Author Topic: New to Bikes & WTB a 4season Bike  (Read 2380 times)

och4

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New to Bikes & WTB a 4season Bike
« on: August 08, 2013, 10:04:29 AM »
I donít know dick about bikes! However I really want to start commuting to work on a bike through all 4 seasons. I think buying a used bike could be a great experience and a fun one. However I am feeling a bit overwhelmed at all the options. I would like to go fast and still be able to bike in the winter and maybe in the rain as well? Do people bike in the rain? And what about a hot summer morning, this might be a bit nasty to start off the work day. Also, I am clueless about brands and what years I should get a bike from. Could anyone recommend a good guide or help me out with these questions.

Because of the speed, I think a hybrid would be good or maybe a Cyclocross? Road bikes are good for speed, but bad in the winter right? And mountain bikes are good for off-road and winter, but terrible for speed and nice paved roads? Which one should I go for then?  For size, what should I go with? I am 5.5 tall and I thought the frame should be 15Ē or that centimeters should 50? Which measure should I go with? Whatís the difference? Am I totally off on this?

Also, I know tires are a factor, but why? Why does the size of the tires matter? I have heard wider tires and deep treads are better for snow. Should I have these kind of tires year round?  For rainy weather, do I just throw on a rain coat or something similar? Winter, I need my chain in a hub to protect it? Would a fixed gear bike be a better choice for a snowy season? Does that mean I NEED to have two different kinds of bikes? For the brands, all I have heard is Schwinn from the 70ís and 80ís are good and that Raleigh [Rally] bikes are good too? I have been mostly looking at Craiglists for bikes.

Thank you so much for reading my wall of text and all advice is welcome. If you have anymore tips for me, please include them as well.

This confused me a lot: http://biodieselhauling.blogspot.com/2012/01/buying-bikes-from-craigslist.html

och4

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Re: New to Bikes & WTB a 4season Bike
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2013, 10:20:14 AM »
Hello all!
I went to a bike shop yesterday, and I was able to answer some of my question.

Type & Size:
-Hybrid bikes are good for commuting and all seasons.
-Cyclocross bikes are good commuting and all seasons however they are more expensive and they are faster.
-Road bikes go fast, but are not ideal for winter. Ice can be scary.
-Mountain bikes are not ideal for commuting year long, but good for nasty weather.
-I am 5í5 feet tall and 18Ē frame // 46 centimeter was perfect for me.

Tires and weather:
-Tires for hybrids they are usually 700c and they usually go by the measure of width and thickness of tires, 35mm I believe?
-Hybrids, CycloCross, and mountain bikes are good for snow and rain. However mountain bikes are slower and harder on pave paths. You DO NOT need to get two bikes for all season commuting.
-A hub is NOT needed for a snowy season. Just make sure you bring your bike inside so it wonít freeze over the chain or gears.
-Bikes from good bike shops should be decent to great quality. No need to worry.

napalminator

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Re: New to Bikes & WTB a 4season Bike
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2013, 02:56:38 PM »
if you're looking for speed and not off-road abilities, go with a CX bike.  pop slicks on in the summer, knobby CX tires or even studs when the whether turns foul. a CX bike with slicks is basically as fast as a pure road bike in good weather. 

Bakari

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Re: New to Bikes & WTB a 4season Bike
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2013, 06:30:14 PM »
I donít know dick about bikes! However I really want to start commuting to work on a bike through all 4 seasons. I think buying a used bike could be a great experience and a fun one. However I am feeling a bit overwhelmed at all the options. I would like to go fast and still be able to bike in the winter
does it snow where you are?  If not, winter won't change what bike you get. 

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and maybe in the rain as well? Do people bike in the rain?
Yes.  You just need fenders and water proof clothes.  And bright lights, even in the daytime.

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And what about a hot summer morning, this might be a bit nasty to start off the work day. Also, I am clueless about brands and what years I should get a bike from. Could anyone recommend a good guide or help me out with these questions.
Well,  would, but you said it was confusing!

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Because of the speed, I think a hybrid would be good or maybe a Cyclocross?
Road bikes are fastest.

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Road bikes are good for speed, but bad in the winter right?
No, not necessarily.  No bike tire is going to hydroplane, no matter what.  If its a racing bike it may be harder to fit fenders, but a road sport bike will do just fine in wet /cold weather.  If it freezes, you might want to consider studded tires, which work best on a mountain bike. 

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And mountain bikes are good for off-road and winter, but terrible for speed and nice paved roads?

not terrible, if you put fairly thin slick tires on it.

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Which one should I go for then?
unfortunately, no "right" answer to that.

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  For size, what should I go with? I am 5.5 tall and I thought the frame should be 15Ē or that centimeters should 50? Which measure should I go with? Whatís the difference? Am I totally off on this?
road bikes usually use cm, mnt usually use inches.
Although there isn't a universal standard in either one...

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Also, I know tires are a factor, but why? Why does the size of the tires matter?
yes, but not by a huge amount, especially on pavement.  Thinner higher pressure ones will be slightly faster, but with the emphasis on slightly.  Wider ones are slightly more comfortable, as the lower pressure absorbs road vibration

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I have heard wider tires and deep treads are better for snow.
yes, but might not be enough.  Consider studded tires.

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Should I have these kind of tires year round?
no

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  For rainy weather, do I just throw on a rain coat or something similar?
fenders and lights.

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Winter, I need my chain in a hub to protect it?
The hub is the thing in the center of your wheel that the axle goes through.  You can't put a chain in a hub.  You can get a chain guard, but its purpose is to protect your pants leg from chain grease, it won't keep the chain dry. 
There is such a thing as a shaft drive bike, but it is extremely rare, and you should forget I even mentioned it.

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Would a fixed gear bike be a better choice for a snowy season?
no. 

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Does that mean I NEED to have two different kinds of bikes?
no, but it is a good idea.

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For the brands, all I have heard is Schwinn from the 70ís and 80ís are good and that Raleigh [Rally] bikes are good too? I have been mostly looking at Craiglists for bikes.
there are too many good brands to name them all.  More important is just avoid all department store bikes, and then go with the newest thats in your price range.

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Thank you so much for reading my wall of text and all advice is welcome. If you have anymore tips for me, please include them as well.

This confused me a lot: http://biodieselhauling.blogspot.com/2012/01/buying-bikes-from-craigslist.html
Oh NO! 
Which parts?  You are the first person to tell me that.  Be brutally honest in your constructive criticism, and I'll try to fix it.  Its gone up to number one on the Google search for how to buy a used bike, so I want to make sure its actually helping people!
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prodarwin

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Re: New to Bikes & WTB a 4season Bike
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2013, 07:19:19 PM »
Old steel frame MTB from CL + some cyclecross tires is a good cheap setup that is fairly quick and will handle all seasons.  Also handles periodic off-road excursions pretty well.

Here's mine: