Author Topic: Recommended Books for major life change. ( Career and solo cross country move)  (Read 2880 times)

wealthviahealth

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I am a few short weeks away from moving across the country to begin my new career and essential start "fresh" in a city where I know just about no one.

This is in some ways nerve-wracking but I'm more excited than anything.
Do any books come to mind that may be helpful for such a big change?
Open to any tips/suggestions others have as well who have been in my shoes.

pwegifts

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Quote
Do any books come to mind that may be helpful for such a big change?

I dont have any book recommendations, but can give you some personal experience.  My wife, I, and our three small kids just moved cross country (Midwest to Southeast) late last year pretty much on a whim.  We couldnt stand the midwest weather anymore, and family drama didnt help us wanting to stay.  In less than a month, we went from being in our "normal daily life" to completely moved into a new place cross country.  We knew nobody in the place that we were moving to (which was kind of exciting).

Biggest thing that I suggest is when you get to settled into your new city is to get out and experience it.  Get to know your neighbors.  Network with people.  This was one of the harder parts for my wife and I because we are more on the private side.  But now we have some great friends that we can lean on if we need anything.

Not sure if the city is big or small, but are there any websites or blogs that give you recommendations on what to experience in the city?  Cool places to visit?

Id also suggest to not try to stress which is pretty much a given.  Some things might not go exactly to plan, but for us, that was the point.  It was something new for us to experience, and have a fresh start.

humbleMouse

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Read narcissus and goldmund by herman hesse

SondraRose

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Ask your friends/family if they know anyone in your new town, who would meet you for coffee and give you a "local's" point of view.

We did this with our two recent moves and were easily able to meet folk by hanging out in the right places.

Also check out Meetup.com and Google your hobbies/pursuits in that town to meet like-minded folk.

Citydata.com is also a useful site for info on your new town.

Churches, dog parks and gyms are also good places to meet folk, if you are so inclined...


Rufus.T.Firefly

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Yes!

Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard
By Chip Heath and Dan Heath

I universally recommend this book when anyone wants to see change occur in their lives - personal, career, or in a large organization. Very insightful real world examples that are translated into easy-to-understand, actionable advice.

RunHappy

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I am a few short weeks away from moving across the country to begin my new career and essential start "fresh" in a city where I know just about no one.

This is in some ways nerve-wracking but I'm more excited than anything.
Do any books come to mind that may be helpful for such a big change?
Open to any tips/suggestions others have as well who have been in my shoes.

I recommend blogging/journaling about your experiences and feelings.  Write your own book. Good luck!

Noodle

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How exciting! I have done major moves and job changes several times. Always scary but an adventure too--and so much easier now in the days of smart phones and Google maps than back in the days when you had to go to the gas station and buy one of those big map books to get around.

Specific suggestions: Once you know where you are living (do you have a place yet?) use the internet to locate a grocery store, hardware store, store that sells All the Things (for when you need a toilet plunger at 9 PM), and gas station. If you are going to be using public transportation, spend some time to figure out how the system works; spend some time walking, driving or biking around to get the lay of the land. Try different routes to get places once you have the landmarks down. Angie's List is worth the price to figure out recommendations for doctors, mechanics, etc. (I found word of mouth to be unreliable).

For friendmaking: Aside from meet-up, church or volunteering, in some areas (the South especially) alumni groups can be quite strong. Book groups (the public library usually has some) are good conversation starters. Even if you are shy, make yourself a rule to invite a co-worker for coffee or lunch once a week and ask for suggestions about your new area. Most people love to talk about their favorites. Specific questions (where can I get a great burger?) will get more useful information than general ones. Especially if you are living in multifamily housing, it is worth it to proactively introduce yourself to the neighbors and make nice. Eventually there WILL be a problem you have to cooperate on, and it will go better if you know each other on a friendly basis.

For the times when you are feeling lonely: Scout out ahead of time some of the things you like to do, whether that's bike trails, movie theaters, coffee shops. I always got my library card right away as a place to go with humans. I would also budget a little more in the early days on socializing etc. It's investment in human capital...once you know people better you can suggest budget matinees and free park picnics.

KittyFooFoo

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Pretty loosely related, but:

The Art of Learning by Josh Waitzkin