Author Topic: Residential Rainwater Harvesting  (Read 2362 times)

WSUCoug1994

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Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« on: January 04, 2017, 01:37:10 PM »
I am just in the education phase of investigating rainwater harvesting.  Anyone here doing it?

leroyjenkins

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2017, 02:16:16 PM »
I just googled that, since I've never heard of it before. Is this a thing gaining traction in CA or has it always been around? Sounds interesting.

WSUCoug1994

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2017, 02:43:34 PM »
Seems like Solar 15 years ago - been going on in back yards for years but gaining mainstream attention.  Our City give massive subsidies and pay you by the gallon capacity of the system.  I am on well/septic and I would love the extra capacity in this drought impacted part of the country.  In my county we get quite a bit of rain during the winter.

stashgrower

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2017, 04:26:52 AM »
I've rented at places with rainwater collection systems (tank and informal means). The intention was to use that water for the gardens. I know a couple of people who have rainwater tanks for drinking, but am unaware of the details.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2017, 07:36:22 AM »
Seems like Solar 15 years ago - been going on in back yards for years but gaining mainstream attention.

As long as someone can make a profit and mark-up supplies and installation, they will, it seems.

Fishindude

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2017, 08:34:25 AM »
Good program for gardeners.  Rainwater naturally has some nitrogen in it too which will help your plants.

WSUCoug1994

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2017, 12:09:37 PM »
What is interesting for me is that I already have all of the equipment to purify the water for drinking since I am on a well.  I also have a property with landscaping that we have invested a lot of time/money.  Since I have a fairly large sqft roof this could be a really inexpensive and environmentally friendly way to water my landscaping, wash cars, drink, etc.

Apparently this guy is the boss when it comes to rainwater harvesting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZVcJdcVuO0

Kapiira

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2017, 12:30:05 PM »
I do rainwater harvesting, but only for landscape irrigation.  I have a pretty basic system, but it does the job.  I put up gutters on my carport that drain to an infiltration basin for one of my high water use trees.  I also have a 200 gallon rain barrel that I use to water the plants in my backyard.

Here are some links you might be interested in checking out:
http://www.harvestingrainwater.com/
https://watershedmg.org/learn/resource-library?

sw1tch

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2017, 12:46:42 PM »
I did some research a couple years back on rainwater harvesting and also setting up a grey-water irrigation system.  Another interesting project that I also researched was solar water heating.

I hope to implement some of these concepts someday when we buy another house.

Prairie Stash

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2017, 12:48:24 PM »
Rain barrels are common here for watering gardens. To determine if its worthwhile figure out the square footage of the collection area (roof), and multiply by the rainfall amount to see how much you can collect on a typical rain fall. Then figure out (by checking local weather stats) how often it typically rains and decide if you can empty the system between rains. Use that to determine your max reservoir size.

Typically undersized is a bit more cost effective. Larger systems tend not to fill up as often and you end up paying for empty space that might only get used twice a year vs. the first 200 gallons that gets used every time it rains.

My system is scalable, I use plastic barrels that can be connected if I want to add more on. It also cost under $0.50/gallon (100 gallons), I like it but its payoff is about 10 years, realistically there's not that much money to be saved/made because of my local rainfall patterns. Its just a good environmental project, it helps alleviate the pressure on the storm water system and saves the cost of purifying water for garden use.

Indio

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Re: Residential Rainwater Harvesting
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2017, 03:31:53 PM »
I have a surface fed well that is about 20-30 ft deep. It used to supply house water till the switch over to town water. I use the well as a primary water supply for everything outdoors. On all of the gutters, I have rain barrels that can collect about 500 gals total. I use a solar powered pump to move the water around the garden. The rain water is so much better for plants because it doesn't have chlorine or fluoride in it.
I feel that every new construction should have a mandatory water cistern built in to collect rainwater and use it for flushing toilets, laundry, gardening etc. There are permaculture/gardening sites that talk about how to collect, filter and use the water.