Author Topic: Protein Powder Prices  (Read 14383 times)

chops

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Protein Powder Prices
« on: March 08, 2014, 09:12:30 PM »
Question about Protein Powder, I'd like to start adding it to smoothies to turn them into meals but the cheapest pricing I've seen is $7-8/pound, which seems much more expensive than meat.  Is it because protein powder has more concentrated protein than meat? 

Also, if anyone has any great inexpensive links to protein powder that they like, please post 'em up!  Thanks!


ratrationale

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2014, 09:29:43 PM »
I bought some protein powder this week and couldn't really find lower than $7/8 pound. It is an expensive product and might not be necessary in a normal diet, but if you have food restrictions (i.e.: vegan & allergic to nuts) and train a lot, it could be beneficial. If buying online, I would suggest doing a quick google search for coupons, many companies offer them. Doing this reduced my bill by 5%.

snyder66

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2014, 06:21:18 AM »
First, Ask yourself if you really need that much added protein in your diet.  Protein consumption is way overrated.

panthalassa

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2014, 08:03:44 AM »
First, Ask yourself if you really need that much added protein in your diet.  Protein consumption is way overrated.

What a condescending and wholly unhelpful comment.

Make sure you look at it more as a price per gram of protein rather than price per pound of product. 

So, looks like whey protein isolate is slightly less than chicken breasts.

Thanks for doing the math on that.  I regularly drink protein powder shakes to replace at least one meal a day to keep my calories down so I search for the cheapest powder I can stomach.  I should do the math on my brand too.  The brand I like is not as cheap as that whey isolate Knaak described but I was able to find it MUCH cheaper than I had originally been paying thanks to a little sleuthing.

DK

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2014, 08:23:20 AM »
A few places I've used:

t-nation.com/store
vitaminshoppe.com
proteinfactory.com

I wouldn't necessarily try to find the cheapest, but the best for your money. Your cheapest tub o whey could put you into the bathroom after you take it (it did for me!). So try to find one that has more isolate than concentrate.

Fireman

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2014, 08:42:53 AM »
Target and Walmart also carry protein and i've even seen it at a reduced price at Target.  I used to get it at GNC (or from their website) as they would reduce the price often enough that I could stock up.  IIRC, Amazon has some decent deals on protein but I haven't checked in a while.

When I was spending a lot of time in the gym, i'd have protein after my workout to keep my energy up and appetite down until my next regularly scheduled meal.  I had not considered it as a meal replacement option, though.

ratrationale

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2014, 08:46:29 AM »
Forgot to say, I went with TrueNutrition.com. Nice website, heard it's good quality products and you can customize your own protein mix if wanted (i.e.: say you want 80% whey protein isolate and 20% beef protein isolate).

DocCyane

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2014, 08:53:47 AM »
First, Ask yourself if you really need that much added protein in your diet.  Protein consumption is way overrated.

What a condescending and wholly unhelpful comment.


It's a trend right now to say we eat too much protein, encouraged by those who don't eat meat for various reasons.

You may recall other trends like how eggs will kill you and coffee is straight from the devil.

Fireman

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2014, 09:41:47 AM »
You may recall other trends like how eggs will kill you and coffee is straight from the devil.

Ah, the 'eggs are good; no they're bad; ok egg whites are fine but not the yolks; you should eat at least three eggs a week; eggs are a wonder-food' debate.

Edit:  Shit, now I want to seat some eggs!
« Last Edit: March 09, 2014, 09:44:16 AM by Fireman »

wealthviahealth

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2014, 09:44:59 AM »
 Vitacost has some really good deals on protein powder and
their own brand is actually a very good value and is significantly healthier ( fewer ingredients/higher quality ingredients)
than many of the other big names they sell.
I bought (2) two pound tubs of their ARO Chocolate whey on a buy one get one half off totaling $29 out the door
with free shipping, since they offer free shipping on the purchase of $25 or more of their brand.

I have an affiliate link in my signature that gives a $10 coupon on the purchase of $30 or more. ( I also get $10)

Other recommendations;
If you live in the midwest- Meijer sells their in house brand called bodylogix that is around $20 for 2lbs when on sale and is also
pretty healthy/ tasty.

Amazon; they have perhaps the largest variety and prices are decent but can certainly be found cheaper elsewhere.

mcneally

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2014, 09:52:46 AM »
First, Ask yourself if you really need that much added protein in your diet.  Protein consumption is way overrated.

What a condescending and wholly unhelpful comment.


It's a trend right now to say we eat too much protein, encouraged by those who don't eat meat for various reasons.

You may recall other trends like how eggs will kill you and coffee is straight from the devil.

I'm sure you (OP) have done your own research and we know nothing at all about you other than you want to put protein powder in smoothies, but Snyder's suggestion was not at all condescending and it's not out of the question that it would be helpful.

From WebMD:
"Although important in the diet, extra protein will not help you build more muscle or make you stronger...How much protein is enough?...about 46 grams of protein for women, and 56 grams of protein for men... Endurance athletes such as marathoners need about 50% more protein than a sedentary person...Body Builders might need twice as much protein as a sedentary person. But it's important to remember than most Americans, including athletes, get plenty of protein in their regular diet, and do not need protein supplements. "

http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthy-kitchen-11/how-much-protein

DK

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2014, 11:31:04 AM »
Here's a recent article somewhat-concerning the topic:

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/protein-limit

LDoon

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2014, 11:31:33 AM »
Most people that I know consume protein shakes after a workout because it is quick and easier to stomach than having more chicken.  It's not just the amount of protein consumption, it is also about the timing.  Much more useful to spread protein consumption throughout the day, rather than concentrated in 1 or 2 meals.

Citing the beloved WedMD (in which all things lead to cancer):
Why do you need to eat protein or drink protein shakes after exercising?

Muscles need protein for recovery and growth, and the best time to deliver protein appears to be right after exercise. Providing high-quality protein after exercise gives your muscles the fuel and the building blocks needed for both repair and for growth.

Protein shakes and powders carry a certain allure, but your muscles donít care if the protein comes from a hard-boiled egg, glass of chocolate milk or whey protein shake.  Whatever you choose, more isnít better -- only 10 to 20 grams of protein is needed to provide amino acids (the building blocks of protein) to muscles.


http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/what-eat-before-during-after-exercise?page=2

So protein shakes are quick, easy, and hopefully with helpful advice from forum users, will be cheaper for panthalassa.

DK

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2014, 11:36:46 AM »
First, Ask yourself if you really need that much added protein in your diet.  Protein consumption is way overrated.

What a condescending and wholly unhelpful comment.


It's a trend right now to say we eat too much protein, encouraged by those who don't eat meat for various reasons.

You may recall other trends like how eggs will kill you and coffee is straight from the devil.

I'm sure you (OP) have done your own research and we know nothing at all about you other than you want to put protein powder in smoothies, but Snyder's suggestion was not at all condescending and it's not out of the question that it would be helpful.

From WebMD:
"Although important in the diet, extra protein will not help you build more muscle or make you stronger...How much protein is enough?...about 46 grams of protein for women, and 56 grams of protein for men... Endurance athletes such as marathoners need about 50% more protein than a sedentary person...Body Builders might need twice as much protein as a sedentary person. But it's important to remember than most Americans, including athletes, get plenty of protein in their regular diet, and do not need protein supplements. "

http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthy-kitchen-11/how-much-protein

Getting nutrition/health information from a mainstream source like WebMD is like getting investing advice from a mainstream site. I think MMM members can do better. Especially considering regardless of weight and activity (unless you are a bodybuilder or endurance athlete) it is saying EVERY man needs 56g and EVERY woman needs 46g? How generic advice. If I'm remembering right from the literature, .8g/kg of bodyweight is the minimum, and for active/athletic people that can go up to 1.5-1.6g/kg of bodyweight.

mm1970

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2014, 11:42:03 AM »
First, Ask yourself if you really need that much added protein in your diet.  Protein consumption is way overrated.
It really depends on your goals.

If you are trying to build muscle, or training for a competition, additional protein is useful.

If you are trying to lose weight, I've found that extra protein curbs cravings and using at least a temporary increase in protein and lowering the carbs helps with that.

I used to be mostly vegetarian.  Love my beans and rice.  But now that I'm older and can't run, I have found that this kind of diet makes it very difficult to lose weight.  I hope that I will able to go back to more beans/less animal protein once I've hit my goal weight (most studies still show that people who eat fewer animal products live longer and are  healthier).  But I still have to get from point A to point B.

FuckRx

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2014, 01:33:48 PM »

fuck webMD here is a real MD... don't take protein powder, period. what's condescending about that? if you want to take it and have your mind set on taking it nobody is gonna stop you. excess protein can increase your risk of various medical conditions. supplements are also not regulated the way the general public thinks of medicines being regulated. a company making protein powder for weight gain may/will add some nasty shit in there that can fuck with your kidenys and liver.

ratrationale

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #16 on: March 09, 2014, 03:11:08 PM »
Not arguing that there might be issues with excess protein intake, but there are also issues with having a diet too little in protein intake, something you can't just ignore. With a diet too low in protein, your body can lack amino acids, so your body's first reaction is to break down your muscles. Over time, it can be very detrimental to your body. So for some people, protein supplements may be beneficial.

As for nasty shit being added to protein powders, it is a concern and it does unfortunately occur, hence why people here suggested looking for good quality proteins and reliable companies. It is not difficult to find a protein powder which contains only 1 ingredient and where the protein was concentrated without the use of chemicals.

snyder66

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #17 on: March 09, 2014, 04:45:48 PM »
I wasn't trying to be condescending.  Truth is, Thanks to Meat, Egg, and Dairy lobbies, Many of us a duped into to thinking we need more protein.  We is the last time you ever heard someone with a protein deficiency?  On that note...Hemp Protein is fairly reasonable and contains 1 ingredient.

limeandpepper

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2014, 08:20:50 PM »
Question about Protein Powder, I'd like to start adding it to smoothies to turn them into meals

The OP wants to make a full meal out of a smoothie. I think wanting to add protein to it, in this case, is absolutely understandable. It's not so easy to feel full, otherwise. Might not have anything to do with a misguided quest for excessive protein.

So, to get back to the main discussion... yes, as far as I know, protein powder is more concentrated in protein than most other sources, so it could be worth it.

If you're seeking a more wholesome option, you can look into adding natural sources of protein into your smoothies, though you'll need to use more of them to get the same amount of protein and therefore could turn out more expensive, compared to if you were using the powder. E.g. nuts, yoghurt, even raw eggs, if you're not iffy about them. I prefer minimally-processed sources, but I do also have a tub of protein powder - I chose a good quality pea protein powder, which I have to say doesn't taste great, but I am able to camouflage it with other things I add to my smoothie.

ratrationale

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2014, 08:44:02 PM »
The RDA of protein typically seen is 0.8g/kg/day for men and women. Pregnant and lactating women require more protein, 1.1g/kg/day and 1.3g/kg/day respectively. In other words, a man or woman of 70kg requires 56g/day of protein, a pregnant woman 77g/day and a lactating woman 91g/day. As a quick rule of thumb, you can approximate 7g of protein per oz (28.35g) for fish or meat. Have a 6oz steak for supper and you're already at 42g of proteins, so reaching minimums shouldn't be an issue.

If you don't eat much animal protein though (i.e.: vegetarian), none at all (i.e.: vegan), or simply lowered your food portions a lot for weight loss, reaching those numbers every single day requires some meal planning. Furthermore, most plant based proteins need to be mixed to offer 9 essential amino acids, which adds complexity to the diet. Adding a complete protein supplement (i.e.: hemp protein being one of them) can be useful in those scenarios. Not sure what's the goal of turning a smoothie into a meal here (weight loss? gain? simple quick meal?), but protein supplements seem like a reasonable, not too expensive per portion protein choice. At 8$ per pound, 30g per serving, that's about 50 cents per smoothie.

Here's a link going into more details on the subject, it's from the Institute of Medecine of the National Academies: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/DRI/Essential_Guide/DRIEssentialGuideNutReq.pdf

greaper007

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2014, 09:04:56 PM »

fuck webMD here is a real MD... don't take protein powder, period. what's condescending about that? if you want to take it and have your mind set on taking it nobody is gonna stop you. excess protein can increase your risk of various medical conditions. supplements are also not regulated the way the general public thinks of medicines being regulated. a company making protein powder for weight gain may/will add some nasty shit in there that can fuck with your kidenys and liver.

Thanks, I've been leaning this way with all vitamins and supplements lately.   I still take a baby aspirin everyday but that's it. 

What do you think an appropriate level of protein intake is for a fairly active 33 year old male.   I do 3 day splits with about an hour of weights and try to run, bike and swim fairly often.   Is 1-1.3 grams per lean pound of body weight appropriate?

Metta

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2014, 06:12:19 AM »
Question about Protein Powder, I'd like to start adding it to smoothies to turn them into meals but the cheapest pricing I've seen is $7-8/pound, which seems much more expensive than meat.  Is it because protein powder has more concentrated protein than meat? 

Also, if anyone has any great inexpensive links to protein powder that they like, please post 'em up!  Thanks!

You didn't specify the type of protein powder but we've bought Soy Protein Isolate for years from Honeyville and have been very pleased with it. There is nothing in it but soy protein isolate (no sugars, no extra supplements) and it doesn't have a rancid taste as many store-bought proteins do. They charge $23 for 4 pounds which works out to 5.75 a pound. If you also buy your bulk flour, beans, and other bulk items from them, the shipping is negligible at only 4.49 for the entire order.

Here is a link to the protein powder: http://shop.honeyville.com/products/soy-tvp-products/soy-protein-isolate.html

That said, I should mention that with the current research on excess protein, we've also stopped adding isolated protein to our diets and have been enjoying beans and grains for our protein needs. But those also come from Honeyville at reasonably good prices.

Carolyn

freeedom

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2014, 06:40:14 AM »
Keep an eye on Slickdeals.net, and set up an alert. They pop up every now and then. Most contain superfluous amounts of sugar... but this kind is good: http://www.amazon.com/Optimum-Nutrition-100-Chocolate-powder/dp/B000GIQT06/ref=pd_sim_hpc_5?ie=UTF8&refRID=1XFJTV52H2NWE279Y6VF

TomTX

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2014, 07:10:41 AM »
I wasn't trying to be condescending.  Truth is, Thanks to Meat, Egg, and Dairy lobbies, Many of us a duped into to thinking we need more protein.  We is the last time you ever heard someone with a protein deficiency?  On that note...Hemp Protein is fairly reasonable and contains 1 ingredient.

When comparing protein sources, you should keep the BV (Biological Value) in mind - basically the efficiency of turning food protein into structure, instead of burning it for fuel.

Admittedly this is from a whey protein site (they had the most complete chart on a quick check)
- but you can find BV plenty of other places.

http://wheyproteinpowder.webs.com/

From what I recall, BV on hemp protein is darn low.

captainawesome

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2014, 11:10:10 AM »
Most people that I know consume protein shakes after a workout because it is quick and easier to stomach than having more chicken.  It's not just the amount of protein consumption, it is also about the timing.  Much more useful to spread protein consumption throughout the day, rather than concentrated in 1 or 2 meals.

Citing the beloved WedMD (in which all things lead to cancer):
Why do you need to eat protein or drink protein shakes after exercising?

Muscles need protein for recovery and growth, and the best time to deliver protein appears to be right after exercise. Providing high-quality protein after exercise gives your muscles the fuel and the building blocks needed for both repair and for growth.

Protein shakes and powders carry a certain allure, but your muscles donít care if the protein comes from a hard-boiled egg, glass of chocolate milk or whey protein shake.  Whatever you choose, more isnít better -- only 10 to 20 grams of protein is needed to provide amino acids (the building blocks of protein) to muscles.


http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/what-eat-before-during-after-exercise?page=2

So protein shakes are quick, easy, and hopefully with helpful advice from forum users, will be cheaper for panthalassa.
^not so much. While some of what you said is true (protein source is irrelevant) the rest is false  Timing doesn't matter and if you eat more it won't necessarily hurt you (within reason). A lot of those broscience myths have been proven wrong. BUT to the OP's point, check out deals on DPSnutrition.net. Consistently low prices for anything you might want. Stick with a reputable company (MusclePharm, Optimum, Gaspari). Yes they aren't regulated by the FDA but a lot of independent testing is done by NSF and such, just look for the approval on the product and at the very least there won't be banned substances in it.  Doesn't guarantee the quality though.

plantingourpennies

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2014, 11:45:25 AM »
Make sure you look at it more as a price per gram of protein rather than price per pound of product. 

I just bought a 10lb bag of whey protein isolate for $100.  Yeah, it sucks paying $10/lb, especially when the same thing was $15 cheaper a year ago.  But, it is 99.x% whey protein isolate (<1% of soy lecithin).

Looking at the nutrition facts, one serving of whey has 25g of protein and there are 162 servings per container.  So, it is ~$0.62 per serving for 25g of protein.  A chicken breast has about 7g of protein per ounce, so you need 3.6oz to equal one serving of whey protein isolate.  Boneless skinless chicken breasts at Costco right now are $3.19/lb.  That's $0.20/oz x 3.6oz = $0.72 for 25g of protein.

So, looks like whey protein isolate is slightly less than chicken breasts.

These are the kinds of calculations we do, as we're still exploring which brands we like the best and provide the best value.  But one additional calculation is how much added sugar there is in each serving and how much you are willing to pay to keep that out - in the same way that we pay more for leaner cuts of meat for Mr PoP.

Can't remember the brands now, but one had an extra 100 calories (in mostly added sugars) per serving (25g of protein), but cost 5-10 cents more per serving.  For me, it was worth paying a little more to get it without the added sugars.  YMMV.

GuitarStv

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2014, 01:30:56 PM »
The RDA of protein typically seen is 0.8g/kg/day for men and women. Pregnant and lactating women require more protein, 1.1g/kg/day and 1.3g/kg/day respectively. In other words, a man or woman of 70kg requires 56g/day of protein, a pregnant woman 77g/day and a lactating woman 91g/day. As a quick rule of thumb, you can approximate 7g of protein per oz (28.35g) for fish or meat. Have a 6oz steak for supper and you're already at 42g of proteins, so reaching minimums shouldn't be an issue.

If you don't eat much animal protein though (i.e.: vegetarian), none at all (i.e.: vegan), or simply lowered your food portions a lot for weight loss, reaching those numbers every single day requires some meal planning. Furthermore, most plant based proteins need to be mixed to offer 9 essential amino acids, which adds complexity to the diet. Adding a complete protein supplement (i.e.: hemp protein being one of them) can be useful in those scenarios. Not sure what's the goal of turning a smoothie into a meal here (weight loss? gain? simple quick meal?), but protein supplements seem like a reasonable, not too expensive per portion protein choice. At 8$ per pound, 30g per serving, that's about 50 cents per smoothie.

Here's a link going into more details on the subject, it's from the Institute of Medecine of the National Academies: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/DRI/Essential_Guide/DRIEssentialGuideNutReq.pdf

The RDA may be true for sedentary people, but it's not the case at all for athletic people.  Endurance athletes require between 1.2-1.4 g/kg and with strength training recommendations are closer to 1.8 g per kg of body weight (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psychology/health_psychology/Protein.htm)

Quote from: [url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17213878
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17213878[/url]]Of relevance to athletes and those in clinical practice is the fact that higher protein diets have quite consistently been shown to result in greater weight loss, greater fat loss, and preservation of lean mass as compared with "lower" protein diets.

wealthviahealth

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2014, 02:20:52 PM »
I think this thread is getting off a ways from the posters original question.
Whether or not you identify with low protein or high protein diet doesn't help this particular thread much and there are plenty other identical debates on health forums on separate sites.

Without getting into my perspective on the macronutrient; protein powder has a variety of very practical uses and can fit very well into a budget conscious plan. 

One of my favorite cheap/healthy meals while in a rush is a shake made only with
carrots, 1 banana, a scoop of vanilla protein powder, and a pinch of sea salt and perhaps some coconut oil for fat.
This is an extremely inexpensive and healthy meal and the protein powder really is the force multiplier here as carrots and a banana is obviously not a sensible meal by itself.

Chuck

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2014, 02:28:00 PM »
I'm going to echo the people cautioning against zealous price hunting on protein. Quality stuff is typically going to run you nine or ten bucks a pound. If it's cheaper, there's probably a reason.

Take solace in the fact that you aren't paying 35 bucks a pound like most idiots who buy from GNC.

chops

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2014, 08:55:40 PM »
Lots of great responses here, thanks! 

To clarify on my intent here, limeandpepper read me right, I'm trying to make a full meal out of a smoothie, and it's not specifically about adding protein.  However, I had heard that protein powder would work to help me feel fuller from a smoothie.

@ Carolyn  http://shop.honeyville.com/products/soy-tvp-products/soy-protein-isolate.html seems interesting (great price!), can you comment on any minuses you've experienced from using it?  And you liked the taste even better than other protein powders you tried?!  Sounds like a good option.



taekvideo

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2014, 11:18:27 PM »
I buy this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000EDG4EO/ref=rcxsubs_mys2_product_title

$6.58/lb with the 15% subscribe and save discount
Or 1.9 cents per gram of protein


But the honeyville site someone else mentioned... looks awesome, definitely looking into that, and not just for protein powder.

Gimesalot

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #31 on: March 11, 2014, 03:08:08 PM »
I have no idea if this makes sense... In another thread, someone mentioned that they use fat-free powdered milk as a protein source. 

Disclaimer:  I don;t know much about nutrition, just remember someone mentioning it.

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #32 on: March 11, 2014, 06:49:24 PM »
Does anyone have a recommendation for a site for Optimum Nutrition? Amazon is consistently in the $54 area.

wealthviahealth

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Re: Protein Powder Prices
« Reply #33 on: March 11, 2014, 07:05:57 PM »
Does anyone have a recommendation for a site for Optimum Nutrition? Amazon is consistently in the $54 area.

Not sure how many lbs you are looking for but here is 2.7lbs fro $29
http://www.vitacost.com/optimum-nutrition-gold-standard-100-whey-double-rich-chocolate-2-07-lbs-5
( non afliliate link but do have an affiliate $10 coupon in my signature ;) )