Author Topic: Promotion at work  (Read 2341 times)

ariapluscat

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Promotion at work
« on: June 07, 2016, 01:13:30 PM »
I just graduated college, in Feb. Now I'm working full time in a coordinator role, having been hired full time after working the position as a temp.

Basically, I want to know how I can pursue a promotion! How do I know if I'm doing well at work? Or find new tasks to do well?

I asked my boss how I'm doing and she says I'm doing well. But she doesn't say much about how I can improve. I think I might be overly concerned with getting feedback due to the no-grades-after-college thing. And also because sometimes I feel a little overwhelmed in the coordinator role, going between different tasks and cleaning up the errors of the person before me.

I was thinking of asking for like a mini-performance review so that I can know how I'm doing, how I could improve, and whether I'd be getting a promotion salary increase at the rate I'm going. Does that seem like a good idea?

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2016, 01:37:30 PM »
Do you work with other people senior to you who aren't this one boss? I would ask, in person, three or four people you respect, including your boss, if they would provide feedback on your performance so far and what you can improve on. I wouldn't ask about a promotion just now - you've been there four months, and you already got a "promotion" in terms of getting hired from temp.

Transitioning to the workplace is definitely befuddling but people do appreciate being asked for feedback, I've found.

SKL-HOU

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2016, 01:46:33 PM »
Typically you need to do more than your job to get a promotion. I don't think 3-4 months is enough time for them to decide on a promotion. I wouldn't ask about the promotion but maybe a mid year review.

sonjak

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2016, 01:56:35 PM »
3-4 months is too short of a time to ASK for a promotion but definitely not too short of a time to start looking at how to get one.  Eyes on the prize!

Do you have an official job description you can review?  If so, read that and see if you're doing everything on it.  If you're not, work to add those things into your normal job functions.  If there is a job description for the next job up from you (office manager maybe?), read that one too and see which of those things you could start doing (without stopping on others' toes) or start learning about. 

If you have skill gaps, look into classes you could take to build them.  Does your company have any education reimbursement?Come up with a plan for taking classes during work time and after hours so you can propose both ways with your boss and see what flies.   

I would suggest initiating a sit-down meeting with your boss in order to ask for feedback about how you're doing.  A good way to ask is "am I meeting your expectations?"  If Yes... "what would I need to do to exceed them?"  You could initiate the meeting by sending them an Outlook invite and in the body saying those are the things you'd like to discuss.  For now, don't mention the promotion desires (unless they ask where you'd like to be blah blah), just talk about wanting to excel at your current position and make their life easier.  It sounds like you're already doing that.

I really admire your focus on being good at what you're doing, your desire for feedback, etc.  You sound like someone I would be happy to hire.  :)

pbkmaine

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2016, 02:13:36 PM »
I think it's fine to ask your boss to lunch, tell her effusively how much you love working there, and ask her for career guidance. Questions like: "What do you think would be a good career path for me?" "What milestones to I need to achieve to move up the ladder? "Are there any courses or certifications you would suggest for me?" "Are there any projects that would represent value-added for the company and knowledge growth for me?" Having been a boss, I can tell you that we love eager young things.

ariapluscat

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2016, 09:25:57 AM »
Do you work with other people senior to you who aren't this one boss? I would ask, in person, three or four people you respect, including your boss, if they would provide feedback on your performance so far and what you can improve on. I wouldn't ask about a promotion just now - you've been there four months, and you already got a "promotion" in terms of getting hired from temp.

Transitioning to the workplace is definitely befuddling but people do appreciate being asked for feedback, I've found.

Yes, I'm going to talk to a person senior to me but not right in my office to find out what the process/time line would be. I'm also going to ask the person who was previously in my post.
I must've been unclear in my op. I mean more the process of doing the work rather than outright asking for a promotion.

ariapluscat

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2016, 10:32:39 AM »
3-4 months is too short of a time to ASK for a promotion but definitely not too short of a time to start looking at how to get one.  Eyes on the prize!

Do you have an official job description you can review?  If so, read that and see if you're doing everything on it.  If you're not, work to add those things into your normal job functions.  If there is a job description for the next job up from you (office manager maybe?), read that one too and see which of those things you could start doing (without stopping on others' toes) or start learning about. 

If you have skill gaps, look into classes you could take to build them.  Does your company have any education reimbursement?Come up with a plan for taking classes during work time and after hours so you can propose both ways with your boss and see what flies.   

I would suggest initiating a sit-down meeting with your boss in order to ask for feedback about how you're doing.  A good way to ask is "am I meeting your expectations?"  If Yes... "what would I need to do to exceed them?"  You could initiate the meeting by sending them an Outlook invite and in the body saying those are the things you'd like to discuss.  For now, don't mention the promotion desires (unless they ask where you'd like to be blah blah), just talk about wanting to excel at your current position and make their life easier.  It sounds like you're already doing that.

I really admire your focus on being good at what you're doing, your desire for feedback, etc.  You sound like someone I would be happy to hire.  :)

I do have a job description. I've done all the tasks in the description although some are on hold right now as I'm focusing on the budget. So far I've only gotten 'you're doing a good job' when I ask how I'm doing or how to improve. Which doesn't leave a lot of room for learning what to do, fill in, or improve on.

We do have education reimbursement, but this term I'm using it for a class I'm into rather than one related to work.
I do use the training during the work day.

I really like the idea of if yes, how can i exceed expectations because it would get the conversation past the current stopping point. Thank you!

ariapluscat

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2016, 10:33:36 AM »
I think it's fine to ask your boss to lunch, tell her effusively how much you love working there, and ask her for career guidance. Questions like: "What do you think would be a good career path for me?" "What milestones to I need to achieve to move up the ladder? "Are there any courses or certifications you would suggest for me?" "Are there any projects that would represent value-added for the company and knowledge growth for me?" Having been a boss, I can tell you that we love eager young things.

This sounds so great. My direct boss is really busy right now, but I do think she would be open to doing this in a month or so.
It gets me excited to think about learning from someone who knows so much.

James

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2016, 10:41:38 AM »
I think there is a ton of great advice here, especially from sonjak, so I won't repeat any of that. I will add one note of caution though, make sure you are not asking how you are doing too frequently. The idea about asking for a meeting is the right one, the review of your performance and significant advice should come at a meeting with your boss, not frequently in the workplace. Asking too often can lead to the impression you are insecure in yourself, and need constant praise to perform (not that you are, but it might give that impression). Doing the diligence to search and find ways to do more than expected without having to ask is always more impressive than simply asking, so make sure you continue to do that.


Good luck!

ETBen

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Re: Promotion at work
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2016, 10:43:07 AM »
It also important to take a step back and think about your boss or others you might speak to. How do they view career advancement?  I say this bc you are going to encounter generational or simply philosophical differences in perspective. You may want to accomplish more, give back more, create value. They may see that in terms of continuing to do the same work at the same quality over longer time, but with no increase in actual responsibility or opportunity. Also, what you're asking for takes a skilled manager. Many don't have the skill or time to create opportunity and give feedback.

I'm not saying to not try. But be prepared for what is a common situation that may not feel satisfying to you. You may have to go back to the drawing board in your expectations or approach.