Author Topic: Question about 403(b) rollover  (Read 1817 times)

mrteacher

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Question about 403(b) rollover
« on: May 07, 2017, 11:46:50 AM »
I'd like to get informed now, as there is a good chance I will be switching jobs in the next couple months, at which point I will have roughly $50,000 in my 403(b). I am curious as to how best handle that money. This is how I believe the options are best ranked in my situation. 

(A) - rollover to IRA. I have been contributing to my Roth IRA for 9 years and already maxed it out for 2017. I could rollover into that Roth account, but I would be better off having my 403(b) rolled over to a Traditional IRA so as to avoid the taxes, right? My big question here is since I've already maxed my Roth for 2017, is it possible to open a traditional through Vanguard and have my first 'contribution' be this rollover?
(B) - if I can't do option (A), leave the fund alone until Jan 1, 2018, at which point I could initiate the rollover into the Traditional IRA (that is, if my former employer is ok with this).
(C) - rollover to my new company's 401(k)/403(b)

What is the best route to take? Any other options that I did not include?

Thanks!

Ocinfo

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Question about 403(b) rollover
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2017, 11:55:23 AM »
In most cases, roll over to an IRA at Vanguard, Schwab, Fidelity, etc...Yearly contribution limits are not affect by rollovers.

Alternatively, if your company offers good funds, you can likely just leave it (I have access to Fidelity Spartan funds with .04 to .07% expense ratios).


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MDM

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Re: Question about 403(b) rollover
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2017, 12:29:24 PM »
In most cases, roll over to an IRA at Vanguard, Schwab, Fidelity, etc...Yearly contribution limits are not affect by rollovers.

Alternatively, if your company offers good funds, you can likely just leave it (I have access to Fidelity Spartan funds with .04 to .07% expense ratios).
+1.  Note especially the highlighted sentence.

What is the best route to take?
In general, putting the money into the account that provides your desired asset allocation with the lowest fees.  That is usually an IRA, but is sometimes a 401k that uses institutional class funds.

Where does your income fall in terms of tIRA Deduction Limits and Roth IRA Contribution limits?

mrteacher

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Re: Question about 403(b) rollover
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2017, 12:35:09 PM »
My wife and I will gross around $100,000 in 2017.

And I understand that rollovers do not count to contribution limits, but would vanguard allow me to open a tIRA without making an initial investment, into which I would rollover my funds?
« Last Edit: May 07, 2017, 12:40:13 PM by mrteacher »

MDM

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Re: Question about 403(b) rollover
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2017, 12:40:16 PM »
My wife and I will gross around $100,000 in 2017.
In which case you have no need to worry about a backdoor Roth and can simply look for the lowest fee option.

MDM

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Re: Question about 403(b) rollover
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2017, 12:41:13 PM »
My wife and I will gross around $100,000 in 2017.
...would vanguard allow me to open a tIRA without making an initial investment, into which I would rollover my funds?
See Open an IRA account in 3 easy steps | Vanguard.

letired

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Re: Question about 403(b) rollover
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2017, 01:08:33 PM »
And I understand that rollovers do not count to contribution limits, but would vanguard allow me to open a tIRA without making an initial investment, into which I would rollover my funds?

I can't speak to Vanguard, but I have a 'rollover' IRA with Fidelity that has never received any money except the funds from an old 403b. My understanding is that it is a completely normal thing to do.