school's website says something along the lines of "in h.s. our G&T students have opportunities to explore their interests and abilities through various electives and AP course offerings".  Though AP is open to anyone high achieving in that subject.  And my school has throughout the years had students work out some chances to take classes at the local colleges for h.s. and college credit if they were very high achieving.  Excellent grades and an aptitude for a subject can't be denied.

*In math, the highest track was chosen in 5th grade.  3-4 students joined in 6th and 7th and about 8 dropped down a "level" to only 1-year-ahead-of-grade-level.  In science it was chosen in 8th grade.  English was "sorted out" for leveled learning in 5th**, but people switched levels throughout school until senior year. OP, I would move before the end of elementary school if the other district operates the way mine did.  New students were almost never put in the most advanced tracks their first year, and in the case of math that permanently left them out of the highest class.  (It's nearly impossible for an above-average student to just skip from pre-algebra to Alg. 2).

**Thank God for leveled learning tracks.  Saved my sanity as a 10 year old.  We went back to mixed English/Reading classes in 7th grade, and we spent a month learning about Verbs, read A Christmas Carol out loud with students who couldn't sound out words like "looked".  I learned patience and tolerance that year, but not English.

Edited to fix some spelling mistakes, though I won't say there may not be more of them in there :p

Thanks so much for your reply and perspective. I would probably guess based on how many of my kids' friends who I have found out are in the gifted program that he was just like you -- on the cusp but didn't make the cut. This has all thrown me for a huge loop. I'm guessing that my larger, highly ranked school district had these types of programs 30 years ago and I was just blissfully unaware that I didn't fit into their category. I might add, that I graduated second in my class and took multiple AP courses, went on to an elite private university and now have a Ph.D. Obviously not being labeled "gifted" at a young age didn't hold me back. But I'm glad I didn't know of this designation at the time. Unfortunately, I don't imagine that my child will be able to remain as blissfully unaware of the categories and labels that have already been given to him and his classmates, since our district is very small.

I know for people who teach and are in the system that this kind of thing becomes very normalized. But I am really, really bothered by such stratification. I sent my child to a public school, because I believe in the public school system. I knew that as a bright kid, he would likely be bored a lot in school, but I thought that was okay. Now that I am learning that egalitarianism and equal opportunity are really shams anyway, I'm not sure why I haven't considered other private options for my kids. We have three and likely can't afford sending all of them to private schools. But if I start to feel that one or more of my kids are not being challenged or held back in any way by program limits or other things? Hell, yeah, now I'm going to check my former principals at the door and move them somewhere more exclusive or take them under my wing at home. Fuck the common good.   

mm1970

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #62 on: October 16, 2015, 01:53:35 PM »
Maybe he meant they don't have AP classes in kindergarten?
Okay, that is true.

This takes on a new light for me, as I just learned in the past week that my school has a rather cloak and dagger gifted program for which children are hand selected in first grade based on IQ and other tests that I didn't even know they took. I didn't know any of this because my kid apparently didn't make the cut to receive accelerated instruction and extra projects and field trips beginning in the second grade. After much googling, I was finally able to find some information about this program, and apparently its only iteration in high school is AP courses. Does that mean my un-gifted child can't take them? My entire perception of my school district has changed, and not in a good way.

Obviously, no one here knows how your school will work out.  I didn't make the cut for our Gifted program, though I was tested three times (IQ 3 pts short ftw haha).  In elementary school they got all these classes and field trips and projects.  They were also in the regular classes and mostly my friends, since they were "my kind of people".  At 7, haha.  In middle school, they could take some technology, foreign language, and other classes that regular kids couldn't.  But our advanced tracks for math/science and english were the top 25-30 kids in each of those subjects, which didn't always include the Gifted kids, depending on their abilities.  And in high school, the advanced track middle school kids* were the only ones set to take Calculus and Stats before graduation, unless someone took two math classes in the same year.  English didn't really matter-there were cool electives for anyone in College Prep or Honors (like 65% of the school).  So at my school the G&T track definitely helped, but it wasn't the exclusive way to participate in AP courses.  I'd ask around at the h.s. who gets into those A.P. classes.  Because I'm pretty sure my school's website says something along the lines of "in h.s. our G&T students have opportunities to explore their interests and abilities through various electives and AP course offerings".  Though AP is open to anyone high achieving in that subject.  And my school has throughout the years had students work out some chances to take classes at the local colleges for h.s. and college credit if they were very high achieving.  Excellent grades and an aptitude for a subject can't be denied.

*In math, the highest track was chosen in 5th grade.  3-4 students joined in 6th and 7th and about 8 dropped down a "level" to only 1-year-ahead-of-grade-level.  In science it was chosen in 8th grade.  English was "sorted out" for leveled learning in 5th**, but people switched levels throughout school until senior year. OP, I would move before the end of elementary school if the other district operates the way mine did.  New students were almost never put in the most advanced tracks their first year, and in the case of math that permanently left them out of the highest class.  (It's nearly impossible for an above-average student to just skip from pre-algebra to Alg. 2).

**Thank God for leveled learning tracks.  Saved my sanity as a 10 year old.  We went back to mixed English/Reading classes in 7th grade, and we spent a month learning about Verbs, read A Christmas Carol out loud with students who couldn't sound out words like "looked".  I learned patience and tolerance that year, but not English.

Edited to fix some spelling mistakes, though I won't say there may not be more of them in there :p

Thanks so much for your reply and perspective. I would probably guess based on how many of my kids' friends who I have found out are in the gifted program that he was just like you -- on the cusp but didn't make the cut. This has all thrown me for a huge loop. I'm guessing that my larger, highly ranked school district had these types of programs 30 years ago and I was just blissfully unaware that I didn't fit into their category. I might add, that I graduated second in my class and took multiple AP courses, went on to an elite private university and now have a Ph.D. Obviously not being labeled "gifted" at a young age didn't hold me back. But I'm glad I didn't know of this designation at the time. Unfortunately, I don't imagine that my child will be able to remain as blissfully unaware of the categories and labels that have already been given to him and his classmates, since our district is very small.

I know for people who teach and are in the system that this kind of thing becomes very normalized. But I am really, really bothered by such stratification. I sent my child to a public school, because I believe in the public school system. I knew that as a bright kid, he would likely be bored a lot in school, but I thought that was okay. Now that I am learning that egalitarianism and equal opportunity are really shams anyway, I'm not sure why I haven't considered other private options for my kids. We have three and likely can't afford sending all of them to private schools. But if I start to feel that one or more of my kids are not being challenged or held back in any way by program limits or other things? Hell, yeah, now I'm going to check my former principals at the door and move them somewhere more exclusive or take them under my wing at home. Fuck the common good.
This is interesting to me.  When I was a kid, I was in the gifted program. So was my husband.  In the 70s, at our schools, it wasn't a big thing.  We had one hour a week or so where we were split out.  Some of the stuff was interesting, but...there were only 3 kids in my grade in gifted.  You were chosed based on an IQ test in 1st grade.  They never tested after.  Well, long story short, yeah I graduated #1 in my class (of about 100), but the next four people were tied, and NONE of them were gifted.  It wasn't a very useful designation or program.

So in my son's school, they changed the rules district-wide. 
ALL students are tested in 2nd grade.  It used to be you were only tested if you were recommended by a teacher or requested by a parent.
There is one school with a magnet gate program, where it's 100% GATE kids in one classroom per grade.  So they may have 4 third grade classrooms, and one of them is GATE only.  Used to be that students in that public school attendance area got first dibs.  But since it's a DISTRICT funded GATE program, they changed the rules.  So ALL students in that grade who are identified as GATE and want to go to that program go into a lottery for the 25 spots.  There are 10 public schools in the district, so that makes it a lot harder for the kids in that home school to get in.  But also makes it much fairer for all the other students.
All other elementary schools can have GATE programs, and many do.  In fact the school with the magnet program also has a school GATE program.
You are not allowed to take the GATE test more than 2x in a row.  So if you don't make it in 2nd, you can take it in 3rd.  But if you don't make it, you can't take it again. 
No studying for the GATE test, that's cheating!
Whether or not you are selected DOES depend on your English proficiency and income.  The standards for English learners are lower.
Aside from the GATE test, our school (as well as most schools), separate kids out by proficiency.  Starting in 1st grade, they broke out the "accelerated readers" into a small group  from all 3 classes. 
For math, they did the same.  Most teachers give two different sets of spelling lists and math homework, depending on your level.

My son's first grade teacher said this "When your son passes the gate test - and he will - PLEASE do not transfer him out.  Too many parents do that, he will get a GREAT education here."  And so, that's what we decided to do (plus we'd looked at the other school before kinder, and were kind of put off by it.  Lots of rich families.)
Well, in the end, he didn't make GATE, so it was a moot point.  We opted not to test him last year in 3rd and we won't test him this year either.  He has plenty of opportunity in his regular classes to be challenged. 
And any parent, really, has the opportunity to discuss these programs with the teachers.  The teachers are more than happy to help.  And it's fluid - the high level math and English groups change as kids get better.  It's not like if you don't make the group you are never allowed in.

I'd recommend talking to your kid's teacher about all this. 

Honestly we DO have a problem in my town with a lot of type-A parents wanting their kid in GATE and actually helping their kids study for the test so they can get these great opportunities.  GATE doesn't necessarily mean "smart", it means GATE.  There's a lot of strife.  And the parents at the magnet program school were PISSED when they changed the procedure for getting into the program.

You know who I want the chance to get into GATE?  That kid in my son's class whose parents speak only Spanish.  That kid is SMART and hardworking, and his parents clearly support his education (many here do not). 
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 01:56:56 PM by mm1970 »

justajane

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #63 on: October 16, 2015, 02:21:05 PM »
I'd recommend talking to your kid's teacher about all this. 

We have started a dialogue with the principal expressing our concerns. I'm really intrigued because, unlike area districts, our gifted program is extremely hidden. I mean, you can't find jack shit about it. It's not even called GATE but another generic name. There's absolutely nothing on the website, nor in the district's student handbook. I did a search on the district's website and came up with only two generic articles that briefly mentioned the kids, i.e. "X program kids attended a field trip to X cultural sight." It really makes me wonder what's going on. I only found out about it because a parent mentioned it to me offhand. It's like a secret society of sorts.

I hope that the principal doesn't think I'm a controlling parent who wants my kid in the program. In some respects, I would prefer a system that did away with the "gifted" terminology altogether and just created IEPs for students who can't be fully serviced in the regular classroom. This probably comes from my own background as someone who tested decently but not extremely well. I don't think IQ and standardized tests can tell the full story of a child's talents or intellectual capabilities. I'm mostly just upset that all this testing and evaluating went on without my knowledge. My son will be fine in the regular classroom. I was bored very often. I supplemented my education by reading advanced literature voraciously at home. That was my outlet and where I learned to think. He is showing the same tendency.

I recognize that some students are extraordinarily gifted and can't be serviced just in a normal setting. But my son's class is only 100 kids. I find it hard to believe that more than 5 of those kids would fit that category, so likely some of the kids are placed in the "gifted" program who don't really need to be there. Our area also has an "extraordinarily gifted" school to which the select few can attend from any district. I'm glad that exists and just hope that the right kids get placed there so they can thrive.

Like you, we have separate reading and math groups based on their current level. I think that works quite nicely.

Apples

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #64 on: October 17, 2015, 10:53:54 AM »
I'd recommend talking to your kid's teacher about all this. 

We have started a dialogue with the principal expressing our concerns. I'm really intrigued because, unlike area districts, our gifted program is extremely hidden. I mean, you can't find jack shit about it. It's not even called GATE but another generic name. There's absolutely nothing on the website, nor in the district's student handbook. I did a search on the district's website and came up with only two generic articles that briefly mentioned the kids, i.e. "X program kids attended a field trip to X cultural sight." It really makes me wonder what's going on. I only found out about it because a parent mentioned it to me offhand. It's like a secret society of sorts.

I hope that the principal doesn't think I'm a controlling parent who wants my kid in the program. In some respects, I would prefer a system that did away with the "gifted" terminology altogether and just created IEPs for students who can't be fully serviced in the regular classroom. This probably comes from my own background as someone who tested decently but not extremely well. I don't think IQ and standardized tests can tell the full story of a child's talents or intellectual capabilities. I'm mostly just upset that all this testing and evaluating went on without my knowledge. My son will be fine in the regular classroom. I was bored very often. I supplemented my education by reading advanced literature voraciously at home. That was my outlet and where I learned to think. He is showing the same tendency.

I recognize that some students are extraordinarily gifted and can't be serviced just in a normal setting. But my son's class is only 100 kids. I find it hard to believe that more than 5 of those kids would fit that category, so likely some of the kids are placed in the "gifted" program who don't really need to be there. Our area also has an "extraordinarily gifted" school to which the select few can attend from any district. I'm glad that exists and just hope that the right kids get placed there so they can thrive.

Like you, we have separate reading and math groups based on their current level. I think that works quite nicely.

I had 125 kids in my grade, about 10ish (maybe 15-we had a pretty "smart" class, better than others) were Gifted.  You only got tested if a teacher recommended it.  I was given "different" books to read in 2nd grade b/c I already had an 6th grade reading level (you can see here why several teachers sent me to be tested).  And funnily enough I ended up valedictorian.  I know I wasn't in Gifted, I don't think #2 was either, but 3-10 were about 50% gifted.  All of the top 10 were in the highest tracks available.  I think that's key as long as there's room in those tracks for everyone good enough to be in them, and we're not going into crazy lottery situations.

At my elementary school the gifted program was pretty low key.  Meet once a week, go on some field trips, etc.  I think students that needed a special school eventually left the district.  My mom was a substitute teacher in the school, and a parent volunteer, so knew of the program.  They sent home paperwork parents needed to fill out for me to be tested, so she really knew about it.  She then discussed why I didn't get in (see above with being given advanced books, and could do higher level math, but I was tiny so she didn't want to put me up a grade).  It got even lower key as we got older.  There are exactly 4 paragraphs for the whole program written on the school website, and other than the fact that there's field trips and explaining the testing, everything they list is open to all high achieving students.  There is a possibility that the school's program seems secret because it really doesn't lead to much, and depending on the personality of the district they may not be the type to flaunt or advertise this program if most kids are average and the program doesn't add a whole ton of value (not that you'll get them to admit it).  And my district is around 60% going into ANY KIND of post secondary education, including votech certificates.  So most of the parents are not the types to get tied up in state rankings and test scores,as long as the school is doing around average or better.  YMMV. 

One key difference compared to some others here is that my district is made of one school per age level-so one elementary, one middle, and one high.  So the 10-15 gifted in my grade were all there was in the whole district.  So the advanced classes at higher level were of course filled with non-gifted kids.  Other people here posting about GATE programs and even classrooms and districts having lotteries for spots in classrooms makes me nervous!

Final thought:  generally, if the school has AP classes (or an equivalent, we had College in the High School) in more than a handful of subjects, then it's probably fine.  Mine, as stated before, had 3 and one of those was gym.  Just to show that I still did ok in life...I got into an Ivy and turned them down for a full ride at a state university.  But a school with more class options would have served me better, regardless of gifted or not.

So OP, I still vote that you move, but don't worry too much until middle school.  And Justajane good luck!  Let the principal think whatever he/she wants, they get plenty of actually crazy parents I'm sure.  And I'm done derailing this thread now, promise.

ETA:  I knew of the designation, and that I didn't get it, throughout elementary school.  It bugged me.  It bugged me that my friends got to go do cool things, and take French in 5th grade. I was completely aware that they were "smarter" than me (try explaining to an 8-12 year old that a higher IQ and easily accelerated work doesn't mean smarter).  In the average school year I may have spent a grand total of 3 days of time being jealous-mostly field trip days.  But I didn't think they were so much better than me that I couldn't keep up, or anything like that.  I still did most of the same stuff they did.  And we were all good/bad at different subjects sometimes. It also bugged me that some of my friends were very good dancers, and I really couldn't dance.  Or that they had prettier handwriting.  Heck, that lasted through high school.  Most kids just swim along doing their own thing, because what else is there to do?
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 11:03:57 AM by Apples »

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #65 on: October 17, 2015, 11:05:58 AM »
I was "gifted." I was your stereotypical overpraised child--everyone told me how very clever I was, but no one ever taught me to work hard or take risks. That would have been a lot more valuable than a handful of enrichment lessons and some good test scores. If I couldn't learn it in a book and then take a test on it, I didn't want anything to do with it.

Bea_Minus

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #66 on: October 17, 2015, 11:10:41 AM »
We raised our kids in a "bad" school district, low test scores, many non-English speaking households, etc.  My daughter scored 1040 on her SATs and graduated college.  She now has a $60K/year job.  My son graduated HS, got training as a truck driver, makes $72K a year.  It's the support at home that counts.  If the parents push education, the kids will succeed.

seemsright

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Re: stuck in a bad school district
« Reply #67 on: October 18, 2015, 02:54:03 PM »
If you ask around you will find a ton of opinions about schools. I happen to live in a poor opinion school district. My daughter is in Kinder. I went in as a momma bear. I was not going to take any thing less than perfect from this school. And come to find out 6 weeks into the school year they really stepping up and doing what my daughter needs. Including a ton of extra testing and trying to figure out what grade she should be in. They are rewriting rules and doing things they have never done before. And my daughter is excited.

I have no problem with this school. In my daughters case I view her schooling as just schooling. In the grand scheme to things it wont matter. I could pay for private school...but I do not feel like it would be any better. I thing being able to help pay for college is way more important.