Author Topic: Psychological advice?  (Read 5321 times)

Cwadda

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Psychological advice?
« on: June 08, 2015, 11:58:16 AM »
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« Last Edit: October 11, 2016, 01:30:15 PM by Cwadda »

matchewed

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2015, 12:03:44 PM »
There should be several resources for mental health at school. I urge you to seek out these resources.

Erica/NWEdible

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2015, 12:20:29 PM »
Could be mild depression or cyclothymia. Could just be a life transition. Could be honestly just looking around and not giving a shit about what your peers are doing. Could be nothing "big" at all. In any event, it's bothering you enough that you are asking about it.

Read this: http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2013/05/depression-part-two.html and if it connects with you, go talk to a mental health professional.

AJ

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2015, 12:23:56 PM »
A counselor is like a personal trainer for your mind - if you can afford it (or can get it for free from your school) it is totally worth it! I feel quite well-adjusted, and I still grew loads as a person from my few sessions with a counselor. I would go indefinitely if it wasn't so expensive. If you have access at your school, take advantage of that shit now while you can! Nothing is more mustachian than getting stuff for free :) 

That being said, start tracking your symptoms as best you can. What is the weather like when you feel this way - could it be a vit D deficiency? What is happening in your life when the waves come? Does it coincide with stress or life changes? That's probably hard to say, since at your age stress and life changes are pretty frequent, but just record as best you can. Track your diet and exercise, you may see patterns. Keep track of drug use (alcohol and cannabis can act as depressants when used regularly, not just when you're on them.)

One thing that took me way too long to learn is that stress has a profound impact on my psychological well being, and the effects last longer than I expected. I assumed I would get better immediately after the stress ended. When that didn't happen, I began to worry this was my new normal. But it just took a few months for my body (mind?) to realize the stress was over and dial back the cortisol.

The other thing I would add is that during these waves, you might want to hold off on making any life changes.

Bob W

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2015, 12:26:20 PM »
Sounds pretty typical for most people.   The "apathy" you describe my be a cyclical type of depression.   Again,  more the norm than unusual.   

Apathy and depression are pretty easy to cure if you want to.    Exercise,  walking and exposure to sunlight (on the skin 20 minutes minimum per day) is generally enough to kick start your enthusiasm. 

You could also start a HIT workout program to bump up your testosterone and growth hormones a bit.   

Cpa Cat

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2015, 12:47:05 PM »
Make use of your student mental health services - they will be cheap (probably free) and will specialize in the issues that are impacting you now, which seem common to your age group.

Also bear in mind that at 20, your brain is actually still developing. It is not uncommon at all for people in their early 20s to experience mental "growing pains."

Keep in mind that you cared enough and were concerned enough about your thoughts/feelings to post here. At the least, establishing a relationship with a counselor could help you have someone to fall back on during your "down" periods. Remember that just because some of these issues may be normal or common to people your age, that doesn't mean that counseling won't be helpful to you.

milliemchi

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2015, 01:26:22 PM »

Hi, while I concur with everything already posted, I just wanted to add some more information that may be relevant.  At your age, you're in the right demographic to develop a mood disorder such as depression (~10-15% of population), or bipolar disorder (1-3% of population). Just to mention, bipolar does not appear in real life as it does in the movies. Most people spend most of the time either healthy or depressed, but different medication is used since risks are different. As already suggested, keep track of your cycles.

BTW, apathy never killed anyone, and a little bit can actually improve the lives of overly stressed, type-A, over-controlling individuals, IMO. But you did not present yourself as such, and "overwhelming" is a strong word. When emotional bumps in the road cause problems in functioning (which you don't mention), or cause distress (which seems to be the only problem you have now), they cross over into medical problems, and medicine can help, either in the form of counseling, or medication.

Emotional "growing pains" are common (though more so in puberty, I think), and this all may go away. But keep your eyes open, long term. You know yourself best, and you are your own best advocate. BTW, if anyone diagnoses you as depressed, look for a "blue light" or "mood light" as an alternative to medication, especially so if your apathy keeps happening in the fall/winter when days are shorter.

Good luck!

frugaldrummer

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2015, 05:43:50 PM »
I second the advice above.  Be aware that this MIGHT represent a very very mild form of bipolar disorder.

My ex-husband was like this.  Most of the time very effective and energetic, but periodic episodes of existential angst lasting about a month for no apparent reason.  We didn't think much about it in his 20's, but by his 40's the swings were higher and lower, and by the time he turned 50 he divorced me in a mid-life crisis.

Now, granted, there were other factors involved in the divorce.  BUT - once I was OUT of the relationship, I began to see a lot more clearly how typical his symptoms were for mild bipolar.

 I don't mean to say you will automatically go on to develop full-blown bipolar - odds are you won't - but I would do everything in your power to avoid that possibility.  Proper diet, sleep, exercise, vitamin D, fish oil may all help. Check your thyroid.  Try a gluten-free diet.

Kiwi Mustache

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2015, 06:12:27 PM »
I'm 26, male, been through all the same things you talk about.

I got half way through uni and was unsure of if it was the right course for me. I spent 5 years trying to figure out a career and still not 100% sure on it yet. I recently broke up with a girlfriend/fiancée of 6 years and feeling pretty low about it all. I had to sell our house we had together, I've gone through chronic fatigue from overdoing exercise for 10-11 months a year or so ago. I've had heaps of friends, and then no friends. I've been broke and been well off financially. I've been to two life/career coaches.

I still haven't figured a lot of stuff out.

If you want to talk away PM me. 

TheBuddha

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2015, 06:59:24 PM »
Could be mild depression or cyclothymia.

+1 Cyclothymia.

The manic periods make it worth it though ;)

Allie

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2015, 07:13:53 PM »
+1 to everyone who has said mild depression or cyclothymia.  You're the just right demographic to develop a mood disorder.  You could start with small changes and see how it goes, but I would recommend taking it seriously and seeking out professional assistance to address all possible avenues to improve and stabilize your mood.  A doctor/psychiatrist can offer a consultation regarding medications and lifestyle changes, a therapist can assist ongoing support and lifestyle stuff.  What good reason is there to feel like crap if you don't have to?  None. 

If you happen to just go see a regular doctor and get an antidepressant, then swing to having a great mood and all your friends are like, WTF is wrong with OXp?  and you think you have never been better, go find a real psychiatrist because you probably have a bipolar disorder. 

Any family history of mood dx?  If yes, definitely go see someone.

Cwadda

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #11 on: June 09, 2015, 06:32:54 AM »
Thanks everyone! I'll talk to mental health services  when I go back to school at the end of June!

Bob W

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #12 on: June 09, 2015, 08:03:23 AM »
Thanks everyone! I'll talk to mental health services  when I go back to school at the end of June!

That's great but remember that mental health services typically will not "fix" your issue.  That will be up to you.   Also the end of June is 2.5 weeks away.

I strongly suggest you do a bit of a Google research on exercise and sun light in relation to mood.   As I recall exercise is more effective than any current antidepressant drugs or therapies.   

It is a very simple thing to do as well.  Simply walking or bike riding with your shirt off in the sun for 30 minutes per day can be very effective.  Vitamin D is often low in most people.  So catching sun on your back over a number of weeks helps increase that.

My guess if you do some exercise and sun exposure by the end of June you will be feeling pretty good. 

Good luck ---

Cwadda

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2015, 08:10:07 AM »
Thanks everyone! I'll talk to mental health services  when I go back to school at the end of June!

That's great but remember that mental health services typically will not "fix" your issue.  That will be up to you.   Also the end of June is 2.5 weeks away.

I strongly suggest you do a bit of a Google research on exercise and sun light in relation to mood.   As I recall exercise is more effective than any current antidepressant drugs or therapies.   

It is a very simple thing to do as well.  Simply walking or bike riding with your shirt off in the sun for 30 minutes per day can be very effective.  Vitamin D is often low in most people.  So catching sun on your back over a number of weeks helps increase that.

My guess if you do some exercise and sun exposure by the end of June you will be feeling pretty good. 

Good luck ---

I do exercise. Not as much recently. But over the whole last semester. Also at school I will be outside everyday and there is a school gym I'll be going to several times per week.
I take vitamins every day too.

milliemchi

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2015, 10:15:58 AM »
It is great that you decided to be proactive with your health. From a long term point of view, keep in mind that student services and general practice/family doctors are much more likely to diagnose depression, even when bipolar disorder is the real disease, simply because it is more likely, and they see it so much more often. So, whatever they tell you, keep your eyes open, and keep track of what's happening to you, especially if you end up taking anything that lifts mood (exercise and blue light included).

In case the last several comments made you even more depressed apathetic, I want to reiterate that bipolar disorder is not like what you see in movies. It is treatable, and many people achieve great things living with it, including happy, productive lives and loving families.  It is the neglected, untreated, or incorrectly treated disease that lands people on disability or evening news. I hope you won't have to worry about it, though, and odds are you won't.

So good luck at your appointment, and never forget that you need to take care of yourself.

TheBuddha

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2015, 12:54:10 PM »
Thanks everyone! I'll talk to mental health services  when I go back to school at the end of June!
[...]

My guess if you do some exercise and sun exposure by the end of June you will be feeling pretty good. 

I do exercise. Not as much recently. But over the whole last semester. Also at school I will be outside everyday and there is a school gym I'll be going to several times per week.
I take vitamins every day too.

I've found that vitamin D3 (liquid) makes a noticeable difference in my mood. I also used to take SAM-e. It's expensive, but really works. (It's a prescription drug in Europe but here in the States it's OTC.)

Exercise is super effective, but when you're bummed, you don't have the energy to exercise. What I used to do is force myself to exercise by drinking two energy drinks. Either you'll start exercising or your heart will burst out of your chest ;)

Be careful of the antidepressant drugs that may be prescribed to you. I once saw the campus doctor for mild depression/anxiety and she immediately wanted to put me on Effexor. NO THANKS lol

Lis

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Re: Psychological advice?
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2015, 03:38:16 PM »
I am so thrilled to read that so many people are (positively) suggesting counseling. There can be such a stigma about talking to a professional, and while I see it fading away, it still can exist.

The best decision I ever made was going to the Counseling Center during my junior year of college. I hated my major too and started to get zero enjoyment from things I had loved (my a cappella group, my campus job, even hanging out with my friends). It can be really amazing what a trained professional can uncover - they know the right questions to ask.

Do yourself a favor and promise to stick it out for a few sessions. I thought my first session was a complete waste of time, and the only reason I went back was because my counselor had already scheduled my next meeting, and I hated disappointing people (one of the reasons I was going).

There's a common misconception that depression is just feeling sad all the time. It can be a wide mix of emotions, including apathy, especially towards things you once enjoyed. Allie at Hyperbole and a Half wrote an amazing post on depression. Not saying you're at that point, but you sound like you're at the same point I was and I was teetering on depression. You can take a look at it here: http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2013/05/depression-part-two.html