Author Topic: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?  (Read 9878 times)

TrMama

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Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« on: October 02, 2014, 11:59:58 AM »
Any suggestions for cheap racks, or adapters, that would allow me to put a rack on my fancy road bike? I've only been able to find racks in the $200 range. That seems like a crazy amount.

Stats:

- I already own a basic rack that mounts to standard braze ons.
- My commuter looks like this, http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/9096436/. It does not have braze ons. It's a carbon frame, aka braze ons cannot be added.
- Ideally, I'd like some sort of conversion bracket that allows me to connect the bottom of the rack to the wheel skewer (axle).
- I'm not interested in a seat post mounted rack. I want to be able to carry more weight/volume than these allow.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2014, 12:13:09 PM »
I think that you're asking for trouble trying to carry heavy weight on a fancy road bike.  The carbon frame will probably stand up to it, but I bet you have very low spoke count wheels that will not handle the weight very well.  Race frames have chainstays that are very short, so if you do get something that lets you mount panniers back there, you'll probably be kicking the bags with your heels as you pedal.

You could try something like a frame bag:


I think your best bet for lots of weight and space would be to pull a trailer though.

That way the weight isn't on the delicate wheels or frame.

Russ

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2014, 12:54:59 PM »
I think that you're asking for trouble trying to carry heavy weight on a fancy road bike.  The carbon frame will probably stand up to it, but I bet you have very low spoke count wheels that will not handle the weight very well. 

The carbon frame will *definitely* stand up to it, as they are tested to standards identical to or exceeding those of metal frames. The wheels will hold up just fine, especially considering OP + max rack load will still be lighter than many riders alone.

sauce: I work with a few hundred people who commute on carbon fiber wunderbikes and fancy lightweight wheels, many of them with racks of some sort. Also plenty of personal experience loading up my 18H front / 24H rear with close to 275 lbs me + bike + gear, then rumbling down washboard National Forest Service roads.

Quote
Race frames have chainstays that are very short, so if you do get something that lets you mount panniers back there, you'll probably be kicking the bags with your heels as you pedal.

Except that small people bikes have the same chainstay length as big people bikes, while small people have smaller feet that allow heel clearance at that length. Aside, there are plenty of bag options that accommodate for this.

Quote
You could try something like a frame bag:

ew gross

Most peeps at work use one of these, mostly because they're cheap when you don't have to pay retail. I'm sure there is a cheaper/better option somewhere but at least this isn't $200.


http://www.bontrager.com/model/08214

If you have a rack laying around that you aren't using, or want the option of installing a cheaper rack on the road bike, you can get the dropout adapters and brake mount adapters for the above rack separately, part #'s 428715 and 431021 respectively





http://www.bontrager.com/model/08181

There's also seatpost-mounted rack bosses, which will be a little stiffer than the single brake mount point.



http://www.bontrager.com/model/08427

as far as weight is concerned, those seatpost mount racks are usually about 20 lb. max, which means maybe 10 before they start to get wiggly. Above setup has a listed max weight of 50 lbs., and will start to get wiggly around 30, which also happens to be right about where your handling gets mildly messed up from the front / back weight imbalance. Imbalanced loads are not a problem unique to road bikes though; it will happen with anything without a front rack. If you want to use the full 50 pounds more than once every other week I'd say go ahead and look for a trailer.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2014, 01:05:23 PM »
What wheel set are you using that easily handles regular loading of 275 on a washboard road Russ?

FunkyStickman

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2014, 01:05:42 PM »
Either:
1. Trailer, which may not handle well behind a lightweight racing bike, or
2. Get a seatpost-mounted rack, or
3. Use rubber-coated P-clamps on the seatstays, and a seatpost rack adapter from ProblemSolvers.

CanuckExpat

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2014, 01:07:36 PM »
Will p-clamps work for you?

Russ

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2014, 01:15:41 PM »
No p-clamps on carbon guys. compression loads where they aren't expected are a huge no-no.

GuitarStv: Bontrager Aeolus 3 carbon clinchers (preproduction rims, so they are actually not quite as strong as the consumer version) with 32mm R2 tires. I've also loaded up a far less expensive pair of aluminum Race TLR rims similarly and rode them down some railroad tracks without issue.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2014, 01:17:38 PM by Russ »

Russ

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2014, 01:16:35 PM »
1. Trailer, which may not handle well behind a lightweight racing bike, or

trailer handling is pretty well independent of the bike it's behind

TrMama

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2014, 02:11:16 PM »
If you have a rack laying around that you aren't using, or want the option of installing a cheaper rack on the road bike, you can get the dropout adapters and brake mount adapters for the above rack separately, part #'s 428715 and 431021 respectively





http://www.bontrager.com/model/08181

Russ - Thank you. Those little L-brackets are just what I was looking for. Out of curiosity, why are P-clamps so terrible on carbon? I just popped into my local bike shop and the owner swore up and down that all I need are a couple P-clamps (for the lower attachment point) and the brake mount adapter you linked. He sent me home with both, free of charge.

I'm not worried at all about the extra weight on the back wheel or the frame. I'm only 5'4", average weight and have seen much bigger people riding the same kind of set up with no problem. I want to be able to bring extra clothes/shoes/lunch/etc to work and pack a bag of groceries home without crushing delicate bread or lettuce. Right now, I carry everything in a messenger bag and heavier loads are hard on my lower back.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike Rack for Road Bike with No Braze Ons?
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2014, 04:18:51 PM »
GuitarStv: Bontrager Aeolus 3 carbon clinchers (preproduction rims, so they are actually not quite as strong as the consumer version) with 32mm R2 tires. I've also loaded up a far less expensive pair of aluminum Race TLR rims similarly and rode them down some railroad tracks without issue.

At 1400$ a wheel we're well out of my area of expertise.  :P