Author Topic: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified  (Read 6888 times)

AllAboutBalance

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Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« on: May 19, 2016, 11:26:11 AM »
Hi,

First time posting here but have been reading the forums forever.

Decided to post a case study to get people's input on my budget.  But first a little about me:

-35, single female, no kids, no plans to have kids, no pets.  Hold a bachelors; live in the Midwest and gross $7K/month.  No car; long commute to work (not changing any time soon for reasons that would take too long to explain at the moment).  I ride the train. 
-Goals:  I'm trying to balance out my life; at first I felt I could go "all in" and save 50% of my net income and retire in 17 years, but now I'm not too sure about that as travel is very important to me so I make that a pretty high priority.  So is a decent apartment (I live in a high COL area) because I commute and work so much that having a place in a nice, safe neighborhood close to everything I do outside of work is also important.  I just recently moved to a new place that really is probably too high price-wise, but the lease is only 6 months.  IF I don't stay here long term, I 'could' move and pay potentially $950-$1150/month instead.  Since I don't think I'm putting away enough to retire at an ideal age (for me that would be 50), I think I am willing to work for much longer and continue to work part time after I hit age 65.   I am not that great with estimates, forecasting and budgeting!  But I have estimated needing $3000/month when I retire at 65.  My plan to achieve the $3000/month is as follows:

-$500-Company pension (2 years in at this company; would need to hit 10 years total to achieve)
-$500-Part time work during retirement years
-$500-Social security estimate
-$1500-Retirement funds (401K/ROTH-Estimated needing $450K to achieve at 4% withdrawal rate-please correct me if I'm wrong)

Current 401K balance: $30K
Current ROTH balance: Only $1,000
No credit card debt; $14K in student loans at 2.5%
Employer contributes 5% of salary as long as I contribute 5%

I feel like I'm oversimplifying things but I'd still like to get everyone's input on my plan and my current budget.  Here goes!:

Net Income:  4480


Student Loans   225
Travel   500
Emergency Savings Fund   200
401k (10% of gross)   700
Rent   1551
All FOOD related expenses (Grocery and eating out)   300
Household items/toiletries   25
Fun fund (spending cash)   154
ROTH (6% of gross)   450
Utility package   85
Cell phone   60
Gym   30
Electric bill   50
Gifts   50
Transportation (monthly train card)   100
Total   4480
Remaining   0

mxt0133

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2016, 11:56:38 AM »
At your income level I would put all retirement savings towards your 401k vs the Roth.

You are also spend a lot on rent, can you get a two bedroom and get a roommate or buy a house and get a few roommates?

Since you like to travel I would looking into travel hacking to lower your travel expenses.  Even with a few credit card signup bonuses you could pay for 1-2 flights and a few nights at hotels a year.  You don't have to go full boar since its only you.  I just booked 4 tickets to Hawaii and 5 hotel nights and paid about $400 and reward points instead of ~$3500 that was just about 1/3 of the rewards we earned from last year.

There are many things that you can optimize without depriving yourself and help you get to FI even if you never want to stop working.  FI will give you so much more options and if you do change your mind about working past 50 better you don't have to if you don't want to.

slappy

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2016, 12:14:09 PM »
The social security estimate seems a bit low. I'm 31 and my estimate is around $2k.

Also, there's a huge difference between the price of the apartment you have now and what you say you could get when your lease is up in six months. Would the cheaper apartment be comparable? I know you value the home environment, so I wouldn't suggest going to the cheapest place possible, but $400-$500 a month is a good amount of money.

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2016, 12:19:27 PM »
At your income level I would put all retirement savings towards your 401k vs the Roth.

You are also spend a lot on rent, can you get a two bedroom and get a roommate or buy a house and get a few roommates?

Since you like to travel I would looking into travel hacking to lower your travel expenses.  Even with a few credit card signup bonuses you could pay for 1-2 flights and a few nights at hotels a year.  You don't have to go full boar since its only you.  I just booked 4 tickets to Hawaii and 5 hotel nights and paid about $400 and reward points instead of ~$3500 that was just about 1/3 of the rewards we earned from last year.

There are many things that you can optimize without depriving yourself and help you get to FI even if you never want to stop working.  FI will give you so much more options and if you do change your mind about working past 50 better you don't have to if you don't want to.

What is the reasoning behind putting everything into the 401K?  I thought the general rule was to actually put in the 401k up to the employer match, then max ROTH, then go back to maxing 401K?

I am a newbie to credit card churning; I just got my first card and bonus but your deals sounds unbelievable.  I will continue to learn more about this to save on travel costs but I do believe banks will start putting forth new policies soon restricting bonus offers.  In the meantime I will do as much as I can as cheap as I can but I'm aiming for 2 international trips/year and I live away from my friends/family so I usually go home twice a year (and for instance, I have to go home in August for a friend's wedding).  I say 'have' to because I decline mannny many invites but I'm trying not to decline 'all' of them as I only see my family/friends on the holidays nowadays.

slappy

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2016, 12:22:48 PM »
For the 401k vs Roth, as a single person with your income, you are likely in a much higher tax bracket than you will be in retirement. So the tax savings from a 401k will benefit you more now than the tax free Roth distributions later.

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2016, 12:24:52 PM »
The social security estimate seems a bit low. I'm 31 and my estimate is around $2k.

Also, there's a huge difference between the price of the apartment you have now and what you say you could get when your lease is up in six months. Would the cheaper apartment be comparable? I know you value the home environment, so I wouldn't suggest going to the cheapest place possible, but $400-$500 a month is a good amount of money.

Regarding the SS estimate, I am trying to be on the safe side and I think there is a high enough probability I will get 'at least' that much.  Will I probably get more than that?  Yes, but for estimation purposes I prefer to be extremely conservative there.

RE: the apartment, it depends on what you mean by comparable.  Commute would be a little shorter (which is a big deal because my commute is verrrry long).  I could probably get one that looks about the same as what I have now; it will just be in a different location (a side of town I lived in before that I did not like living in, but of course I could consider going back for financial purposes).  It will not have any of the amenities but my current amenities are pretty insane anyways.  It may also end up being in spot that's not as easy to get to all of the places I typically go on a frequent basis. 
« Last Edit: May 19, 2016, 12:30:02 PM by AllAboutBalance »

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2016, 12:25:26 PM »
For the 401k vs Roth, as a single person with your income, you are likely in a much higher tax bracket than you will be in retirement. So the tax savings from a 401k will benefit you more now than the tax free Roth distributions later.

Gotcha...makes sense.

undercover

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2016, 12:29:44 PM »
Being in the midwest, you can probably find a good deal on a house and if you put in the work now, you'll continue to reap the benefits later. Yes you may have to give up on having the "perfect" location and lifestyle for you, but you'll be building equity, making money potentially, and probably end up being able to take "mini-retirements" sooner than later. With little investments so far, I think buying could make a lot of sense.

The only reason I would advise against a house is if it prevents you from being able to move for a better job, hence if you buy reasonably and run the numbers if you were to hand it over to a property management company down the line - you could still be mobile.

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2016, 12:45:48 PM »
Being in the midwest, you can probably find a good deal on a house and if you put in the work now, you'll continue to reap the benefits later. Yes you may have to give up on having the "perfect" location and lifestyle for you, but you'll be building equity, making money potentially, and probably end up being able to take "mini-retirements" sooner than later. With little investments so far, I think buying could make a lot of sense.

The only reason I would advise against a house is if it prevents you from being able to move for a better job, hence if you buy reasonably and run the numbers if you were to hand it over to a property management company down the line - you could still be mobile.

I would love to buy...I would need the 20% down or $30-$40K which, if I sacrificed my travel and ROTH and saved $1K a month, would put me at about a little over 3 years to accomplish.  I am not really open to a house being a single person that likes to live in the city/close to it; a condo would be more practical for me; especially considering maintenance/yardwork/etc.

formerlydivorcedmom

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2016, 01:07:28 PM »
You're planning to make $500/month in perpetuity once you retire?  I would be wary of this assumption.  At some point, your health may not allow that.  At some point, you may have a hard time finding work.

How will that impact your standard of living?

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2016, 01:18:37 PM »
You're planning to make $500/month in perpetuity once you retire?  I would be wary of this assumption.  At some point, your health may not allow that.  At some point, you may have a hard time finding work.

How will that impact your standard of living?

Yeah, I guess including that in the estimates (forever) isn't smart.  I will have to think about where to get the other $500 from.  I am not sure how to revise my plans to account for this.

andy85

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2016, 01:35:14 PM »
I mean i think it is easily doable.

Let's just guess that you will get $1500/month from your SS and pension at 65
I mean, if you only invest like $8000/year from now until you're 65 with a 4% return, then that is around $500k, which will kick off $20k/year at a 4% SWR.

If you really do plan on going until you're 65, maybe invest as much as possible for the next few years (time value of money and all) then taper off a bit. Gives your money more time to grow and who knows, maybe it will motivate you to keep up the high savings rate.

jwright

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2016, 01:44:43 PM »
Isn't the 401K already deducted to arrive at your net income?  It seems like you should have an additional $700/month.

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2016, 01:46:43 PM »
I mean i think it is easily doable.

Let's just guess that you will get $1500/month from your SS and pension at 65
I mean, if you only invest like $8000/year from now until you're 65 with a 4% return, then that is around $500k, which will kick off $20k/year at a 4% SWR.

If you really do plan on going until you're 65, maybe invest as much as possible for the next few years (time value of money and all) then taper off a bit. Gives your money more time to grow and who knows, maybe it will motivate you to keep up the high savings rate.

I agree.

In re-reading my post and looking at the numbers, the things that stand out the most to me that I can do to improve my chances of having a decent retirement are:

-Getting rent cost down to put towards additional contributions in 401K
-Purchasing a home (by maybe 40?) to pay off by 55
-Maybe decent travel budget by a little to also contribute more to 401K

I do realize I need to put in more now...I estimate I need to make that 450K or very close to it by 55 actually.  I don't expect I would be able to keep my current position and work at the rate I am past that age.  I mean, I could, but I think to assume that would not be wise.  I am expecting the % I contribute to 401K to drop off around that age.

andy85

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2016, 01:54:36 PM »
I mean i think it is easily doable.

Let's just guess that you will get $1500/month from your SS and pension at 65
I mean, if you only invest like $8000/year from now until you're 65 with a 4% return, then that is around $500k, which will kick off $20k/year at a 4% SWR.

If you really do plan on going until you're 65, maybe invest as much as possible for the next few years (time value of money and all) then taper off a bit. Gives your money more time to grow and who knows, maybe it will motivate you to keep up the high savings rate.

I agree.

In re-reading my post and looking at the numbers, the things that stand out the most to me that I can do to improve my chances of having a decent retirement are:

-Getting rent cost down to put towards additional contributions in 401K
-Purchasing a home (by maybe 40?) to pay off by 55
-Maybe decent travel budget by a little to also contribute more to 401K

I do realize I need to put in more now...I estimate I need to make that 450K or very close to it by 55 actually[/u].  I don't expect I would be able to keep my current position and work at the rate I am past that age.  I mean, I could, but I think to assume that would not be wise.  I am expecting the % I contribute to 401K to drop off around that age.
Hell...even with a 4% return from now until you're 55, that is only about $13k/year in contributions...so $400 more dollars than you are contributing now per month (turn that 700 into 1100/month and you're good to go).

boarder42

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2016, 02:14:24 PM »
you should be travel hacking with CC's ... take the travelmiles 101 course ... thank them later thats another 6k per year you just found. 

redbird

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2016, 02:29:57 PM »
Honestly, I think you're doing pretty well. I agree with others in that you should see if you can optimize your travel with credit cards that give you miles and other rewards. If you're spending approximately $500/month on travel, that's a big investment in it, so you should try to save with rewards where you can.

If you want to reduce your monthly budget, the main things I can see that might be worth changing is:

- Rent: You do mention you live in a HCOL area though. So it's not necessarily unreasonable. I've actually spent more than that for rent ($2k+/mo), but the times I did I was living in Hawaii and Tokyo. If it's possible to cut this down though, I would.
- Food: This looks high to me. My family of 2 adults and no children (well, and a bird - but a $30 bag of food lasts her 6 months) spends approximately $200/month to eat in Atlanta. But we don't eat out except for super rare treats. I am aware that food costs can vary drastically depending on area and I imagine if you're single you may want to eat out more than we do. But you could probably cut this down if you eat out a bit less.

horsepoor

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2016, 04:01:37 PM »
I think you're on a better track than you believe, unless I'm missing something.

Starting with 30K, earning 84K gross and contributing 21% pre-tax (your current 10% + 6% + 5% employer contribution) and plugging in an annual growth rate of 7% over the next 20 years, I get a future value of $889,000. 

mozar

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2016, 04:39:30 PM »
I second that you shouldn't count on income in retirement. On average women have a harder time finding jobs after 50. The company my mom was working at disbanded when she was 50. She hasn't been able to find a job since. It's been 8 years.

galliver

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2016, 05:44:16 PM »
You have plenty of people helping you with predictions (which I'm also not very good at), and I can't in good conscience pick on your food spending or other bills. But I have two questions:

1) What defines a "decent" apartment? You said location is important, but what about the location? Are you certain other areas of the city don't fit most of your requirements, and offer lower rent for not fitting others? Now on to the apartment: size, style, and amenities determine rent (as well as location of course). Can you find and make do with a smaller apartment (fewer BR or SF)? Or one with slightly inferior style (laminate instead of hardwood, etc)? Or simpler or absent appliances that present minor inconveniences (no dishwasher? in-building vs in-unit laundry?) And of course, probably lacking some in-demand amenities (pool? gym? "clubhouse"? roof deck? but how much is access to these things costing you, whether or not you use it?)

I realize this might be hard to find in a swanky area with high demand for luxury apartments. Which is another reason I think it's worth considering if other locations will fit the bill. By the way, if you'd said you were in SF or NYC, I'd probably not question the rent (it's probably a closet sized studio in those places?) but I am not familiar with any midwestern cities that don't have more affordable options...

2) What's your standard of travel? and perhaps more importantly, what's the GOAL of your travel? Because you can travel a lot of ways, from guided tour packages and luxury hotels and resorts to backpacking, hostels, Couchsurfing, and WWOOF. Bf and I have gotten involved in Couchsurfing since moving in together, and have made friends from/in Denmark and Moscow, who have both offered to reciprocate should we ever come out their way. It can be nerve-wracking at first, but I usually lose my jitters within minutes of meeting any surfers we accept in person (the creepers have so far been pretty easy to weed out online). You can also offer to just meet up with people passing through town; sometimes people just want a new friend to show them around. Anyway, just suggesting it as a possible way to both save money AND connect more to your destinations :)

Gimesalot

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2016, 06:10:09 PM »
About your traveling...  I understand that it is a priority, but you spend the same as husband and I do with several trips every year including at least one or two international trips.  Could you cut down your spending by focusing on lower cost destinations for the next couple of years?  For example, if my math is correct, cutting $2500 for 3 years could result in an additional $50k when you are 65.


AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2016, 09:46:58 AM »
I mean i think it is easily doable.

Let's just guess that you will get $1500/month from your SS and pension at 65
I mean, if you only invest like $8000/year from now until you're 65 with a 4% return, then that is around $500k, which will kick off $20k/year at a 4% SWR.

If you really do plan on going until you're 65, maybe invest as much as possible for the next few years (time value of money and all) then taper off a bit. Gives your money more time to grow and who knows, maybe it will motivate you to keep up the high savings rate.

I agree.

In re-reading my post and looking at the numbers, the things that stand out the most to me that I can do to improve my chances of having a decent retirement are:

-Getting rent cost down to put towards additional contributions in 401K
-Purchasing a home (by maybe 40?) to pay off by 55
-Maybe decent travel budget by a little to also contribute more to 401K

I do realize I need to put in more now...I estimate I need to make that 450K or very close to it by 55 actually[/u].  I don't expect I would be able to keep my current position and work at the rate I am past that age.  I mean, I could, but I think to assume that would not be wise.  I am expecting the % I contribute to 401K to drop off around that age.
Hell...even with a 4% return from now until you're 55, that is only about $13k/year in contributions...so $400 more dollars than you are contributing now per month (turn that 700 into 1100/month and you're good to go).

Makes sense...I don't think it would be hard for me to find the extra $400/month...

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2016, 09:49:52 AM »
Honestly, I think you're doing pretty well. I agree with others in that you should see if you can optimize your travel with credit cards that give you miles and other rewards. If you're spending approximately $500/month on travel, that's a big investment in it, so you should try to save with rewards where you can.

If you want to reduce your monthly budget, the main things I can see that might be worth changing is:

- Rent: You do mention you live in a HCOL area though. So it's not necessarily unreasonable. I've actually spent more than that for rent ($2k+/mo), but the times I did I was living in Hawaii and Tokyo. If it's possible to cut this down though, I would.
- Food: This looks high to me. My family of 2 adults and no children (well, and a bird - but a $30 bag of food lasts her 6 months) spends approximately $200/month to eat in Atlanta. But we don't eat out except for super rare treats. I am aware that food costs can vary drastically depending on area and I imagine if you're single you may want to eat out more than we do. But you could probably cut this down if you eat out a bit less.

Yeah...Hawaii and Tokyo are extremely expensive.  I know my rent is high but I just moved into a new place after having to legally break a lease at my old place (long story...major issues that could have impacted my safety).  I moved out on short notice and picked a place I had lived in a few years back because I was familiar with it really and knew I would have piece of mind living there.  But the lease is only 6 months.  I'd actually prefer to stay but I will continue to look for other options. 

The $300 for food is groceries plus eating out.

mamagoose

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2016, 10:04:48 AM »
If your current amenities at your apartment are "insane", then why are you spending $30/month on a gym membership? Don't most apartments have an on-site fitness center? And $60/month for a cell phone is unusually high around these parts - check out Republic - mine is about $13/month.

LawMMMan

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #24 on: May 20, 2016, 10:31:43 AM »
Load up on the 401k.  You'll thank yourself in the future.

-LawMMMan

AllAboutBalance

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2016, 10:43:45 AM »
If your current amenities at your apartment are "insane", then why are you spending $30/month on a gym membership? Don't most apartments have an on-site fitness center? And $60/month for a cell phone is unusually high around these parts - check out Republic - mine is about $13/month.

Regarding the gym membership, I've had it for over 8 years and I'm just scared if I cancel it I'll move again and not be able to get this kind of deal.  It's at an LA Fitness and I've always lived near one despite how many times I've moved or to where I've moved.  I still use the gym (usually 5 days a week but the past month has only been 3 days a week due to the recent move).  But the reason is for access to a large variety of actual weight machines because the gym in my current building isn't huge and just has a few light free weights.  I've moved 9 times in the past 15 years so I feel like if I do move again this or next year and it's to another place without a gym I'll regret giving up the $30/month membership.  I guess I need to just let it go..??

I will check into a better plan but I haven't heard the best things about Republic...


neo von retorch

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #26 on: May 20, 2016, 10:48:30 AM »
I think Republic is (was?) awful as of about two years ago when I tried it. Plus you have to buy a phone from them and sell the phone (and buy another) to switch away from them. Cricket is just AT&T but cheaper, so it's not recommended around here because it has the potential to eliminate inexpensive MVNO alternatives and then jack the prices back up. Google Fi is a shinier version of Republic, which also requires you to buy one of the fancy Google Nexus phones. But there are lots of MVNO options, depending on if you have good AT&T, T-Mobile, or other coverage in your area.

frugaldrummer

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2016, 02:01:14 PM »
Something seems off to me in your math.  You're making $7k a month but only netting 4480 after taxes?  Something is wrong with this picture.  That would mean you're paying about $30k a year in taxes on an 84k salary?  That seems extraordinarily high.  Are you self-employed?  Are you accounting for the tax breaks you get for your 401k contributions?  Have you checked with your accountant on ways to decrease your taxes? 

Are you mistakenly subtracting your 401k contribution from your take home income, when it is already taken out of your check before you get that $4480?

In addition to checking your math and taxes, some other things to consider:

 - increased income.  Do you plan to stay at this level forever, or are there advancement opportunities in your job? Putting away the money from raises can have a big impact in a few years.  Adding a side gig and putting that money away could be a strategy too.

 - housing - are you sure you can't live with anyone else?  I know some people cannot deal with roommates, but man, it's sure a great way to reduce your costs.  Perhaps even better if you buy a 2 bedroom condo, have a roommate to pay a share of the mortgage for you, and then use the equity in your home eventually to buy a place in a cheaper retirement area.  Do the math including property taxes and tax deductions to see if this is reasonable in your area.  Also there are rent-or-buy calculators out there.  Check out duplexes also - you could live in half and rent the other half out, or a house with a granny flat or basement apartment - you could live in the apartment and rent out the house.

What I hear you saying mostly is that you feel discouraged and therefore why should you bother?  Yet you make a good income and as a single person without kids have many expenses that you can avoid.  You totally could save enough to retire early, many people here have done it on less.

 - travel - can almost always be done cheaper. 

 - since you like to travel - consider retiring abroad?  Can be much cheaper.

 - working in retirement - I'll repeat what others have said, don't count on it.  IF you are healthy when you reach retirement age, yes, it's a great way to augment your retirement.  But there's no guarantee you will be - statistics show many people who collect their Social Security early at 62 do so because of health reasons. Plus, you might find you really don't want to work at that age.  Certainly even if you do, it's unlikely you would do that until you die.  Working after retirement should be a potential bonus, not something you depend on.

 - Your social security estimate seems way too low, even if you did retire at 50.  Try running that again. 

Cassie

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2016, 03:10:01 PM »
I have read that many people are not able to find work in retirement. WE are lucky that we can consult in our fields p.t. but that is often not the case.  As others have mentioned many of the people that collect SS at 62 do it due to health problems.  Your Ss will be much bigger then your estimate.

rafiki

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Re: Reader Case Study: 35 and Oversimplified
« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2016, 07:28:42 PM »
As others are saying you are doing well, but I would perhaps suggest the following:

1. Your taxes seem very high relative to your income.
2. What about a side hustle of some sort? That would certainly help things on the income side.
3. Max out your 401K for the benefits of the additional tax deduction before contributing to a Roth IRA.
4. You may be able to shave a little here or there on your budget but it generally looks reasonable. Your biggest expense is your housing, and $1,500 seems expensive. Perhaps there is a way to reduce that. If you can get away with stuff like a cheaper cell phone that certainly would not hurt.
5. I would agree regarding the credit cards for travel points. This is something I am exploring myself.