Author Topic: Running shoes  (Read 31926 times)

Cooperstown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #50 on: September 12, 2012, 04:17:09 PM »
I feel your pain on spending $100 every few months, but I haven't found a way around it yet.  I get pretty bad back pain if I don't use the right shoes.  That said I use Brooks Adrenaline which is far from a minimalist shoe.

grantmeaname

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #51 on: September 12, 2012, 07:39:22 PM »
That arrangement - with the base, sprints, and intervals - reminds me of training for cyclists.

igthebold

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #52 on: September 13, 2012, 06:31:28 AM »
I feel your pain on spending $100 every few months, but I haven't found a way around it yet.  I get pretty bad back pain if I don't use the right shoes.  That said I use Brooks Adrenaline which is far from a minimalist shoe.

I'm glad you're able to manage your pain. Back pain.. I just don't want to even approach that. :P

If barefoot style doesn't work out for me I'm going to take up a different form of exercise, perhaps cycling. My goal is to minimize cost, including the cost of injury.

Russ

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #53 on: September 13, 2012, 09:54:46 AM »
If barefoot style doesn't work out for me I'm going to take up a different form of exercise, perhaps cycling. My goal is to minimize cost, including the cost of injury.

Cycling costs me about $0.10/mile, fyi. This includes maintenance parts, depreciation, and health costs (zero, if you hurt yourself cycling you're doing it wrong). Does not include maintenance labor because I do all my own work, nor extra food costs because I'd be doing some other sort of exercise and eating the same amount anyway.

Perpetual_Student

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #54 on: September 13, 2012, 10:44:17 AM »
I run in Vibram 5 fingers.  I have like 4 or 5 pairs.  You can get them on sale online, but you do have to be a coupon hawk.  Retailmenot is a good place to stop before buying ANYTHING online.

I've gotten several pairs for half-price this way.  You want to make sure they fit well, though.  Maybe a stop at an REI to try pairs on and then buy online for cheaper.

Mr. Everyday Dollar

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #55 on: September 13, 2012, 11:07:21 AM »
Quote
How do you run without heels hitting first and instead land on the balls of feet?  Seems like it take reprogramming the brain/motion

I switched to Vibram FiveFingers a few years ago and believe me, you will adjust! I was always a heel-striker but try doing that barefoot or with FiveFingers and you'll figure out pretty quick it's not pleasant slamming your heel into pavement!

Traditional running shoes really enable heel-striking where FiveFingers will more or less force you to run on the forefoot, which for me was a transition. Also, I found that it's a very light forefoot strike.

In any event, the transition should be slow. A mile here, a couple miles there, until the running form and your legs and feet adjust.

bogart

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #56 on: September 13, 2012, 11:32:54 AM »
If barefoot style doesn't work out for me I'm going to take up a different form of exercise, perhaps cycling. My goal is to minimize cost, including the cost of injury.

Another low-injury option:  the light blue college town in our area has frighteningly affordable (if you were to use them regularly and buy an annual membership) public pools.  I think the skate rink/pool complex in Hillsborough may be similarly affordable.  But depending which part of the NC Piedmont you're in, those may or may not be accessible; I don't know about other pools around here (Jordan Lake is free!  Chilly for swimming in winter, though).

igthebold

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #57 on: September 13, 2012, 11:36:26 AM »
Another low-injury option:  the light blue college town in our area has frighteningly affordable (if you were to use them regularly and buy an annual membership) public pools.  I think the skate rink/pool complex in Hillsborough may be similarly affordable.  But depending which part of the NC Piedmont you're in, those may or may not be accessible; I don't know about other pools around here (Jordan Lake is free!  Chilly for swimming in winter, though).

Hboro is in range, but impractical. I like swimming, but the cost of membership where I am is insane. The light-blue college town in question is a 20 minute drive from me, which would be an even longer bike ride, after which I've received the workout I was looking for in the first place! :)

bogart

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #58 on: September 13, 2012, 12:12:27 PM »

Hboro is in range, but impractical. I like swimming, but the cost of membership where I am is insane. The light-blue college town in question is a 20 minute drive from me, which would be an even longer bike ride, after which I've received the workout I was looking for in the first place! :)

Makes sense -- oh well! 

alizawill

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #59 on: August 20, 2014, 02:38:22 AM »
Nike shoes are the best option for you . You can get Nike shoes below $50 at http://www.wholesale-top-brands.com/
I've seen running shoes mentioned in passing, but I'm curious what others here have found. Running attracts me because it's a fairly minimal sport. I'm also trying to do a style (chi running) that reduces wear and tear on my body, and as such, thick, padded running shoes aren't the thing.

Anybody else do a minimal style of running? What kind of shoes do you use? My ideal shoe would cost $50 or less and last a long time.

I just can't stomach being forced to buy a $100 pair of shoes every few months. :P

BooksAreNerdy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #60 on: August 20, 2014, 08:00:02 AM »
My DH is a lifelong runner. Ran XC for University of Oklahoma. Has done several marathons (always placing), but mostly runs because his body and mind need it.

He tries to run daily and like to avg 50miles per week. He used to train around 70-100 miles/wk.

He runs in the shoes that support his body best. Nike equalon, acics 2100 series. We buy shoes on eBay for half price. I never spend more than $70 including shipping.

The advice on the minimalist shoes and training theories is funny, I'm sure it all works, but does anyone win marathons in vibram finger shoes?

I suppose there is a difference in the goals and motivations of a fitness jogger and a competitive runner. If you want to run, just use shoes that support your body and stride (pronate/suponate?), and run a lot of miles.

I recommend going to a local running store and getting fitted. Then you can order shoes off eBay after you have a few choices that seem to fit you.

Better Change

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #61 on: August 20, 2014, 12:04:51 PM »
running warehouse!  Figure out what make and model you like, and then grab a bunch of them when they go on sale (usually when the one-up on the model is being released).  I bought two pairs of Brooks Ravennas for my husband and myself (so 4 pairs of shoes) for about $60/pair.  That's a steal considering what Ravennas normally retail for....

Trudie

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #62 on: August 20, 2014, 03:30:07 PM »
I haven't read all of the posts here, but it seems like there's a bias toward certain types of shoes.  Perhaps I am a lone voice, but I don't think there is a "one size fits all" answer to this question.  I think it is important to be fitted by someone who can do a gait analysis and put you in a show that's best for your stride/gait/body mechanics.

Sometimes this costs money.  I think you should get fit by someone who knows their stuff, though, then find the same shoes from a cheaper source for repeat purchases.

I also don't recommend finding the cheapest shoes possible, not replacing them after their life is up, or forgoing them entirely.  Related to the latter point -- you very well may do okay with minimalist running, or you may not.  The jury is still out on this.

A person could legitimately argue that running shoes are waayyy too expensive, but don't be penny wise and pound foolish.  Within each type of shoe you can find some cheaper options, but cheap-EST isn't usually the best.  Still, even when I factor in my expensive running shoes and replacing them every 4-5 months (during really heavy training), it's still way cheaper than joining a gym.  It's a portable hobby that I can enjoy anywhere.  The best exercise is one you enjoy.  When you enjoy something you keep it up.  When you keep it up you reduce the chance of ending up at the doctor's office.  WIN-WIN-WIN.

There is no one "right way" to run.  You will get as many different opinions about distances, what your goals should be, how often to do it, etcetera.  Educate yourself from reliable sources (Runner's World, Jeff Galloway, Hal Higdon, Jenny Hadfield, etcetera.)  My advice for a beginner is to not do too much too soon.  I think running every other day is healthy and mixing in cross-training is important.  I am almost 44 and have been running for 6 years, most recently getting into longer distances (half marathons, currently training for a marathon).  I have learned what my body needs for recovery and nutrition, and that comes through trial and error.

Also, if you find getting started intimidating, the walk-run programs advanced by Jeff Galloway can be a good way to start.

Good luck.  I wish you well.

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #63 on: August 20, 2014, 03:44:20 PM »
I run minimal. And yes, I pay $100 for my shoes. My favorite thus far, Merrell's Mix Master Glove. Buy 1/2 - 1 size up to allow your toes room and not lose a toenail(s).

Maybe find them cheaper by trading in old shoes for a discount. Or find last year's model.

I've heard Alta Zeros are good.

I can't run non-minimalst because they hurt my knees everytime, every time. Even in expensive shoes. So I run flat and on trails. Scenery is better anyway. ;)

ruthiegirl

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #64 on: August 20, 2014, 04:29:37 PM »
I like running in Tevas.  Simple, slightly supportive and I don't run into problems with my toes.  I hike in them as well unless it is really wet and cold.

They seem low-tech and lean towards the minimal shoe style without enclosing my feet.  And I have been around many pairs of Vibrams and man-o-man, those things get stinky.  Tevas let my feet feel cool and comfy.

Like these: 
http://www.zappos.com/teva-hurricane-xlt-wavy-trail-insignia-blue

chasesfish

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #65 on: August 20, 2014, 04:46:02 PM »
I am a runner, but not the right guy to ask about saving money here.  I have a very wide foot, so the shoes I can pick from are few and far between.  I then fight foot injuries.

The best I've been able to do is buy the last model right when it goes on clearance and stock up.  I buy a $120 pair new and when they're discontinuing the model I can find it $50-$70.

Its not easy to spend that kind of money, but the pain of bad running shoes isn't worth it to me.

gildedbutterfly

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #66 on: August 20, 2014, 06:22:32 PM »
Ok, I'm going to chime in here, only because it seems like there are a lot of recreational runners here with some information, but not complete information.

Background: I'm an RRCA-certified running coach, a former competitive runner (ultramarathons), personal trainer, 500-ERYT, etc. I don't make my primary living as a fitness professional anymore (though I did a few years ago), but I am still very active in that community at make a good amount of side money (well into the 5 figures) at that job.

So, on to the information, if anyone's interested:

1) As one poster said, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to footwear when running. People's natural stride is different, and there are different types of shoes available for different types of runners. Most running stores will give you a "free" gait analysis, and then pressure you into buying expensive shoes from them. But you're smarter than that, right? RIGHT? You'll get your free analysis, take the info they give you with a "Thanks, let me think about it," and then find some last-season/last-year shoes appropriate for you online for far less.

2) Running is a Mustachian way to keep in shape. Having said that, please, please, please don't skimp on shoes or sports bras. Unless you're male. Then you can skimp on the sports bra. Bottom line, though: for the health and long-term financial benefits, spending $60-120 for shoes is well worth it to keep you out of injury.

3) The science on barefoot/minimalist running is not mixed. With the exception of "studies" with serious external validity issues that were funded by Vibram and a couple of other shoe companies, the science makes it clear that running barefoot or in minimal shoes INCREASES, not decreases, injury. The only exception to this is if you are running in (loose-ish) sand, when it is fine to go barefoot. (Side note: the minimal running movement came out of a strange bastardization of Chris MacDougall's book Born to Run, which highlighted ultrarunner Scott Jurek (NOT a minimalist/barefoot runner) and a tribe of runners who ran barefoot on sand. The "evolutionary" argument that we are meant to run barefoot discounts the fact that our forefathers who ran barefoot did so in a mostly sand environment, and certainly never on pavement.)

4) The science on forefoot landing (which is unrelated to minimalist shoes, contrary to their marketing materials) is more mixed. For a while, it seemed like it was a better option, injury-wise, but more recent data shows that might not be true. Specifically, the link between forefoot landing and lower injury incidents has only been empirically established with competitive collegiate runners, and some studies have shown that forefoot landing has a lower number of injuries, but the injuries that do occur with forefoot landers are more serious. There is, however, some data that forefoot landing will make you faster. (If you want to try forefoot landing, think about leaning forward from your ankles when running. Keep the rest of your body straight, but try to keep your feet under/behind you.)

5) If you are running, even recreationally, it is also in your best interest to do weight training and flexibility training to prevent injury. For weight training, I recommend basic core/lower body exercises (squats, deadlifts, Pilates 100s, etc). For flexibility, nothing beats King Pigeon pose in yoga. (Any of these variations: http://www.yogaoutlet.com/userfiles/Guide/image/Yoga/Yoga-One-Legged-King-Pigeon-Pose-300x350.jpg)

If anyone has other questions, feel free to PM me for advice. Or, if you think it's relevant to the entire class, post here and I'll try to check this thread and respond.

Hope that helps!

MBot

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #67 on: August 20, 2014, 07:45:01 PM »
For all my work in retail selling athletic shoes, two valuable pieces of money-saving advice I got: "foam density" and trail running shoes

Press the foam all around the shoe outsoles with a finger. The cheap stuff will squish easily and is often white. Denser foam is often darker or speckled colour and lasts longer. It's harder to press down.

Although they are a bit heavier, usually the most durable outsole will be a "trail running" shoe. They have good cushioning, and a little stability. Usually those have nice dense foam also. They work fine on a any surface and have better grip in the wet.

I've had great ones from New Balance. If you can run on trails and not pavement or concrete, it is easier on the shoes and your joints too.

Daisy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #68 on: August 21, 2014, 12:43:46 AM »
Iíve never been a runner. I was always the slow kid at the end of the line when we had to run in gym class. Iíve tried to take it up a few times and either get bored with it or start to feel some funny stuff in one or the other knee. Iím also so slow that walkers sometimes pass me. Iím more of an endurance athlete than someone focused on speed. The tortoise, not the hare.

I live close to the beach and love to walk on the flat, soft sand. I can do 5 miles on it - probably more if time wasnít a constraint. I do it barefoot. Iíve seen some people doing it with running shoes, but I donít even like to walk in the sand with flip flops. It seems like the shoe contorts this way and that over the uneven surface of the sand and might even be more harmful to the ankles. When barefoot, my foot can gradually conform to the sand surface and it is enjoyable. I think wearing shoes on sand might be more injury-prone, but I have no facts to support this, just my happy feet. As a side note, the sand is an excellent exfoliator for the feet.

I notice my calves get quite a workout when I walk on the sand. Iíve even tried jogging parts of it, and my knees never bother me. Compared to asphalt walking/running, I think it is a more natural workout. I guess my higher property taxes by being close to the beach results in unexpected savings in not needing to buy running shoes. ;-)

I would feel uncomfortable walking and running barefoot on asphalt. Your feet get really dirty and thereís chance of injury with broken glass or other things.

A friend of mine does trail running. Iím not sure you can do that barefoot. Iíve tried walking on a hard packed path along the beach which is topped with sand but also had fragments of shells Ė so I guess it is similar to trail running. I tried it barefoot once and got a blister on the bottom of my feet. This trail seems to be better with shoes on. In fact, after reading this thread I ran this trail tonight with some old shoes on and focused on landing on the balls of my feet and I had no pain running a lot longer than I usually do Ė yippee!!!

I have a question - If I ever want to train for long hikes (Machu Picchu, Camino de Santiago, Appalachian Trail), I would think the sand walking would be very helpful. But then I worry that my feet wonít be used to wearing hiking shoes and I could get blisters and stuff if jumping from sand walking to trail hiking. Any thoughts?

Spartana

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #69 on: August 21, 2014, 02:20:48 AM »
New Balance trail running shoes 'cause...well...I'm a trail runner. Average 40 to 50 miles/week - lots more if I'm training for an Ultra. They seem to support we well, do good in all trail conditions, and last a lot longer then minimalist shoes (which I am convinced are an evil plot by manufacturers to get us to buy expensive shoes more often!). I generally buy several pairs at once when I find them on sale, which is often at a discount place like Marshalls or TJ Maxx. If I can't find them there then I will splurge and get a pair at a sporting goods or running store.

For those of you who do barefoot running have you ever had problems with Planter Fasciitis? It's a problem with a lot of minimalist runners I know as well as regular people who walk barefooted or in flat shoes like flip flops.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 02:25:49 AM by Spartana »

Spartana

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #70 on: August 21, 2014, 02:30:38 AM »
Hey Daisy - Sand walking is a great muscle builder for the legs (and us beach volleyball players know :-)!) and also a great endurance builder but the motion thru the sand is way different then walking on a flat hard surface like a trail. Kind of move the hip and legs different and scrunch up the toes, etc... So if you want o get "foot ready" for a long hike I think you'd have to practice in hiking shoes for the best results. I'd still do the sand walks as they are really great but hit the trails in your boots! You might like trail running shoes better then hiking boots - less sturdy but much more comfortable.

JoshuaSpodek

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #71 on: August 21, 2014, 08:42:03 AM »
I've used a couple pair of Vivo Barefoot Ultra Pure shoes -- http://www.amazon.com/Vivobarefoot-Mens-Ultra-Pure-Shoe/dp/B009LHZRVU/ref=pd_sbs_shoe_1 -- that are minimal. I got them for $37 per pair.

For runs over 15 miles the balls of my feet hurt if I use them. I started using these Merrells, which I got at an outlet store for about $50 -- http://www.amazon.com/Merrell-Mens-Access-Trail-Running/dp/B00E8AOYCS/ref=pd_rhf_dp_s_cp_2_64AT?ie=UTF8&refRID=1KNKBP4Q2S9853H70V38 -- and they work great. I did a 20-mile run in them the other day and 18.5 a couple weeks ago and they were great.

Daisy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #72 on: August 21, 2014, 06:18:38 PM »
Hey Daisy - Sand walking is a great muscle builder for the legs (and us beach volleyball players know :-)!) and also a great endurance builder but the motion thru the sand is way different then walking on a flat hard surface like a trail. Kind of move the hip and legs different and scrunch up the toes, etc... So if you want o get "foot ready" for a long hike I think you'd have to practice in hiking shoes for the best results. I'd still do the sand walks as they are really great but hit the trails in your boots! You might like trail running shoes better then hiking boots - less sturdy but much more comfortable.

I figured you need to train in the shoes you will use.

I usually have big issues with shoes because I have narrow feet. I went to a running store once to have them suggest a shoe and took my thick socks with me. The lady said I shouldn't be using thick socks with running shoes. But then she tried almost every shoe in the store and analyzed my walk and came to the conclusion that in my particular case I should use thick socks. Sigh...

Same thing when I went shopping for skates. At least the store had one particular pair that was for narrow feet. The lady at first dissuaded me from trying it on because it was super-narrow. I put them on and was in heaven! It makes a big difference because I can't control the shoe if it's too wide for me.

Any suggestions for running or trail shoes for narrow feet? I went to an REI store once and another customer suggested a brand but I can't remember the name. I think French or Italian brands are better - at least they were for my cycling shoes.

Unfortunately, I don't think I will be able to find running or trail shoes for myself at the discount stores. :-(

gildedbutterfly

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #73 on: August 21, 2014, 06:38:42 PM »
Any suggestions for running or trail shoes for narrow feet?

I have average width feet, and I use Brooks for running and New Balance for trail hiking/running, which are brands that are IMO the best brands as far as working with most people's gaits. However, I have had clients with narrow feet who have had good luck with Mizuno shoes, another solid brand, so you might want to try them.

Daisy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #74 on: August 23, 2014, 01:56:17 AM »
Any suggestions for running or trail shoes for narrow feet?

I have average width feet, and I use Brooks for running and New Balance for trail hiking/running, which are brands that are IMO the best brands as far as working with most people's gaits. However, I have had clients with narrow feet who have had good luck with Mizuno shoes, another solid brand, so you might want to try them.

Thanks, I will check out the Mizunos. I see they are Japanese shoes.

Would you suggest trail running shoes even for asphalt? I'd probably use them most on a hard-packed sand trail by the beach but was wondering how trail shoes performed on asphalt (my second choice of running surface).

DoubleDown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #75 on: August 23, 2014, 09:24:25 AM »
Another Big +1 for barefoot running. I've been at it for 6 years now (currently age 47) with no problems whatsoever. I'm not a fan of the "minimalist" shoes. I only wear something when it's too cold to go barefoot. In those cases, I wear a $10 pair of aqua socks I bought at Target 5 years ago, along with regular socks underneath.

Barefoot running made all my prior knee injuries go away. You don't need minimalist shoes to protect your feet; after a while, your soles will become as tough as moccasins, and feeling the ground is a big benefit compared to wearing shoes or anything else.

Jomar

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #76 on: August 23, 2014, 11:56:20 AM »
I think people are putting a little too much faith in forefoot striking on this forum. Running in this style is indeed more efficient and faster, but injury rates are no different- only the types of injuries are different. You are more likely to have issues with plantar fasciitis, stress fractures in the foot, achilles tendon issues, and calf issues running in a minimalist fashion, but less likely to suffer from runner's knee or have back issues. Part of the problem is that people who run with a heel-strike tend to try switching shoes before switching technique. Your best bet is to keep running in your crappy worn out sneakers and gradually switch technique. The other issue is that people tend to only consider forefoot strike and forget all the other components of technique (lean, cadence, hip and arm position, centre of gravity, for example). The other thing about the very minimalist shoes is that for most road runners, you will almost certainly not be able to run long distances on a regular basis on pavement without injury in them (different story if you run regularly on trails, maybe), especially if you're switching over from a heel-strike, unbalanced, low cadence running style (ie the style that most people use). I speak on this from experience- I have suffered from plantar fasciitis, had IT band issues, and suffered severe forefoot pain from major blood blisters that have formed in my forefoot from wearing barefoot shoes without a wide enough forefoot (not allowing my forefoot to splay out). All of this after I changed my technique. However, I've also improved my speed dramatically and have now focused on other components of my technique so that I'm confident I won't suffer from chronic injuries in the foreseeable future. Anyway, all this to say: be very careful! And for the record, I run in Altras and can't recommend them enough, my current pair was $65 on Amazon.

MBot

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #77 on: August 23, 2014, 12:48:31 PM »
I like trail shoes on asphalt just fine. I ran on one trail that had portions of asphalt on the newer sections, dirt/gravel on the rest. It was great!

MBot

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #78 on: August 23, 2014, 12:49:34 PM »
For narrow feet Google "narrow foot lacing shoes" and you'll get some suggestions that help too.

DoubleDown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #79 on: August 23, 2014, 08:07:09 PM »
I think people are putting a little too much faith in forefoot striking on this forum. Running in this style is indeed more efficient and faster, but injury rates are no different- only the types of injuries are different. You are more likely to have issues with plantar fasciitis, stress fractures in the foot, achilles tendon issues, and calf issues running in a minimalist fashion, but less likely to suffer from runner's knee or have back issues. Part of the problem is that people who run with a heel-strike tend to try switching shoes before switching technique. Your best bet is to keep running in your crappy worn out sneakers and gradually switch technique. The other issue is that people tend to only consider forefoot strike and forget all the other components of technique (lean, cadence, hip and arm position, centre of gravity, for example). The other thing about the very minimalist shoes is that for most road runners, you will almost certainly not be able to run long distances on a regular basis on pavement without injury in them (different story if you run regularly on trails, maybe), especially if you're switching over from a heel-strike, unbalanced, low cadence running style (ie the style that most people use). I speak on this from experience- I have suffered from plantar fasciitis, had IT band issues, and suffered severe forefoot pain from major blood blisters that have formed in my forefoot from wearing barefoot shoes without a wide enough forefoot (not allowing my forefoot to splay out). All of this after I changed my technique. However, I've also improved my speed dramatically and have now focused on other components of my technique so that I'm confident I won't suffer from chronic injuries in the foreseeable future. Anyway, all this to say: be very careful! And for the record, I run in Altras and can't recommend them enough, my current pair was $65 on Amazon.

I think those are all legitimate concerns, but also all attributable to trying to do anything too much, too soon. As long as one gives themselves enough time to adjust, everything should be fine. It's like anything else -- you can't go from zero weightlifting to trying to bench 200 lbs., or trying to swim 1000 yards in open water without building up to it.

The other thing about the very minimalist shoes is that for most road runners, you will almost certainly not be able to run long distances on a regular basis on pavement without injury in them

I can't speak to the minimalist or (oxymoronic) "barefoot shoes", but there are many barefoot runners who run marathons and more. I'm nowhere near that level, but I've always been able to run barefoot as far as I used to run with shoes. I've run a half marathon barefoot on pavement and asphalt and was no worse for wear. But when I used to run in traditional running shoes, I developed knee injuries that were going to permanently end my running career (and the ortho doctor told me my running days were over in my late 30's). Now, in my mid-late 40's I'm running better than ever thanks to switching to barefoot (and FWIW, I land somewhere around mid foot or a little forefoot).

Suit

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #80 on: August 23, 2014, 08:11:43 PM »
I don't wear minimalist shoes. What I did is I got fit at a running store for the appropriate shoes and once the first pair was wearing out I googled the brand and model of shoe and found a store trying to dump old inventory and got the next few pairs for cheaper than the first.

DoubleDown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #81 on: August 25, 2014, 04:13:54 PM »
Since several people have asked about the technique for running barefoot (or for "minimalist" shoes), here's how I learned it:

1. Stand tall with your feet about hips' width apart. Keep your body erect, and your head up. Bend your knees slightly so that your weight shifts to the front of your feet. This is the position you will run in.

2. Relax

3. Run gently, taking small and quick steps. Think about lifting each foot for the next step as soon as it strikes the ground. Run with a cadence of 180 - 220 steps per minute. To increase speed, first increase the cadence before taking longer strides.

4. Stay erect with your head up as you run, and lead with your hips. Lean forward gently only as needed to climb hills.

Bonus Tips:

1. Don't worry so much about how your foot lands. Just let your feet relax, run gently and with your knees slightly bent so that you naturally land on your forefoot or mid-foot.

2. Keep your arms to your side with elbows bent no more than 90 degrees. Thumbs should be pointing forward so your arms are moving forward and back, not across your body.

3. Start slowly. You will be using muscles that you have not used previously, and your feet won't be used to it. Take time to build up and after a couple of months you'll be able to go as far as you want. You might want to start on grass or sand, then work up to asphalt and pavement. Or take walks barefoot on pavement until your soles toughen up a bit.

4. Ideally your feet will land directly in front of you, as though you were running on a line painted on the ground.

5. Keep your feet moving quickly so you aren't plodding along.

6. Scan the ground out ahead of you for any sharp or dangerous objects, although as your feet get toughened up it won't matter much what you step on.

7. Don't worry about your feet getting gross, because they won't. The soles of your feet won't be hard, they will be like soft leather or suede. Your feet, Achilles tendons, and calves will also get incredibly strong, your arch will lift and you may go down a size or two in shoe size because of your lifted arch.

8. Although this style of running may feel unnatural at first, it is the way we were "Born To Run." We have learned bad running habits because of padded running shoes, and it may take a couple of weeks to undo the lifetime habits. After a little while of running barefoot, you will wonder why the hell you ever ran in shoes.

Daisy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #82 on: August 26, 2014, 10:54:24 PM »
So I ventured out on my second running attempt with the forefoot running technique, and it was another success!

I tried a different surface this time. It was an asphalt walking path around a lake. I walked on the asphalt to warm up, then ran alongside the path on the grass. The grass was barely cut so the long blades and stuff added a lot of resistance, but landing on the grass felt soft and non-jarring. However, a few times I had to go to the asphalt and running on that just felt more jarring on the legs.

I was wearing really old running shoes that are probably somewhat worn out because I've had them for years and have used them in the weight room. And I felt no pain in the feet, calves, or knees. I ran a further distance that I could have with my previous running technique.

Thanks all! Now I just need to find me some narrow shoes that don't require me to use really thick socks.

As far as the comment on barefoot running getting the bottoms of your feet all leathery and stuff, that just doesn't sound too attractive on a woman. I'm always using the pommel stone to smooth out the bottoms of my feet. If I took up barefoot running, would I be constantly fighting this need to smooth out the rough foot soles?
« Last Edit: August 26, 2014, 11:10:36 PM by Daisy »

DoubleDown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #83 on: August 27, 2014, 07:50:50 AM »
As far as the comment on barefoot running getting the bottoms of your feet all leathery and stuff, that just doesn't sound too attractive on a woman. I'm always using the pommel stone to smooth out the bottoms of my feet. If I took up barefoot running, would I be constantly fighting this need to smooth out the rough foot soles?

Hi Daisy,

Running barefoot will automatically take care of smoothing out the bottoms of your feet like your pommel stone does, you'll never have to use it again. Running on pavement or any other rough surface continually "sands" your feet. They don't get leathery in the gross sense; that is, tough, cracked, and hard. Instead, they get like extremely smooth, soft, and supple fine leather. Sometimes the soles of my feet feel as smooth as glass. You won't be disappointed in the results, your feet will be the best condition ever.

johnhenry

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #84 on: August 27, 2014, 08:06:49 AM »
Ok, I'm going to chime in here, only because it seems like there are a lot of recreational runners here with some information, but not complete information.

Background: I'm an RRCA-certified running coach, a former competitive runner (ultramarathons), personal trainer, 500-ERYT, etc. I don't make my primary living as a fitness professional anymore (though I did a few years ago), but I am still very active in that community at make a good amount of side money (well into the 5 figures) at that job.

So, on to the information, if anyone's interested:

1) As one poster said, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to footwear when running. People's natural stride is different, and there are different types of shoes available for different types of runners. Most running stores will give you a "free" gait analysis, and then pressure you into buying expensive shoes from them. But you're smarter than that, right? RIGHT? You'll get your free analysis, take the info they give you with a "Thanks, let me think about it," and then find some last-season/last-year shoes appropriate for you online for far less.

2) Running is a Mustachian way to keep in shape. Having said that, please, please, please don't skimp on shoes or sports bras. Unless you're male. Then you can skimp on the sports bra. Bottom line, though: for the health and long-term financial benefits, spending $60-120 for shoes is well worth it to keep you out of injury.

3) The science on barefoot/minimalist running is not mixed. With the exception of "studies" with serious external validity issues that were funded by Vibram and a couple of other shoe companies, the science makes it clear that running barefoot or in minimal shoes INCREASES, not decreases, injury. The only exception to this is if you are running in (loose-ish) sand, when it is fine to go barefoot. (Side note: the minimal running movement came out of a strange bastardization of Chris MacDougall's book Born to Run, which highlighted ultrarunner Scott Jurek (NOT a minimalist/barefoot runner) and a tribe of runners who ran barefoot on sand. The "evolutionary" argument that we are meant to run barefoot discounts the fact that our forefathers who ran barefoot did so in a mostly sand environment, and certainly never on pavement.)

4) The science on forefoot landing (which is unrelated to minimalist shoes, contrary to their marketing materials) is more mixed. For a while, it seemed like it was a better option, injury-wise, but more recent data shows that might not be true. Specifically, the link between forefoot landing and lower injury incidents has only been empirically established with competitive collegiate runners, and some studies have shown that forefoot landing has a lower number of injuries, but the injuries that do occur with forefoot landers are more serious. There is, however, some data that forefoot landing will make you faster. (If you want to try forefoot landing, think about leaning forward from your ankles when running. Keep the rest of your body straight, but try to keep your feet under/behind you.)

5) If you are running, even recreationally, it is also in your best interest to do weight training and flexibility training to prevent injury. For weight training, I recommend basic core/lower body exercises (squats, deadlifts, Pilates 100s, etc). For flexibility, nothing beats King Pigeon pose in yoga. (Any of these variations: http://www.yogaoutlet.com/userfiles/Guide/image/Yoga/Yoga-One-Legged-King-Pigeon-Pose-300x350.jpg)

If anyone has other questions, feel free to PM me for advice. Or, if you think it's relevant to the entire class, post here and I'll try to check this thread and respond.

Hope that helps!

+1 to everything said here, very good advice.

I am an avid recreational runner who participates in several 5Ks during the year and 1 half-marathon per year.  I train with a larger group of runners who are much more serious and who participate in marathons, ultras, ironman triathlons, etc.  There were a few in that group who tried barefoot/minimalist running over the last few years because of it's popularity.  Every one of the runners in the group has abandoned barefoot running completely.  Several still have lightweight minimal shoes that they use in small doses on specific training days.

I'm bitterly frugal and over the (earlier) years I tried many cheap shoes.  I've also tried several more expensive ones, asics, saucony, brooks that were recommended based on my build, gate, pronation, etc.  I finally found that Asics Gel Nimbus is the model that works best for me, even though it's not the exact recommended shoe based on the factors I mentioned above.  I've gotten these as cheap as $80 and paid as much as $120.  Obviously every individual will need to find the shoe that works best for them, and unfortunately that may take some trial and error (but reading up on recommended shoe types is a good place to start).

Where price is concerned: I run 600-700 miles in these shoes and many of the cheaper ones over the years were only good for 300 or so.  As infrequently as new shoes are required, I'd gladly pay $150 if I thought it was the best fit.

Where cost is concerned: I have found that my shoes last much longer if I rotate 2 pair over a given period.  I usually look for last year's model when the new models arrive and try to get 2 pair of them at a time.  I live in a humid area and my feet sweat extensively.  I think it's allowing the shoes time to dry completely before the next use that is most beneficial.

Where training is concerned: everyone has different goals (longer distance, faster time, etc).  But as a general rule, please don't jump quickly into minimalist shoes or barefoot running, or even forefoot running.  My opinion is that focusing exclusively on any of those methods is not going to increase health or performance.  I do think mixing in some training of those types, in slowly increasing(but still small) amounts, can help performance.  Even if you are in great shape and run 50 miles per week, you are at greater risk of injury if you start out with a 5 mile run in minimal shoes.  Just work it in slowly.

Timmmy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #85 on: August 27, 2014, 08:54:54 AM »
I split my running between traditional running shoes for long distances (I'm training for my first marathon) and vibram five fingers for shorter training runs.  I've been very happy with both but I will say that the vibrams seem to last forever. 

Side note: I'm a crossfit junky and do most workouts barefoot.  Exceptions being anything involving running outside and double unders, those I do in vibrams.  So I feel like my feet are well conditioned to being barefoot but I still have to be careful when running. 

Running in minimalists shoes or barefoot IS good for your body.  Jumping in full speed and not allowing your body to slowly adapt is the dangerous part.  It took me a long time to get used to running in vibrams.

Whatever you do, take it slow and pay attention to how your body feels. 

Daisy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #86 on: August 27, 2014, 07:39:27 PM »
As far as the comment on barefoot running getting the bottoms of your feet all leathery and stuff, that just doesn't sound too attractive on a woman. I'm always using the pommel stone to smooth out the bottoms of my feet. If I took up barefoot running, would I be constantly fighting this need to smooth out the rough foot soles?

Hi Daisy,

Running barefoot will automatically take care of smoothing out the bottoms of your feet like your pommel stone does, you'll never have to use it again. Running on pavement or any other rough surface continually "sands" your feet. They don't get leathery in the gross sense; that is, tough, cracked, and hard. Instead, they get like extremely smooth, soft, and supple fine leather. Sometimes the soles of my feet feel as smooth as glass. You won't be disappointed in the results, your feet will be the best condition ever.

Oooh...I have a strange fetish to touch the bottom of your feet now. You make it sound lovely.

Sorry if this is inappropriate. Maybe it will get deleted by the moderators.

DoubleDown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #87 on: August 28, 2014, 03:07:08 PM »

Oooh...I have a strange fetish to touch the bottom of your feet now. You make it sound lovely.

Sorry if this is inappropriate. Maybe it will get deleted by the moderators.

Well hey now! I hope it doesn't get deleted.


3) The science on barefoot/minimalist running is not mixed. With the exception of "studies" with serious external validity issues that were funded by Vibram and a couple of other shoe companies, the science makes it clear that running barefoot or in minimal shoes INCREASES, not decreases, injury.

Hmmm -- this posting seems to have been deleted, but I'd be interested in seeing any of this "clear science." Since this claim contradicts everything I have read (and my own experience), I did a Google search on "barefoot running science" and "barefoot running vs. shoes" to see if there is some new information. In both searches, all of the first page results returned studies that said in more cases than not, barefoot running results in less force that may protect against injury. Or they said the science is unclear that running in shoes is better than going barefoot. I did not cherry pick these results and anyone can do their own search, but here are a couple of citations that came up:

Quote
Kinematic and kinetic analyses show that even on hard surfaces, barefoot runners who forefoot strike generate smaller collision forces than shod rear-foot strikers. The difference is primarily due to a more plantar-flexed foot at landing and more ankle compliance during impact. This decreases the effective mass of the body when it collides with the ground. Fore- and mid-foot strike running gaits were probably more common when humans ran barefoot or in minimal shoes. This may protect the feet and lower limbs from some of the impact-related injuries now experienced by a high percentage of runners.

http://breakingmuscle.com/running/the-pros-and-cons-of-barefoot-running-what-the-research-says

Quote

He [Dr. Lieberman] believes that while cushioned, high-heeled running shoes may be comfortable, they limit the amount one can feel the ground, making it harder to mitigate impact, and easier for runners to land on their heels. He goes on to say that running shoes may weaken foot muscles and arch strength through reliance on arch supports and stiffened soles and that this weakness itself may contribute to Ďexcessive pronationí and plantar Fasciitis.

Both Dr. Lieberman and his colleagues, along with Dr. William L. Jungers who published a biomechanical editorial in this issue of nature (which weíll be reviewing shortly) entitled ĎBarefoot running strikes backí agree that more study is necessary on injury rates between barefoot runners and their shod compatriots.

http://runbare.com/389/new-study-by-dr-daniel-lieberman-on-barefoot-running-makes-cover-story-in-nature-journal

Quote
It has also been found that running in conventional running shoes increases stress on the knee joints up to 38%, although it is still unclear if this leads to a higher rate of heel injuries or not.[33][34][35] One study suggests that there is no evidence that cushioning or pronation control in shoes reduces injury rates or reduces performance.[36]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barefoot_running

enigmaT120

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #88 on: August 29, 2014, 10:56:35 AM »
It takes me forever to get my hammer toes into those toed shoes, so I quit messing with them.  I'd like to run barefoot some.  But I would have to start out by running a little way (half a mile at first?) then put my shoes on and finish my workout, as I almost never run less than 5 miles.  It's just not worth the time.  The trick will be to identify how far I can run barefoot, at first, without getting shin splints or some other injury. 

Do you barefoot runners do it on gravel roads?  I'm mostly a trail runner, but there is a lot of gravel, too.  And at home I run up the logging roads.




Daisy

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #89 on: September 23, 2014, 09:52:10 PM »
This forefoot landing technique has been such a blessing! I can run now without having knee pain. I am still using my old shoes, not barefoot, and it has worked.

The only issue is that I am still a slow runner. Especially with this forefoot landing it seems like I can't take long strides. What's the key in getting faster? I had fast walkers pass me today. I feel like I like the cadence I am at so I'm not sure if I should be increasing it.

Help me feel the need for speed!

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #90 on: September 24, 2014, 01:20:41 AM »
I'm so baffled by this sudden culture of "must"s in exercise. My SO is studying to be one of these people who prescribe how we should exercise or use our bodies and I still don't get it, even if I'm supportive of the field of study.

So anybody have fancy erudite thoughts on moccasins for running?

We've been running around for centuries upon centuries in very minimally supportive footwear. My favorite shoes for sprinty outdoors activity on uneven terrain have been a pair of leather ghillie moccasins - you can make them yourself, I'll link a tutorial I found on someone's blog in 2.2 seconds of Google effort. My particular pair has a tough outer sole applied (I bought them because I liked the people selling them - still going fine twelve years later) which could probably be accomplished with a piece of car mat or similar and contact cement. But the upshot of this sort of thing is it's basically a device to hold a shield to the bottom of your foot for pointy-rock-avoidant purposes; they don't change the way your foot hits the ground much, they're super-comfortable, they breathe well (they're sometimes called "bog shoes"), and you have the option of wearing a sock underneath when it's cold. Make with scrap leather and it's probably going to cost >$10.

I also think they're darn pretty on lady feet; they are still worn as dancing shoes in highland dancing.

http://earthandliving.blogspot.com/2008/08/viking-shoes-tutorial-sort-of.html

DoubleDown

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #91 on: September 24, 2014, 08:06:55 PM »
This forefoot landing technique has been such a blessing! I can run now without having knee pain. I am still using my old shoes, not barefoot, and it has worked.

The only issue is that I am still a slow runner. Especially with this forefoot landing it seems like I can't take long strides. What's the key in getting faster? I had fast walkers pass me today. I feel like I like the cadence I am at so I'm not sure if I should be increasing it.

Help me feel the need for speed!

That's excellent! Having a shorter stride is a good thing, it means you're doing it right. You'll find that your cadence should increase quite a bit from what you're used to. You'll get used to it soon enough though. You should target a minimum of 180 steps per minute. Anywhere from 180-220/minute is good. To increase your speed, increase your cadence and not your stride. Only when you start to get to 200+ steps/minute should you perhaps increase your stride.

If you're doing 180+ steps/minute, you'll be passing just about everyone, even with small steps. If you struggle to keep up with 180 steps/minute, take shorter steps.

If it helps you find the right cadence, you can find some songs you like that are 90-100 beats/minute and match your running cadence to those. It's not necessarily one of my favorites, but you might know that counting to "Staying Alive" is sometimes taught as the cadence for CPR at 100 beats/minute. If you don't run with an iPod or something, you can always think of that song in your head in order to get the right running cadence going!

TreeTired

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #92 on: September 24, 2014, 08:41:18 PM »
I bought a pair of xero sandals and tried to run in them and it didn't work for me.  Caused pain in my feet and calves.  I am tired of having to replace running shoes every few months when the heal wears out.  I usually buy some kind of Asics, pay in the $50 range.   I recently was at Walmart and bought a pair of Starter running shoes for $19.74.   They are light, comfortable and so far so good. 

BarbeRiche

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #93 on: December 17, 2015, 03:56:52 PM »
Do some of you guys run during winter? 

If so, what kind of shoes are you using?  I will most likely go with a minimalist type of shoe, but with winter in Canada, I was wondering if it was fit for cold and lots of snow.

Something like : http://us.vibram.com/shop/fivefingers/men/outdoor/trek-ascent-insulated/M53.html?dwvar_M53_color=Tan%20%2F%20Grey%20%2F%20Black

Or : http://www.amazon.ca/Mens-Salomon-Speedcross-silver-metallic-x/dp/B004LB4V72/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450393845&sr=8-1&keywords=Salomon+Speedcross

« Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 04:17:06 PM by BarbeRiche »

Conjou

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #94 on: December 17, 2015, 04:46:28 PM »
There is an article in one of the most recent issues online of Trail Runner of how to give new life to old running shoes, DIY style. You should check it out.

BarbeRiche

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #95 on: December 17, 2015, 06:29:37 PM »
There is an article in one of the most recent issues online of Trail Runner of how to give new life to old running shoes, DIY style. You should check it out.

Thanks!  For those interested : http://www.trailrunnermag.com/component/content/article/22-trail-running-shoes/2000-5-ways-to-repair-trail-running-shoes

I do keep my shoes for a pretty long time.  My running shoes are beaten up, eaten by my dog and pretty dirty but I use them when it rains.
I have a minimalist pair for gym and everyday's shoes.

But would still like to invest in a pair that will keep my feet warm and dry for Canadian winter.

mustachianteacher

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #96 on: December 18, 2015, 04:48:03 PM »
Thanks.  I'll have to focus on it more than you suggest because everytime I run my heels hit first and hard, no matter how fast or slow I am going.  Also note that I am not a regular runner so maybe I just need to do it more.

Regular long-time runner here. The more you run, the more efficient your body mechanics will become over time. Many people, me included, start out as heel-strikers when they first get started. As you run more and farther, your body will fine-tune its adaptations to become ever more efficient, and you may eventually find that you have transitioned to land on your midfoot without even realizing it. (True story: I didn't realize I was landing on my midfoot until my daughter once took a slow-mo video of me running. Very educational 10 second video!)

Also, just throwing this out there in case it applies to you: Do not run exclusively on a treadmill. The biomechanics of treadmill running are very different than running outside on a variety of surfaces. I run on trails 90% of the time, which I love, but when I do occasionally run on the mill, I notice that I'm landing on my heels again rather than on my midfoot.

The Happy Philosopher

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #97 on: December 20, 2015, 01:54:23 PM »
Ok, I'm going to chime in here, only because it seems like there are a lot of recreational runners here with some information, but not complete information.

Background: I'm an RRCA-certified running coach, a former competitive runner (ultramarathons), personal trainer, 500-ERYT, etc. I don't make my primary living as a fitness professional anymore (though I did a few years ago), but I am still very active in that community at make a good amount of side money (well into the 5 figures) at that job.

So, on to the information, if anyone's interested:

1) As one poster said, there is no one-size-fits-all answer to footwear when running. People's natural stride is different, and there are different types of shoes available for different types of runners. Most running stores will give you a "free" gait analysis, and then pressure you into buying expensive shoes from them. But you're smarter than that, right? RIGHT? You'll get your free analysis, take the info they give you with a "Thanks, let me think about it," and then find some last-season/last-year shoes appropriate for you online for far less.

2) Running is a Mustachian way to keep in shape. Having said that, please, please, please don't skimp on shoes or sports bras. Unless you're male. Then you can skimp on the sports bra. Bottom line, though: for the health and long-term financial benefits, spending $60-120 for shoes is well worth it to keep you out of injury.

3) The science on barefoot/minimalist running is not mixed. With the exception of "studies" with serious external validity issues that were funded by Vibram and a couple of other shoe companies, the science makes it clear that running barefoot or in minimal shoes INCREASES, not decreases, injury. The only exception to this is if you are running in (loose-ish) sand, when it is fine to go barefoot. (Side note: the minimal running movement came out of a strange bastardization of Chris MacDougall's book Born to Run, which highlighted ultrarunner Scott Jurek (NOT a minimalist/barefoot runner) and a tribe of runners who ran barefoot on sand. The "evolutionary" argument that we are meant to run barefoot discounts the fact that our forefathers who ran barefoot did so in a mostly sand environment, and certainly never on pavement.)

4) The science on forefoot landing (which is unrelated to minimalist shoes, contrary to their marketing materials) is more mixed. For a while, it seemed like it was a better option, injury-wise, but more recent data shows that might not be true. Specifically, the link between forefoot landing and lower injury incidents has only been empirically established with competitive collegiate runners, and some studies have shown that forefoot landing has a lower number of injuries, but the injuries that do occur with forefoot landers are more serious. There is, however, some data that forefoot landing will make you faster. (If you want to try forefoot landing, think about leaning forward from your ankles when running. Keep the rest of your body straight, but try to keep your feet under/behind you.)

5) If you are running, even recreationally, it is also in your best interest to do weight training and flexibility training to prevent injury. For weight training, I recommend basic core/lower body exercises (squats, deadlifts, Pilates 100s, etc). For flexibility, nothing beats King Pigeon pose in yoga. (Any of these variations: http://www.yogaoutlet.com/userfiles/Guide/image/Yoga/Yoga-One-Legged-King-Pigeon-Pose-300x350.jpg)

If anyone has other questions, feel free to PM me for advice. Or, if you think it's relevant to the entire class, post here and I'll try to check this thread and respond.

Hope that helps!

+2
I've done a lot of running in my life and I'll chime in my 2c

1. Cheap shoes are OK for jogging a couple miles, but not serious running. I've tried dozens of shoes from various manufacturers over the years and I  have never been happy with $20-60 shoes.  I routinely spend $80-120 and am thrilled to pay it. PRO TIP: When you find a shoe you really love go online and get another pair at the end of the season for up to a 50% discount! Rotate the shoes for twice the longevity.

2. Running/jogging has an incredibly high rate of injury. It seems so nice and gentle but don't be fooled. Don't over train.

3. Minimalist running sounds great when you read a book like Born To Run, but I'm not sure you can apply those principals to the general population. Tribes of barefoot runners are genetically similar and the ability to run this way is actually a trait that is selected for. I experimented a little and actually liked it. My advice: go SLOW! No more than 1/2 mile increase per run. If you go run 5 miles barefoot with no practice yo will likely be unable to walk for days (not that I would ever do anything like this *cough, cough).

4. Heel/midfoot/forefoot strike is controversial. Everyone had different mechanics. Injuries tend to occur when one tries to quickly change their running style. Go slow.

5. I like the book Lore of Running by Noakes. Great review of the science and studies of running. May be a little dated, don't know if there is a newer version.

6. Core strength goes a long way in preventing injury, improving form and running faster. I'm at my best running 3 days a week with strength and flexibility work on off days.

Now get out there and run! It's awesome!

wealthviahealth

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #98 on: December 21, 2015, 06:50:20 AM »
I was just thinking about this too. Just bought a pair for $120 and came to realization these wont last too long now that I am doing greater distances. Here is my idea to offset. Since cross training has been shown to be extremely synergistic, I plan to spend more tine training on my bike so I can decrease miles put on shoes.
I am also buying shoes that I would enjoy wearing around in most settings once they are "retired" from running.
 

golden1

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Re: Running shoes
« Reply #99 on: December 21, 2015, 07:35:05 AM »
I did spend $100 on my last pair of running shoes, but they have lasted me two years.  I don't run high mileage though, maybe 10-12 miles a week on average.