Author Topic: Negotiating a raise for an internal promotion - Update and Bad News  (Read 2092 times)

LizzyBee

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 65
I'm being promoted at work from a coordinator to a program manager (it's not official yet). I work in the education field and when I search glass door, the average salary for a program manager in my city is $90,000. The national average is $96,000. I currently make $87,700 and don't supervise anyone. As a program manager, I will supervise 7 people and the scope of my job will increase.

My boss has told me she wants me for the job and is going to quietly post the position, let me apply and then close the position. How should I approach the negotiations? I want to shoot for $95,000, but maybe I could get more? I feel like I have some leverage in that my boss has told me I'm the right person for the job and doesn't want to open the job to anyone else. But, I've also lost some negotiation power because I've already told her I want it. Raises are hard to come by in my department so I don't want to screw this up by not asking for what I deserve. I don't have previous "official" program management experience, although I play this role informally in my current job.

Update:

The position finally got posted today and the salary range is 69,000 to 88,000. I already make 87,700. Are there any HR folks here? Is there any way HR will accept a salary above the highest range listed? I know I can negotiate with my boss, but maybe it is not up to her.

Also, this new job will have so much more responsibility. Can I negotiate based on the fact that I make x amount now and in the new role requires a much larger scope with direct reports so I should be making more or am I just screwed because I already make the top of the range for the new role?

And, how tacky would it be to say that I do not want the role if I do not get a raise? I have two small kids and currently love what I do so there isn't really a reason for me to take this new role other than I really want it and will learn a lot of new skills that could lead to a director position some day. However, taking on so much more stress and responsibility doesn't really appeal to me without a salary increase. 
« Last Edit: February 02, 2016, 03:42:22 PM by LizzyBee »

eyePod

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 966
    • Flipping A Dollar
Re: Negotiating a raise for an internal promotion - Update and Bad News
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2016, 06:43:39 AM »
This is old, but I hope that you're still paying attention. I'm in a similar position, although the job I'm looking at is external from my current position.

The new job would definitely add on some stress of a new job, but the atmosphere that I'm working in isn't the best. I'm looking for a change although my current work isn't bad.

I know the negatives of the new job and am worried that they'll offer the same or similar salary to what I currently get. If it's on the low end, I don't think I'll take it. There's a lot of risk with a new job (and two small kids).

What ended up happening with you?

MidWestLove

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 317
Re: Negotiating a raise for an internal promotion - Update and Bad News
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2016, 09:49:53 AM »
"The position finally got posted today and the salary range is 69,000 to 88,000. I already make 87,700. Are there any HR folks here? Is there any way HR will accept a salary above the highest range listed? I know I can negotiate with my boss, but maybe it is not up to her.
"

not an HR person, however in my experience - all ranges are nothing but 'recommendation' to the hiring manager there is always an override process. whether it is a director in charge of your area, VP, an officer of the company, someone can always sign off on exceeding the range. now, once hired you may be ineligible for case of living adjustments (annual raises) if you are above what HR defines the range for the pay grade/geo area but it is usually made up to you in other means assuming you are employee they want to keep.



Schaefer Light

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1171
Re: Negotiating a raise for an internal promotion - Update and Bad News
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2016, 10:06:44 AM »
I'll just say this.  If I was already making $88k with no direct reports, you'd have to pay me a helluva lot more than $95k to take on 7 direct reports.

mozar

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2955
Re: Negotiating a raise for an internal promotion - Update and Bad News
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2016, 12:44:19 PM »
It's tacky for them to ask you to take on more responsibility without a significant raise. I wouldn't budge for less than 105k.

lbmustache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 930
Re: Negotiating a raise for an internal promotion - Update and Bad News
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2016, 01:10:27 PM »
I'll just say this.  If I was already making $88k with no direct reports, you'd have to pay me a helluva lot more than $95k to take on 7 direct reports.

I agree. I'd ask for $105k or maybe even $110k. If they say that's too high maybe you can negotiate down to $95k but that still sounds kind of low for 7 people to supervise. I don't think there's a problem in telling your boss that you will not take on the added work/responsibility without a significant raise.