Author Topic: Questions about visiting Canada  (Read 10281 times)

forummm

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Questions about visiting Canada
« on: May 24, 2015, 09:28:38 AM »
US travelers heading up north (Calgary/Banff) for a bit next month. Maybe some of the Canadians on the forum have some helpful tips.

How common is it to be able to purchase things with USD cash? Or is there a good place to exchange currency? Or should I just get a bunch from an ATM?

Do taxis going to/from major airports take credit cards?

Are Visa credit cards with only magnetic strips (no chip and pin) widely accepted?

Any other advice about things to do in the area? We'll be gone before the Stampede.

frugaliknowit

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2015, 09:36:37 AM »
I flew to Calgary, then stayed in Banff last February. 

While I did get $C20 out of an ATM, I never needed it and ended up using it against my hotel bill.  I used my Capital One Quicksilver for everything.  Most vendors have a wireless device that swipes both magnetic and chip cards.

While I would keep an ATM card available, you should be able to use a credit card (make sure it's one that doesn't charge a foreign exchange fee) for most, if not everything (Not sure about taxis.  We took the "Banff Airporter" bus from Calgary to Banff, then took shuttles to Sunshine Village and Lake Louise ski areas).  I wouldn't use USD as that would work against you and I certainly wouldn't withdraw a bunch of Looney$'s.

Banff Taxi's website says they do take cc's:  http://www.banfftransportation.com/banff-taxi-service.html
« Last Edit: May 24, 2015, 09:46:45 AM by frugaliknowit »

Al1961

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2015, 09:40:54 AM »
US travelers heading up north (Calgary/Banff) for a bit next month. Maybe some of the Canadians on the forum have some helpful tips.

How common is it to be able to purchase things with USD cash? Or is there a good place to exchange currency? Or should I just get a bunch from an ATM?

Do taxis going to/from major airports take credit cards?

Are Visa credit cards with only magnetic strips (no chip and pin) widely accepted?

Any other advice about things to do in the area? We'll be gone before the Stampede.

Some places take $USD. Be prepared to be hosed on the exchange rate, though.

Just use the bank machine

All cabs I've ever used take credit cards

Magnetic strip cards work. When are your banks going to enter the current century and move to chip and PIN?

As I've only ever driven through it on the way to somewhere else, I'm not sure what to do in Calgary except get stuck in traffic. Maybe a local will chime in. Canmore/Banff are worth a few days sightseeing.

Al

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2015, 10:30:59 AM »
Magnetic strip cards work. When are your banks going to enter the current century and move to chip and PIN?

The US banks have decided that it's cheaper to just pay for the fraudulent purchases than to have something more secure. They'll only upgrade when the government forces them to. I think that will happen in the next year or two.

tardis

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2015, 01:22:57 PM »
If you're looking for an in town visit, stick to Banff, but if you're interested in getting away from the crowds of tourists and doing hiking, check out Jasper.  A few hours further, but a lot less visited.

JLee

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2015, 01:35:12 PM »
My girlfriend is in Calgary and I go there a lot. I've never bothered to get cash - just get a credit card that has no foreign transaction fees.

I'm actually flying up Friday for the summer. Maybe we'll run into each other. :P

choppingwood

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2015, 02:05:42 PM »
Any other advice about things to do in the area? We'll be gone before the Stampede.

As I've only ever driven through it on the way to somewhere else, I'm not sure what to do in Calgary except get stuck in traffic.

There is a great zoo, and the Glenbow Museum is well worth a visit if you are into history and art.  The site of the Calgary Olympics is west of the city. I don't know how well it is set up for visitors, but the ski jump architecture and all is quite amazing as you drive by on the way to Banff. It is still used for training and competitions.

RichMoose

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2015, 11:01:10 AM »
Use a Visa or MC (not Amex) with no foreign transaction fees. This will be good for just about everything and exchange costs on your bill will be reasonable. I would get some Canadian cash from a bank ATM for purchase of smaller items and touristy things just because businesses tend to charge big spreads on money exchange when paying in USD.

Some cool things to do are biking in Kananaskis County (foothills area before the Rockies); hiking around Banff, Lake Louise, and Golden; golfing, although the best courses in Banff are impressively pricey; and going to Drumheller if dinosaurs/paleontology are your thing.

If you're planning on hiking, try a scramble. It's essentially a hike where the top portion is up a loose, cracked shale face. Makes for a fantastic workout.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2015, 11:18:13 AM by Tuxedo »

TrMama

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2015, 11:15:40 AM »
US travelers heading up north (Calgary/Banff) for a bit next month. Maybe some of the Canadians on the forum have some helpful tips.

How common is it to be able to purchase things with USD cash? Or is there a good place to exchange currency? Or should I just get a bunch from an ATM?

Do taxis going to/from major airports take credit cards?

Are Visa credit cards with only magnetic strips (no chip and pin) widely accepted?

Any other advice about things to do in the area? We'll be gone before the Stampede.

All forms of Visa and Mastercard are accepted just about everywhere. PIN cards aren't required, you'll just have to sign the receipt like in the olden days.

If you want to pay with US cash, that shouldn't be a problem, but you won't get a good exchange rate. I'd stick to credit cards as much as possible. In fact, I can't think of anywhere that requires cash or debit anymore. I only use it for buying things off Craigslist and paying my kids their allowance.

Don't bother bringing an Amex card. Almost no where up here takes them.

jodelino

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2015, 11:28:27 AM »
I travel to Canada a lot and always get good rates from my US bank when withdrawing Canadian money from an ATM and good rates on my Chase Explorer Miles Mastercard.

If you have leftover loonies at the airport, you can spend them at the duty-free shop buying booze to take home, and top off whatever you need to with your credit card, so you aren't taking any loonies home (I take my loonies home because I know I'm going back).

GuitarStv

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2015, 11:39:03 AM »
Weird.  Booze is so much cheaper in the US than here in Canada . . . do Americans buy much in the duty free stores?

Jouer

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2015, 11:39:21 AM »
Like jodelino said, take some Canadian money out from your local bank. Then use your credit card just as you do in the States.

Don't bother bringing American cash.

jodelino

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2015, 11:40:39 AM »
There is a Nova Scotian maple wine that I adore & I've never seen it in the US.


mensa

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2015, 02:39:00 PM »
Three words about Alberta:

Gopher Hole Museum

Seriously.

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/places/gopher.htm

(Post not meant to make any members of PETA go postal, nor solicit clients from any other stuffed vermin museum)


Al1961

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2015, 05:05:46 PM »
Three words about Alberta:

Gopher Hole Museum

Seriously.

http://www.roadtripamerica.com/places/gopher.htm

(Post not meant to make any members of PETA go postal, nor solicit clients from any other stuffed vermin museum)

Right up there with the alien museum in Roswell. (yes, I went there.)

SandyBoxx

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2015, 08:20:10 PM »
How much time will you be spending in the area?  How much walking/hiking are you interested in?

If you have the time, I would encourage you to consider renting a vehicle and doing a loop from Calgary to at least Lake Louise, and if you have a few extra days, extend your journey all the way to Field and Golden (Golden is about 2 1/2 hours from Calgary, just for reference.)

Banff is beautiful, but is known as a giant outdoor shopping mall, where bus tours drop off hoards of people to shop/gawk, then load them up and carry on.  Definitely stop in and check out the beauty, but if you want to really experience the Rockies, I would suggest carrying on to the Lake Louise area and doing some of the amazing walks/hikes (especially one of the Teahouses - Plain of 6 Glaciers is my favorite.)

From there, plan on a night or two in Field, BC - a tiny little town just across the BC border.  Most of the accommodation options are in Heritage homes, and you will be less than a 15 minute drive to Emerald Lake (DON'T miss this) and Takkakaw Falls.  There is also an amazing restaurant there called the Truffle Pigs Bistro.

If you carry on 45 minutes further down the road to Golden, you will have plenty of options for activities:  Skydive or tandem paraglide off Mount 7, float down the Columbia with wetlands adventures, whitewater rafting, check out the wolves at the Northern Lights wolf center, or simply enjoy the farmer's markets, galleries, and live music in the square.  Irrespective of all the activities, driving Highway 1 from Calgary to Golden is scenic all on its own!

If you have specific questions, feel free to PM me (as I am beginning to sound like a giant advertisement.)

In response to your money question - credit cards are widely accepted, they will gladly take your US cash but hose you on the exchange, and it never hurts to keep some cash in your pocket for fresh fruit at a roadside stand, or some jewellery or fresh baking from a local artisan (though many will run your card on their smartphones now!) :)


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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2015, 02:01:25 PM »
You can get chip cards in the US, though they are chip + sig. They will work in Canadian chip readers but of course you'll still have to sign. Quicksilver is one that you can get a chip version of, zero forex etc.

Discover works in at least two places - Walmart and Esso. That's about it!

Amex is *fairly* widely accepted but there are places it is not. Anything owned by Loblaws (hmm except Shopper's Drug Mart, but that was a recent takeover). AFAIK all gas stations take Amex. You have to do the numbers to see if it's worth using a card with forex fee and good rewards vs no forex and lower cashback. Note Amex Blue Cash is x% in US supermarkets/gas stations - it'd be interesting to know if you got the bonus % up here, but I suspect not.

I basically don't carry cash. There are a very very very few places that don't take credit. There are occasional places that don't take Visa, or don't take Mastercard. Some "No Frills" take MC but not Visa (or Amex), for example. Dollarama takes debit or cash only.

That's all I've got.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2015, 02:09:41 PM »
Thanks everyone. This should be pretty simple. We'll definitely get to the less touristy spots of Banff. There are so many nice hikes to choose from. We probably won't make it all the way to Jasper. I'm interested in seeing the Olympic venues too.

yyc-phil

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2015, 02:22:32 PM »
US travelers heading up north (Calgary/Banff) for a bit next month. Maybe some of the Canadians on the forum have some helpful tips.

How common is it to be able to purchase things with USD cash? Or is there a good place to exchange currency? Or should I just get a bunch from an ATM?

Do taxis going to/from major airports take credit cards?

Are Visa credit cards with only magnetic strips (no chip and pin) widely accepted?

Any other advice about things to do in the area? We'll be gone before the Stampede.

Most if not all taxis take credit cards. From the airport to downtown, the cost is about $40 but you can take a shuttle from the airport (in front of the US arrival level when you exit the secured area) which will take you to major downtown hotels for $15. If there are more than two travelers in your group, taxi is cheaper.

Most credit cards machine accept cards with chip/pin or magnetic strip.

I would recommend to pay with credit card, or use the ATM. Most places that do accept US $ will not give you a good rate.

Nices places to hike, aside from the obvious like Banff: Canmore 45 mn away west of Calgary on Hwy1, Yamnuska Mountain (about 35 mn west of Calgary on Hwy 1A; the hike is 3-4 hour easy/moderate hike with a difficult 30 mn scramble to the summit if you wish), small Alberta towns like Black Diamond and Old Okotoks about 30 mn south of Calgary, Cochrane (on the way to Yamnuska which is only a few km west of Cochrane). A bit further south, Waterton/Glacier National Parks are worth the visit but it would involve an overnight if you really want to enjoy the mountains.


Cookie78

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2015, 02:51:16 PM »
Most if not all taxis take credit cards. From the airport to downtown, the cost is about $40 but you can take a shuttle from the airport (in front of the US arrival level when you exit the secured area) which will take you to major downtown hotels for $15. If there are more than two travelers in your group, taxi is cheaper.

If you want to get really mustacian you can take the regular transit bus too. $3.15 each. The route 100 bus will drop you off at McKnight station and you can take the train downtown from there (don't forget to get a transfer slip from the bus driver). You can buy tickets on the bus with exact change if you have it (you won't), or buy them from the Mac's convenience store at the north end of the terminal (turn left when you exit the secure area).

The route 300 BRT bus will take you directly downtown with less hassle for $9.50 each. Same rules about exact change, or paying at the Mac's store in the airport apply. (I've never personally taken this bus. Just got the info from www.calgarytransit.com)


Blonde Lawyer

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #20 on: May 26, 2015, 03:01:26 PM »
I was recently in Montreal and it was chip cards only there at a lot of places.  We had a hard time finding an ATM we could use.  We now have Chase Sapphire with a chip and no foreign transaction fees

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2015, 03:22:28 PM »
We're renting a car and will be going to Glacier too. I prioritized Glacier so that I could visit before all the glaciers melt. Some estimates (may be too pessimistic) have them going by 2020.

scottish

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2015, 03:29:54 PM »
There used to be some nice glaciers up by the icefields parkway.   On the way to Glacier National park, just detour north about 1 hour.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2015, 03:54:46 PM »
There used to be some nice glaciers up by the icefields parkway.   On the way to Glacier National park, just detour north about 1 hour.

I'll have to do that. Thanks!

Meggslynn

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2015, 02:53:09 PM »
Definitely go to Moraine Lake. Its about a 45 minute drive from Banff (on the way to Lake Louise) but it is the most breath taking spot I have ever been. Rent a canoe to go on the lake.

St. James Gate is Irish pub in Banff that has delightful food.


Sorry I don't have much for recommendations for Calgary except maybe Heritage Park?

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2015, 04:28:45 PM »
So far we've hiked all around the Olympic Park venues, which was cool. The ski jump landing area is sloped really steeply. So it's less "ski jump" and more "try to fall less quickly than the ground below you is already falling". We've done a bunch of Banff hikes, including Tunnel Mountain (which does not have a tunnel). We did a 7.5 mile one today in the rain along a pretty rapid-moving river with multiple water falls. Some crazy dudes were planning to kayak the river. They were still carrying their gear up the river when we passed by, so we didn't actually get to see them die.

Visa has been accepted everywhere, so that's been very convenient. I haven't had to take out any cash yet. Traveling in developed nations is much easier.

choppingwood

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2015, 08:06:29 PM »
So far we've hiked all around the Olympic Park venues, which was cool. The ski jump landing area is sloped really steeply. So it's less "ski jump" and more "try to fall less quickly than the ground below you is already falling". We've done a bunch of Banff hikes, including Tunnel Mountain (which does not have a tunnel). We did a 7.5 mile one today in the rain along a pretty rapid-moving river with multiple water falls. Some crazy dudes were planning to kayak the river. They were still carrying their gear up the river when we passed by, so we didn't actually get to see them die.

Welcome to Canada! Interesting about Olympic Park - I've got to stop next time, instead of driving by....

They planned to build a tunnel but it was going to take a year and a half longer to build the railway. No way were they going to waste the name, though.

There are always crazy kayakers. (Not the same thing at all as "all kayakers are crazy".) On a trip to Haida Gw'aai in a Zodiac, we ran into a couple who had been rescued from stormy seas. She was saying to him, "Well, I wasn't the one who spent the night calling for my mommy...." You had to think the relationship was on its last legs.

Spondulix

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2015, 08:48:34 PM »
I was in Banff last winter. I took out a little cash before I went (local exchange company) and the rate was better than if I had taken from the ATM (or ABM as they call it :) Don't just assume because you have a VISA or AMEX that you won't get fees. Call your credit card company and ask about charges/fees for transactions in Canada.

I loved the upper Hot Springs in Banff. Check the schedule at the Banff Centre cause they may have concerts and events starting already for the summer. Also, I kept my cell service off and got by on Wifi. On iPhone, Facebook messenger was actually the best way to communicate (with the people I was traveling with, like when we split up). iMessage was really inconsistent.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2015, 08:59:35 PM »
My credit card doesn't charge fees. The exchange rates are pretty good. We have Republic Wireless phones, so our calls are free over WiFi, even for international calls, which is really nice.

The Olympic Park has a separate concrete "luge" track for riding down on wheels that people were doing. And a mountain bike course. But mostly it was just fun to see where all the action was 27 years ago. We walked the length of the bobsled (they call it bobsleigh) track, right next to it. Standing there for a race must be a lot of standing and then a quick blur. We also saw the genuine imitation Jamaican bobsled from Cool Runnings. There's a Canada sports museum there too which we did not see.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2015, 08:43:10 AM »
Yesterday we walked around Lake Louise and quickly checked out Lake Moraine. It was pretty cloudy all day so we couldn't see much of the top of the mountains. Hopefully things will be clearer today for long enough to get a view. We were a couple miles along the Louise trail, all the way past the end of the lake and into some of the upstream areas when it started to rain pretty hard. I have a jacket but we were pretty wet by the time we got back to the car. The hand dryers make great pants dryers too.

We drove out to the icefields and saw a bunch of glaciers. The wind created by the Athabascan was really intense. And we saw a bunch of rams and some elk and a couple bears. Busy day. I bought 1 gallon of gas for $6 ($1.50/liter) in the middle of nowhere. I think that's the most I've ever paid. The guy was irked that I only wanted 4 liters.

Meggslynn

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2015, 08:49:33 AM »
I hope the weather improves for you. I am about 3 hours from where you are and we have had great weather. The weather in the mountains always seems to be more temperamental.

Hope you are enjoying yourself :)

RichMoose

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2015, 09:51:46 AM »
Yesterday we walked around Lake Louise and quickly checked out Lake Moraine. It was pretty cloudy all day so we couldn't see much of the top of the mountains. Hopefully things will be clearer today for long enough to get a view. We were a couple miles along the Louise trail, all the way past the end of the lake and into some of the upstream areas when it started to rain pretty hard. I have a jacket but we were pretty wet by the time we got back to the car. The hand dryers make great pants dryers too.

We drove out to the icefields and saw a bunch of glaciers. The wind created by the Athabascan was really intense. And we saw a bunch of rams and some elk and a couple bears. Busy day. I bought 1 gallon of gas for $6 ($1.50/liter) in the middle of nowhere. I think that's the most I've ever paid. The guy was irked that I only wanted 4 liters.

Glad you are having a good time! I'm guessing you may have purchased your fuel by the station at the Crossing. Ironically oil is drilled about 2 hours drive from there and refined about 5 hours drive from there.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #32 on: June 04, 2015, 02:55:39 PM »
The station was about halfway between the Jasper/Banff border and Lake Louise. They had a monopoly.

The weather cleared up quite a bit today so we went back to Lakes Louise and Moraine. They were so different without the cloud cover. And the mountains are lovely. We also went to Yoho today. There's so much water up here.

Also, Canada seems to be one big school zone. Especially in the parks. Even on pretty wide roads with no pedestrian areas nearby, the speed limit is often 30kmh or 50kmh. We have school zones where I live that have speed limits faster than that. And we don't have many sidewalks either.

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #33 on: June 04, 2015, 02:58:18 PM »
haha yeah lower speed limits in Canada.

in Toronto most of the highways are 100 which is 62mph.


I know in Atlanta we have 70 mph highways now.

choppingwood

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #34 on: June 04, 2015, 10:06:18 PM »
Also, Canada seems to be one big school zone. Especially in the parks. Even on pretty wide roads with no pedestrian areas nearby, the speed limit is often 30kmh or 50kmh. We have school zones where I live that have speed limits faster than that. And we don't have many sidewalks either.

It saves a lot of non-human pedestrians in the parks. Elk and moose and mountain sheep and goats and bears have minimal traffic skills. (Though I once saw a bear in Cold Lake suburbs following all the pedestrian traffic safety rules, including looking both ways and walking facing the traffic along the side of the road. His mama did a good job teaching him how to coexist with humans!) And also, you're not in any hurry, eh?

Glad you are having a great trip. You are seeing all the right things. I'm impressed you went back the second day to see Moraine Lake.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #35 on: June 06, 2015, 07:18:58 AM »
Waterton Lakes NP is a nice little park. The hike up Bear Hump is less than a mile (a bit steep) but has a great view. There were a bunch of squirrels up there because people feed them. Someone was letting a squirrel play around their backpack and taking pictures. Then they left it open and walked away. So one got inside and scurried around for awhile. Then the owner freaked when I told her and found out her stuff was now wet. What did you expect? Turns out the bag was a loaner. Poor friend getting back squirrel pee bag.

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #36 on: June 13, 2015, 09:34:26 AM »
Spent 6 days in Glacier NP. The glaciers have almost all melted. Kind of sad. There were over 100 in the early 1900s and a couple dozen are left now. They are projected to be completely gone by 2030, and perhaps as early as 2020. The southwest half of the park only has about 4 small ones left.

The park is very pretty though. Saw some moose, bears, a marmot, a wolf, sheep, etc. Iceberg lake was pretty neat. The ends of a bunch of the trails are still impassable in the higher elevations due to snow on certain parts of the trails. But the views are still great. The trails should be clear in the next week or so due as the melting finishes.

forummm

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RichMoose

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #38 on: June 13, 2015, 06:05:41 PM »
Spent 6 days in Glacier NP. The glaciers have almost all melted. Kind of sad. There were over 100 in the early 1900s and a couple dozen are left now. They are projected to be completely gone by 2030, and perhaps as early as 2020. The southwest half of the park only has about 4 small ones left.

The park is very pretty though. Saw some moose, bears, a marmot, a wolf, sheep, etc. Iceberg lake was pretty neat. The ends of a bunch of the trails are still impassable in the higher elevations due to snow on certain parts of the trails. But the views are still great. The trails should be clear in the next week or so due as the melting finishes.

Sounds like you're enjoying your trip! I've got to go down and check out Waterton one of these summers...

forummm

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #39 on: June 13, 2015, 07:00:07 PM »
Spent 6 days in Glacier NP. The glaciers have almost all melted. Kind of sad. There were over 100 in the early 1900s and a couple dozen are left now. They are projected to be completely gone by 2030, and perhaps as early as 2020. The southwest half of the park only has about 4 small ones left.

The park is very pretty though. Saw some moose, bears, a marmot, a wolf, sheep, etc. Iceberg lake was pretty neat. The ends of a bunch of the trails are still impassable in the higher elevations due to snow on certain parts of the trails. But the views are still great. The trails should be clear in the next week or so due as the melting finishes.

Sounds like you're enjoying your trip! I've got to go down and check out Waterton one of these summers...

Yes, it's worth a visit. You should cross over to the Many Glacier section of Glacier NP on the US side too while you're there. Canadians need a passport, but not a visa. It's maybe an hour drive from Waterton. There are a lot of great trails and lakes. The Saint Mary section (another 20 minutes south) has a scenic road (Going to the Sun Road) that will take you all the way across the park (just go in late June or afterwards to make sure the road is plowed and open).

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Re: Questions about visiting Canada
« Reply #40 on: June 13, 2015, 08:07:24 PM »
If you do go over to the US side, it's really pretty quick to cross the border by car (took us a couple minutes each way). Just don't bring certain items with you. I think most produce from Canada would be OK. For example, our BC apples were fine, but they would have not allowed apples from certain South American countries. Don't bring wood from the forest, etc.