Author Topic: Should I do a backdoor Roth?  (Read 677 times)

Unique User

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Should I do a backdoor Roth?
« on: July 27, 2018, 06:09:16 AM »
DH's company allows after tax contributions and in-service, non hardship distributions so I was going to have him call today to set that up and roll his traditional IRA into his 401k.  BUT, we are planning to quit in May of 2020 and now I am questioning this again.  Part of the reason I was thinking this was needed was to put more into our Roth (and use some of our cash if we need to) so it would not be considered for college contributions.  We were at Duke last week to visit, unlikely, but we are in NC so why not visit.  During the info session a slide included this bit of info - families with income of less than $60k pay $0 at Duke.  But the net price calculator showed that at $40k of income with our assets (cash heavy since we plan to sell two houses in 2020 and have a third fully paid rental house) we would still pay $35k ($53k with current income so not that much less without income).  We are late 40s/mid 50s in age, what are the other benefits to the backdoor Roth as opposed to cash or taxable investments at our ages?   

MDM

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Re: Should I do a backdoor Roth?
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2018, 09:12:52 AM »
Are you asking about a Backdoor Roth IRA, or a Mega Backdoor Roth, or both?

Unique User

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Re: Should I do a backdoor Roth?
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2018, 12:00:06 PM »
The Mega Back Door Roth.  Out AGI is low enough that we are able to contribute to a Roth already.  Sorry, I should have been more clear. 
« Last Edit: July 27, 2018, 12:10:11 PM by Unique User »

MDM

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Re: Should I do a backdoor Roth?
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2018, 02:07:58 PM »
The Mega Back Door Roth.
OK.  In that case, why "roll his traditional IRA into his 401k?"

That is a commonly used step for a backdoor Roth, but irrelevant to a mega backdoor.

The advantage of any Roth vs. any taxable investment is the "never pay taxes again" attribute of the Roth.

Unique User

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Re: Should I do a backdoor Roth?
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2018, 03:02:31 PM »
Thanks MDM, I called Fidelity and they explained that was a backdoor Roth need, not a mega backdoor Roth need.  I put in the highest percentage we could.  Wish I had done this sooner and wish my 401k plan was as generous as his.  It did not occur to me that taxable account meant I had to pay gains on earnings and Roth meant I paid no tax on earnings.  I was thinking short term since we retire in less than 2 years, I'm pretty slow. 

« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 09:45:46 AM by Unique User »