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Learning, Sharing, and Teaching => Ask a Mustachian => Topic started by: chris316 on April 28, 2017, 10:28:37 AM

Title: Stealth Camper
Post by: chris316 on April 28, 2017, 10:28:37 AM
Me and my girlfriend love going on road trips and camping for vacationing. I saw on an earlier thread people spend upwards of 10k a year on vacations! Crazy...

We have an 05 Chevy cobalt that gets 30+ miles per gallon. I'd say per year we go on 6-10 camping/road trips including 1 9-10day trip. Together it's less than 2k a year....

Driving a coupe makes finding camp grounds on the road tough when late and driving long hours....
I thought buying a mini-van with putting a full mattress in the back would help make trips much more comfortable. Although I understand the tradeoff of gas mileage...
also in using the van for utility and errands during weekdays and such maximizes it's use.

Does anyone have advice on the best type of mini-van? Is it worth it? Or can anyone share road trip tips on budgets or anything along these lines?
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: nereo on April 28, 2017, 10:47:40 AM

Does anyone have advice on the best type of mini-van? Is it worth it? Or can anyone share road trip tips on budgets or anything along these lines?
While not popular on these boards, compact pickups with a full bed and a camper shell are incredible for this kind of traveling.  With some basic carpentry you can build a full-sized sleeping platform with tons of lockable storage underneath.  It's always ready - no need to find a spot and pitch a tent.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: bigalsmith101 on April 28, 2017, 11:08:56 AM
Any old van will do it for you. Dodge Grand Caravans are great as they have Stow-and-go seating. All the rear seats fold into the floor, making camping very easy. Still get about 24mpg with the V6 motor, and run forever! 2010 models can be had for relatively cheap and with low miles. https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/6105892138.html
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: boarder42 on April 28, 2017, 11:18:32 AM
to add some luxury to your travel you could add in travel hacking we spent 10 days in hawaii and all of this was free

1. 5 star hotels
2. jeep rental car
3. first class flights

Some of my trips that would cost over 10k cost less than our camping trips due to travel hacking.. we love camping and traveling of all kinds.  lots of fun can be had for free in multiple ways.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: gaja on April 28, 2017, 11:26:27 AM
We do our travelling in an electric campervan. The bed and other equipment is easy to put in and take out, so this is also the car we use for everything else. My blog has details, or you could ask.

The expensive parts of the setup is
-The van itself is relatively costly; we had to get a fairly new one since electric vans haven't been around that long.
-I don't want to talk about the cost of the solar panel. But it is the coolest solar panel ever, covering the entire roof without increasing the wind resistance, so no regrets.
-The small sized and very energy efficient fridge was not easy to find, so the price was accordingly.

The bedframe is mainly from materials we already had, except for some plywood. The matrass is simply taken from the bed in the house; we can only sleep in one at a time, so what is the point of having several? We had to buy drapes and a few boxes for storage, but those were cheap.

The running costs of a full electric van are the best. Especially in the Nordic countries, where electricity is cheap and a lot of countries and cities let you park for free, ride ferries for free, and don't always charge at toll roads.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: yyc-phil on April 28, 2017, 11:27:44 AM
Last fall, my wife, the cat and I took off on a road trip from Yellowknife to Mexico, and back this past March. Our set-up was pretty simple: a rooftop tent on an older 2004 X-Terra. The set-up was perfect because we were able to travel off-the-beaten path and camp in the middle of nowhere, but one disadvantage is that we could not just open up the tent and camp in the city or in a parking lot. For that, a small van or a pick-up truck with a topper, equipped with a simple sleeping platform under which you can store bins and other equipment, would have been better. That's what we are planning to get for our next road trip back to Mexico and Central America in the fall. Right now, we are looking at older Nissan Frontier or Tacoma 4x4, or even a Ford Ranger 4x4. An older Econoline camper van is also a good choice. While we were camping in Mexico, we met two couples from Quebec who had purchased those 1980-90s fully equipped campervans for under $3,000 CDN. They are easy to repair, parts are cheap, and while gas mileage is not the greatest, they offer a lot of comfort in a small package.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: chris316 on April 28, 2017, 11:38:55 AM
Any old van will do it for you. Dodge Grand Caravans are great as they have Stow-and-go seating. All the rear seats fold into the floor, making camping very easy. Still get about 24mpg with the V6 motor, and run forever! 2010 models can be had for relatively cheap and with low miles. https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/6105892138.html


Nice, yes I was thinking a 2002-2007 grand caravan... biggest interior volume with best gas milage....
I've also thought about a Honda Odyssey or a Toyota sienna.... those two seem to be built like tanks and retain value with a few extra luxury items (sunroof, heated seats, dvd, awd, tow hitch, ect)

Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: chris316 on April 28, 2017, 11:40:40 AM
to add some luxury to your travel you could add in travel hacking we spent 10 days in hawaii and all of this was free

1. 5 star hotels
2. jeep rental car
3. first class flights

Some of my trips that would cost over 10k cost less than our camping trips due to travel hacking.. we love camping and traveling of all kinds.  lots of fun can be had for free in multiple ways.


Man.... this has scam written all over it.... dare I ask you to explain?
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: bigalsmith101 on April 28, 2017, 11:51:52 AM
Any old van will do it for you. Dodge Grand Caravans are great as they have Stow-and-go seating. All the rear seats fold into the floor, making camping very easy. Still get about 24mpg with the V6 motor, and run forever! 2010 models can be had for relatively cheap and with low miles. https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/6105892138.html


Nice, yes I was thinking a 2002-2007 grand caravan... biggest interior volume with best gas milage....
I've also thought about a Honda Odyssey or a Toyota sienna.... those two seem to be built like tanks and retain value with a few extra luxury items (sunroof, heated seats, dvd, awd, tow hitch, ect)

The Sienna and Odyssey are also great vans, and 200k+ miles on them is common. Consider the likely mileage you'll put on the van, and the cost, and you'll come out with a best case scenario for you. The Grand Caravan has the highest rated towing capacity (if I'm not mistaken). AWD in the Sienna will drop fuel economy, and you don't really need it. DVD? Heated Seats? Sunroof? You have those in your coupe now?
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: boarder42 on April 28, 2017, 11:55:57 AM
to add some luxury to your travel you could add in travel hacking we spent 10 days in hawaii and all of this was free

1. 5 star hotels
2. jeep rental car
3. first class flights

Some of my trips that would cost over 10k cost less than our camping trips due to travel hacking.. we love camping and traveling of all kinds.  lots of fun can be had for free in multiple ways.


Man.... this has scam written all over it.... dare I ask you to explain?

its not a scam its common place around here.  Many many people do this

essentially you sign up for credit cards to get the sign up bonuses.  Some use the credit card as their daily spender for 3 months to meet the minimum spend requirements
But others like myself find that too slow so their are ways to Manufacture spending as well <-- this part seems a little scammy but its not too bad once you get your feet wet a couple times.

Check out TravelMiles101.com they are a couple mustachians who put together a great course for it.  there is a facebook group for it as well where you can ask specific questions.  But warning.  once you start its addicting.  We went on a 14 day europe cruise with balcony and drinks for 2 for around 1500 total out of pocket including flights shore excursions hotels etc.

Its real its doable its awesome.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: yyc-phil on April 28, 2017, 12:17:25 PM
Or can anyone share road trip tips on budgets or anything along these lines?

We drove 25,000 km on our last road trip. We took 6 weeks to cross the US Southwest and boondocked on BLMs in the most beautiful and secluded places on earth (think Grand Canyon but free, and without anyone around for miles and miles of wilderness), with a cheap hotel stay every 7-10 days to stock up on provisions, wash up a bit, and recharge our batteries, literally and figuratively. We have no fridge or running water, just a simple useless cooler and a 5-gallon water jug for drinking, cooking and a daily "sponge-bath". Free refills at most gas-stations. We cooked on a little camping stove most of the time, with the occasional sit-down meal for a special occasion (wife's birthday, anniversary). Overall, with careful planning, we spent less on food than what we would have spent at home.

After the US Southwest, we then crossed into Mexico where we spent the rest of the winter, boondocking on desert beaches, mountain roads, sierras, secluded river banks, and little pueblos. In December, we rented a nice little basic apartment near the beach in a non-touristy village near Puerto Vallarta ($600 CDN per month all inclusive) so my wife and the cat could stay put while I traveled back to Canada for a couple of weeks in December. In Mexico, we crisscrossed the states of Durango, Sonora, Colima, Michoacan, Jalisco, Nayarit, San Luis Potosi, Guanajuato, Chihuahua a, Coahuila, and Nuevo Leon. Next fall, winter and spring, we are going back to explore Pueblo, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Campeche, Tabasco, Quintana Roo, Yucatan, and Guatemala and Belize. We are skipping Veracruz and Guerrero due to uncertainty about safety in those two states. Camping most of the time.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: nereo on April 28, 2017, 12:38:50 PM
We do our travelling in an electric campervan. The bed and other equipment is easy to put in and take out, so this is also the car we use for everything else. My blog has details, or you could ask.
...
-I don't want to talk about the cost of the solar panel. But it is the coolest solar panel ever, covering the entire roof without increasing the wind resistance, so no regrets.
Ok, went surfing through your blog and your adventures look AWESOME.  But I gotta ask about the solar panel - what makes it the coolest ever and was it a custom mod? I'm guessing it feeds back into the van's battery pack?
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: Bracken_Joy on April 28, 2017, 12:41:52 PM
Posting to follow. This is inspiring me to take our truck camping to the next level. Right now we just do plywood and sleeping bags under our canopy. A platform with storage would be awesome.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: HipGnosis on April 28, 2017, 01:05:38 PM
Dodge Grand Caravans are great as they have Stow-and-go seating. All the rear seats fold into the floor, making camping very easy. Still get about 24mpg with the V6 motor, and run forever!
I've thought of doing a version of that - I'd take the back seats out and use the 'stow' area for food and gear.    Perhaps with a rope and pulley system to lift the mattress for access.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: gaja on April 28, 2017, 01:06:20 PM
We do our travelling in an electric campervan. The bed and other equipment is easy to put in and take out, so this is also the car we use for everything else. My blog has details, or you could ask.
...
-I don't want to talk about the cost of the solar panel. But it is the coolest solar panel ever, covering the entire roof without increasing the wind resistance, so no regrets.
Ok, went surfing through your blog and your adventures look AWESOME.  But I gotta ask about the solar panel - what makes it the coolest ever and was it a custom mod? I'm guessing it feeds back into the van's battery pack?

The solar panel does not give us any range, only runs the heat, fridge, etc in the van. On the other hand, we no longer loose range to the heater or AC. I just like it because it fits so perfectly to the size of the roof, and I like the principle of only using renewables. The alternative would have been gas powered heat and fridge. Also, a lot of the ferries we use have a height limit of 190 cm. With a van that already was 185 cm, there was no way we could get a normal pv panel. The panel itself is bought online from a UK store, but it took us a while to figure out how to install it. Ended up with glue and aluminum side boards painted to match the car.

Also, if you are going for stealth, very few people notice this solar panel unless you point it out to them.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: zenyata on April 29, 2017, 03:16:12 PM
This is a fun topic.  We've vacationed a fair bit in rental mini-vans and they work great for hybrid camping (tent or under the stars when possible and in the van when necessary).  We just used therma-rest mattresses and sleeping bags and it was just great as a place to get some rest. Only restriction is that with other gear in the van - if you are closer to 6 ft tall it gets a bit dicey as far as having enough room to stretch out.

I'm curious about yyc-phil's reply - doing those long journeys with a cat amazes me. That was tentatively in our plans down the road and wondered if it was remotely feasible...I guess it is !
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: JLee on April 29, 2017, 05:38:21 PM
Last fall, my wife, the cat and I took off on a road trip from Yellowknife to Mexico, and back this past March. Our set-up was pretty simple: a rooftop tent on an older 2004 X-Terra. The set-up was perfect because we were able to travel off-the-beaten path and camp in the middle of nowhere, but one disadvantage is that we could not just open up the tent and camp in the city or in a parking lot. For that, a small van or a pick-up truck with a topper, equipped with a simple sleeping platform under which you can store bins and other equipment, would have been better. That's what we are planning to get for our next road trip back to Mexico and Central America in the fall. Right now, we are looking at older Nissan Frontier or Tacoma 4x4, or even a Ford Ranger 4x4. An older Econoline camper van is also a good choice. While we were camping in Mexico, we met two couples from Quebec who had purchased those 1980-90s fully equipped campervans for under $3,000 CDN. They are easy to repair, parts are cheap, and while gas mileage is not the greatest, they offer a lot of comfort in a small package.

I want to do this! So many people bring dogs but rarely do I see cats.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: yyc-phil on April 29, 2017, 07:56:14 PM
Last fall, my wife, the cat and I took off on a road trip from Yellowknife to Mexico, and back this past March. Our set-up was pretty simple: a rooftop tent on an older 2004 X-Terra. The set-up was perfect because we were able to travel off-the-beaten path and camp in the middle of nowhere, but one disadvantage is that we could not just open up the tent and camp in the city or in a parking lot. For that, a small van or a pick-up truck with a topper, equipped with a simple sleeping platform under which you can store bins and other equipment, would have been better. That's what we are planning to get for our next road trip back to Mexico and Central America in the fall. Right now, we are looking at older Nissan Frontier or Tacoma 4x4, or even a Ford Ranger 4x4. An older Econoline camper van is also a good choice. While we were camping in Mexico, we met two couples from Quebec who had purchased those 1980-90s fully equipped campervans for under $3,000 CDN. They are easy to repair, parts are cheap, and while gas mileage is not the greatest, they offer a lot of comfort in a small package.

I want to do this! So many people bring dogs but rarely do I see cats.

This couple who are currently traveling the Americas in their VW with their 3 cats really convinced us we could do it. We are hoping to meet up with them somewhere along the Panamericana next year. Some cats are easier than others. Ours travels very well but wants to taste freedom at every occasion he can get so we have to be extra-careful whenever we open a door. We had a couple of close calls but luckily he comes back like a bullet as soon as we shake his bag of treats, like in the commercial.

https://www.facebook.com/xinoxanolatinoamerica/
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: Thinkum on April 29, 2017, 10:16:33 PM
Hahahaha! I read this as "Stealth Camping" to which I thought "YEAH! Badass!" Although after reading all the replies, stealth campers are themselves badass. I always like the Ford Connect as a small "do everything" vehicle. I also liked the Honda Element with it's folding seats.

Story about stealth camping for your amusement and my street cred. Me and a friend took our first moto tour into AZ from CA a number of years ago. We got to the NP too late to get a camp site so we just pulled into a parking area, parked the bikes and set up camp behind some bushes in the dark while it sprinkled. All night we heard coyotes not too far and seen the headlights of cars going around the bend from the close by road. Stealth camping at it's best. Stealth campers would be MUCH better!
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on April 29, 2017, 10:33:00 PM
I recently read Bob Wells' book "how to live in a car, van, or RV." He gives great, organized info about how to "stealth vandwell", right down to model of vehicle per need, etc. He runs cheaprvliving.com  Highly recommend!
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: Gravel Guager on May 01, 2017, 11:35:09 AM
As I highly enjoy camping, I camp out to save during 600+ mile trips to work.  I always have a coleman stove in the back of my truck too to avoid eating out while traveling.   I pull over at a rest stop cook and nap so I guess I'm not that stealthy.  Its been my means to begin a 5 o'clock shadow here.  Whatever happened to a tent, coleman stove, sleeping bag, bed roll and a campfire?
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: nereo on May 01, 2017, 11:42:59 AM
As I highly enjoy camping, I camp out to save during 600+ mile trips to work.  I always have a coleman stove in the back of my truck too to avoid eating out while traveling.   I pull over at a rest stop cook and nap so I guess I'm not that stealthy.  Its been my means to begin a 5 o'clock shadow here.  Whatever happened to a tent, coleman stove, sleeping bag, bed roll and a campfire?
I love camping but I don't think they are mutually exclusive. There are serious advantages to van & pickup style camping - namely it can be done easily in urban/suburban areas, and/or without having to book and pay for expensive camp grounds.  It saves pitching a tent (something I normally enjoy but sucks when its pouring rain).
Ironically when we've gone 'stealth-camping' (as this thread calls it) we've always brought along a car camping tent too.  In nicer areas we pitch the tent. When the weather or reservations or locaiton didn't cooperate we had a comfy fallback.
YMMV
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: gaja on May 01, 2017, 12:35:25 PM

Does anyone have advice on the best type of mini-van? Is it worth it? Or can anyone share road trip tips on budgets or anything along these lines?
While not popular on these boards, compact pickups with a full bed and a camper shell are incredible for this kind of traveling.  With some basic carpentry you can build a full-sized sleeping platform with tons of lockable storage underneath.  It's always ready - no need to find a spot and pitch a tent.
This is the exact same set up I have and while it works well for camping (or hauling camping stuff like tents etc...) it's kind of a hassle for stealth camping compared to a van or even a small SUV. Much less head room and "floor to ceiling" space unless you have a tall shell, and unless you have a pass-thru window (I don't) or remove the truck's rear  window you have to get out of cab each time to get in back and vice versa. Out there in the weather, with the bears and the serial killers ;-).

Because of that I rarely stealth camp but would do it more if I had a van I could get full access to cab and cargo area without having to go outside. Plus as a single woman travelling alone its nice to know I can get to the front seat and drive away asap without having to go outside the vehicle from the bed, and unlock the front door of the cab to get away if needed. Or that someone can't break into the cab while I'm in back . I 've had my truck since 2007 and its great but would get a small van instead if I had to do it over again. I general tent camp though and the truck/shell/sleep and storage "carpet kit" combo is great for bring all my camping gear and toys like hike.

Travelling in remote, and statistically safe, areas, I have never worried about human predators. There are bears, but so far apart that they are not something I prepare for either. But during mosquito season in the far north, it is VERY nice to be able to pack everything up and crawl into the driver's seat without opening any doors.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: RetireAbroadAt35 on May 01, 2017, 01:16:15 PM
expeditionportal.com, drivetheamericas.com, and freecampsites.net are your friends.

There are so many options here, you've got to start narrowing your focus by understanding your requirements.

The best stealth vehicle is the one you already have.  I've seen people do this with civics, Chevy Astros, Mercedes Sprinters (pricey), and Honda Elements.  Personally, I'd got for an E-350 if I wanted a van.  Maybe one with a 4x4 conversion.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: nereo on May 01, 2017, 01:34:37 PM

In remote areas or even regular campgrounds I don't worry much about other humans but the few times I've pulled into a sparsely populated rest stop late at night and got in out and into the back of my truck to sleep I felt pretty conspicuous since anyone could see me (solo woman) doing it. Once had a couple drunk guys banging on my windows late at night while I slept in.the back of my truck at a somewhat isolated rest stop..
Creepy, and wildly inappropriate.  Thanks for sharing your perspective.  As an athethletic male of above average height these are issues that never cross my mind.

Usually my biggest worry is whether some state trooper will start tapping on the window with his/her flashlight.
True story:  I was once making a 10+ hour drive and I started to get really, really tired so I pulled into a rest stop (literally marked "Rest Stop") to get a couple hours of sleep.  Shortly after I closed my eyes there was a trooper tapping at my window.  I explained that I was tired and resting for a few hours. He told me "you can't sleep here - you have to keep driving until you find a hotel or something".
"But," I explained, "this is a rest stop, and the next town is like 40 miles away, and i pulled in because I was having trouble staying awake"
"That's not my problem sir" he told me, "you need to plan your drive better."

ok... guess I'll get behind the wheel even though can barely stay awake and hope I dont kill anyone officer. WTF.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: nereo on May 01, 2017, 02:01:55 PM

I think mostly its very safe, even for a solo woman, but I'm less likely to stealth camp now and try to get to a real camoground or even motel early so I don't have too. Boondocking though (Free camping in known places) is probably super safe.
sounds dumb, but I've actually found Walmart parking-lots to be decent places to stealth camp when driving cross-country.  Most are open 24hrs/day and have bathrooms.  Their parkinglots tend to be well lit with video cameras, and they actually welcome RVs/stealth campers etc.  Just sayin'.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: kandj on May 03, 2017, 12:35:11 PM
This is always a fun topic!
My husband and I have seriously considered doing this with a grand caravan or honda element, there are so many examples around the web. We are probably going the route of a yakima rooftop tent because we can get an amazing deal, but not very stealth or zero set up.
My dad actually has converted a couple work vans for this purpose. He recently bought a Ford Transit (it is his primary vehicle/work van) that they set up a queen mattress on a raised platform so there is storage underneath, he is working on figuring out how to better utilize the left over floor space for when the weather is bad or when they are in the van. He loves the height of the transit as they can stand up inside. They also at one point considered a suburban or Tahoe with some sort of roof raiser, forget what they are called but it added head height.
I'd say go for the caravan and keep tweaking your sleep and storage habits until you find something that works :) You can always add a roof top box if you need to, or get a quick set up tent/rain cover something for just out the door.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: boarder42 on May 03, 2017, 01:13:16 PM
how short do you have to be to stand up in a ford transit.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: yyc-phil on May 03, 2017, 01:24:32 PM
We are probably going the route of a yakima rooftop tent because we can get an amazing deal, but not very stealth or zero set up.

Check the reviews before getting a Yakima RTT. I had assumed given the name brand that they would receive good reviews but many reviews I read on REI mention problems with leaks and poor waterproofing. I have a Smittybilt RTT that I got from a Canadian distributor for $1300 last summer. We've used it every day for 6 months for a road trip from Yellowknife to Mexico and back, and we are very pleased with our purchase. However, as you pointed out, RTT are not very stealthy so we are still planning to use the RTT but we are looking at a different vehicle that would allow us to do some stealth camping here and there when using the RTT is not an option. We have an old Mitsubishi Delica 4x4 which is being rebuilt but we are not sure if we'd have enough space to sleep comfortably in it, especially with the cat and his litter box. Having 4x4 is a prerequisite for us so another more expensive option we are considering is to get a Ford E-350 4x4 or Chevy Express 2500 4x4 if we can find one in good condition but these are a bit pricey.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: JLee on May 03, 2017, 05:33:37 PM
We are probably going the route of a yakima rooftop tent because we can get an amazing deal, but not very stealth or zero set up.

Check the reviews before getting a Yakima RTT. I had assumed given the name brand that they would receive good reviews but many reviews I read on REI mention problems with leaks and poor waterproofing. I have a Smittybilt RTT that I got from a Canadian distributor for $1300 last summer. We've used it every day for 6 months for a road trip from Yellowknife to Mexico and back, and we are very pleased with our purchase. However, as you pointed out, RTT are not very stealthy so we are still planning to use the RTT but we are looking at a different vehicle that would allow us to do some stealth camping here and there when using the RTT is not an option. We have an old Mitsubishi Delica 4x4 which is being rebuilt but we are not sure if we'd have enough space to sleep comfortably in it, especially with the cat and his litter box. Having 4x4 is a prerequisite for us so another more expensive option we are considering is to get a Ford E-350 4x4 or Chevy Express 2500 4x4 if we can find one in good condition but these are a bit pricey.

https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/cto/6111957866.html
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: BCpuppy on May 03, 2017, 06:37:12 PM

Does anyone have advice on the best type of mini-van? Is it worth it? Or can anyone share road trip tips on budgets or anything along these lines?
While not popular on these boards, compact pickups with a full bed and a camper shell are incredible for this kind of traveling.  With some basic carpentry you can build a full-sized sleeping platform with tons of lockable storage underneath.  It's always ready - no need to find a spot and pitch a tent.

That is exactly what we have.  Its great for backcountry skiing and climbing.  Sometimes you really need 4 wheel drive.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: blahblahblah on May 03, 2017, 07:12:31 PM
Sounds like lots of fun on this thread!  While you work out the vehicle part, make sure you are taking advantage of all the free camping that BLM and Forest Service have.  I know this doesn't apply to most suburban areas but if you are on a road trip you could make some planning to end near National Forest or public land most days.  Also checkout freecampsites.net for some other options.
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: chris316 on May 03, 2017, 07:50:43 PM
Sounds like lots of fun on this thread!  While you work out the vehicle part, make sure you are taking advantage of all the free camping that BLM and Forest Service have.  I know this doesn't apply to most suburban areas but if you are on a road trip you could make some planning to end near National Forest or public land most days.  Also checkout freecampsites.net for some other options.

Super thumbs up to this. 
I know some rural small towns have campgrounds availible that are cheap or free and have a donation box availible to help with revenue...
Also state and national forest grounds can have some cheap or free camping availible but you have to check for exact specifics.

Does anyone have any other recomendations, resources, or good websites to check out regarding this topic?
Title: Re: Stealth Camper
Post by: yyc-phil on May 03, 2017, 09:37:43 PM
Sounds like lots of fun on this thread!  While you work out the vehicle part, make sure you are taking advantage of all the free camping that BLM and Forest Service have.  I know this doesn't apply to most suburban areas but if you are on a road trip you could make some planning to end near National Forest or public land most days.  Also checkout freecampsites.net for some other options.

Does anyone have any other recomendations, resources, or good websites to check out regarding this topic?

Your best friend for boondocking is the iOverlander ap which works off-line, and has user reviews for hundreds of camping spots. It links the coordinates of each sites to your mapping app and gives you detailed directions to the site. I also use free camping websites when I have internet but in the field, iOverlander is my essential app. Check it out.