Author Topic: Nashbar bike  (Read 10074 times)

GutsGloryRam

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Nashbar bike
« on: March 17, 2014, 01:10:43 PM »
Hi,

I am thinking of buying a hybrid bike. I did some search & found that Nashbar provides a good deal on the bikes. However when I got in touch with the support, i realized that the product shipped is  in dealer ready condition & w'd have to install the wheels, pedals, seatpost, saddle, handlebar, adjust the shifting, brakes, headset, True the wheels etc. I think NO instruction manual & tools are provided. I am new & never tried biking in US.
My questions are:
        -have you tried assembling yourself.
        -what are the tools required.
        -step by step instructions available online?
        -how much it will cost if it has to be done through bike shop (i think many wouldnt recommend this, but if its took much effort & nor much cost, i might think of this option as well)

Thanks & appreciate the info you guys are sharing.....truly badass.....
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 01:15:10 PM by ram »

yyc-phil

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2014, 01:25:09 PM »
I have disassembled bikes, very easy. Assembling everything back is almost as easy as long as you are careful to take notes, which I rarely do but always end up with a few extra pieces...This being said, assembling a new bike is a relatively easy DIY home job, with your regular set of wrenches and Allen keys. A LBS would not charge much for a basic new bike assembly, and probably under $50 if if you only get them to adjust brakes, gears, etc.,. If you live in a fairly large urban area, chances are there is a local non-profit bike shop where you can use the space, tools, and get some assistance for free. And there is a ton of practical information on several good bike-related websites such as http://www.sheldonbrown.com/home.html.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 01:26:50 PM by ykphil »

Thegoblinchief

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2014, 01:33:33 PM »
First off, check out the used market in your area first. Hybrids are sometimes harder to find than MTBs or ten speed road bikes, but that's where the best deals will be found. And zero assembly!

But answering your question, the only thing I've found "hard" to do is adjusting brakes, and it's more annoying than truly challenging. And all bikes will need brake cable adjustment eventually.

Most of the Nashbar bikes are rather well regarded but a few aren't. Make sure to read reviews if you do go that route.

waltworks

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2014, 01:34:30 PM »
Youtube is your friend! If you take the time to put the bike together yourself, you will learn a lot of great stuff that will help you maintain it as well. Plus, if you're posting here, you probably like to geek out and figure out how things work anyway.

Worst case scenario, you get frustrated and have to pay a shop $50-100 to finish the job. Go for it!

-W

GutsGloryRam

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2014, 02:03:49 PM »
Thanks ykphil,Thegoblinchief & waltworks... appreciate your efforts in sharing the views....
can you share which toolset i should buy to start the assembly? link to the products would be great...
Probably i would buy new rather than used, as am new & have no idea how to choose the right bike for the right price. As MMM said, i think its worth buying a new bike as am going to save significantly in gas...I am sure its gonna pay for itself with in few months...

waltworks

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2014, 02:09:40 PM »
Most likely all you will need is a set of allen wrenches, as the bike will probably come with any of the parts that require special tools already installed.

If you are just going to get one tool, I like this one:
http://www.jensonusa.com/!x1KV4nD5FPXdMA5ukZUkZw!/Pedros-ICM-17-Multi-Tool?utm_source=FRGL&utm_medium=organic&gclid=CJeKjLmvmr0CFe87MgodWVYAmQ

That, along with a pump and a spare innertube, will let you fix almost anything that an average bike commuter is going to encounter. If you get into serious road or mountain biking you will end up wanting more specialized tools eventually.

You may want to investigate if there is a community bicycle nonprofit near you. In many cases they will provide a bike for free in exchange for some volunteer time, and will teach you how to work on your bike simultaneously. They are also a good source for used functional bikes in exchange for cash.

-W

Thanks ykphil,Thegoblinchief & waltworks... appreciate your efforts in sharing the views....
can you share which toolset i should buy to start the assembly? link to the products would be great...
Probably i would buy new rather than used, as am new & have no idea how to choose the right bike for the right price. As MMM said, i think its worth buying a new bike as am going to save significantly in gas...I am sure its gonna pay for itself with in few months...

yyc-phil

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2014, 02:18:41 PM »
You could get away with a basic wrench set (mediuml adjustable, and a few flat open wrenches of various sizes, metric or not depending on the bike) and Allen keys from a hardware store for under $20, or something small like a pack of cigarette, like this one for about $20
http://www.amazon.com/Toolbox-Travel-18-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000X5YIPK

If you want to do the whole bike maintenance at home yourself, here is what you would need at minimum, but I don't even have it myself, as I prefer to do the big jobs at the local bike shop and use their tools:

4, 5, and 6mm 3-way hex key.
Shimano ISIS cartridge bottom bracket tool.
Shimano cassette tool to remove a freewheel
Crank extractor with 15mm plug.
Spoke tool
Cable tool.
Chain whip.
1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 10mm hex key kit.
32 and 36mm headset wrenches.
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19mm cone wrenches.
Torx® 25-star wrench.
15mm pedal wrench.
8 and 10mm forged wrenches.
Medium adjustable wrench.
Tire levers.
Cable stretcher
bottom bracket spanner.
A pin spanner
Chain wheel pegs tool.

enigmaT120

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2014, 02:41:41 PM »
I like Nashbar as a company.  I bought one of their bike work stands, and after a couple of years of use a little part broke.  I figured I would just buy a replacement, but when I called their support and told them what I needed, they sent me a whole new clamping section -- way more than the broken part -- for free. 

They also sell took kits. 

Do you know how to guess what size of bike you need, size unseen?


GutsGloryRam

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2014, 03:03:00 PM »
Thanks again waltworks.....I am in Michigan....i am not sure if there is any non profit bike communities....need to do some search on that.....

Thanks ykphil....woww....thats pretty good list...i would probably buy the minimum tools required to assembly & perform small maintenance....ofcourse i appreciate your efforts in sharing your knowledge....thanks...

Thanks enigmaT120...thats nice to hear about Nashbar,since i am planning to buy it from them....i think i know what size...i went to the bike shop & tried couple of bikes to know which size fits me....Infact i was surprised to see very limited options for bikes on store as well.....

« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 03:07:21 PM by ram »

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2014, 10:33:13 AM »
I like Nashbar as a company.  I bought one of their bike work stands, and after a couple of years of use a little part broke.  I figured I would just buy a replacement, but when I called their support and told them what I needed, they sent me a whole new clamping section -- way more than the broken part -- for free. 

They also sell took kits. 

Do you know how to guess what size of bike you need, size unseen?

I'm thinking of purchasing a new bike from Nashbar, the TR1 touring bike.  It's a bit hefty at $850 but it looks perfect for my needs.  Right now I'm tooling around on the bike that I rode in college, and I purchased that one without knowing how to properly fit the bike to me.
I've looked online, and for my size 5'9" with a 32 inseam a 53cm might fit me correctly, I hope.

Any opinions on the TR1 and my sizing estimate?

m8547

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2014, 09:58:56 PM »
You could get away with a basic wrench set (mediuml adjustable, and a few flat open wrenches of various sizes, metric or not depending on the bike) and Allen keys from a hardware store for under $20, or something small like a pack of cigarette, like this one for about $20
http://www.amazon.com/Toolbox-Travel-18-Function-Bicycle-Tool/dp/B000X5YIPK

If you want to do the whole bike maintenance at home yourself, here is what you would need at minimum, but I don't even have it myself, as I prefer to do the big jobs at the local bike shop and use their tools:

4, 5, and 6mm 3-way hex key.
Shimano ISIS cartridge bottom bracket tool.
Shimano cassette tool to remove a freewheel
Crank extractor with 15mm plug.
Spoke tool
Cable tool.
Chain whip.
1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 10mm hex key kit.
32 and 36mm headset wrenches.
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19mm cone wrenches.
Torx® 25-star wrench.
15mm pedal wrench.
8 and 10mm forged wrenches.
Medium adjustable wrench.
Tire levers.
Cable stretcher
bottom bracket spanner.
A pin spanner
Chain wheel pegs tool.

You don't need all those things, even if you want to do 100% of maintenance yourself.
  • 3-way hex key is redundant with hex key kit below. I see no need for it.
  • Bottom bracket and cassette tool will depend on what's on your bike. Buy the correct ones as needed.
  • There are (at least) two crank arm extractor plug sizes. A tool that works for the common ones is good, but at least get one that works for what's on your bike.
  • There are several sizes of spoke nipples. I recommend a Park four sided spoke wrench for the size you have (less likely to round them off).
  • I don't know what a cable tool is? Maybe you mean a cable and housing cutter, but you could use a Dremel tool instead.
  • A chain whip is good to remove the cassette. You could get a combo chain whip/pedal wrench if you don't need a good quality pedal wrench.
  • A good quality hex key set is important. The upper and lower sizes are rarely used though.
  • A bike with a threadless headset won't need headset wrenches.
  • Most bikes only have two sizes of cones, if they have cones at all (a lot of new wheels use cartridge bearings now). You need two of each size that your bike uses. I have two 13mm/15mm combo cone wrenches (I think) and that does all the cones on all my bikes. I also use an adjustable wrench for the lock nuts.
  • Torx is only needed if your bike has it. I believe T25 and T10 are the common sizes, but usually they are only used on disc brakes.
  • A pedal wrench is good to have, but some pedals also have a hex hole in the spindle so it may not be necessary.
  • 8m and 10mm wrenches may not be necessary. I have a socket set and adjustable wrenches and that does everything I need.
  • An adjustable wrench is good to have.
  • I never use tire levers. I can always get tires on/off by moving the bead to the center of the rim.
  • A cable stretcher is not needed, and it's more trouble than it's worth. I can usually set the cable in the pinch bolt in the correct place perfectly on the first try so no barrel adjuster tuning is needed. It's not hard to get close once you get a feel for it.
  • I don't think there is anything on any of my bikes that needs a spanner. Don't buy unless your bike needs it.
  • I'm not sure what you mean by chain wheel pegs tool. Maybe a chainring bolt tool. Those are necessary if you need to take of a chainring, but that's not something I do very often.

I buy bike tools as I need them, so I only have what I need for my bikes. I improvise when I can. I've used an old sock tied to a chain as a makeshift chain whip. I don't recommend it, but it worked. I also tried to make a chain whip on a pedal wrench, but I ruined a couple drill bits before I learned that the steel was too hard to drill.

Some other things that are helpful in general and for building a bike:
-Torque wrenches. Pricy but I use them for everything now. I can be sure fasteners are tight enough but that I'm not going to break anything. You will also need a socket set and a hex bit set to go with them.
-A good bike pump with a pressure gauge. You will need to use this every few weeks, so get one that will last.
-A bike repair stand is extremely helpful to hold the bike. Much better than putting it upside down on the floor (since that doesn't work for all repairs).
-A maintenance book such as Zinn and Art of (mountain/road) bike maintenance, or the Park tool book.


greaper007

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2014, 10:15:23 PM »
Agreed, I buy bike tools as I need them.    You can buy the expensive blue ones, but the cheaper options tend to work just as well for someone that only uses a tool a few times a year.

I also find that for most repairs my automotive/household tools get used more often than bike specific tools.     A set of standard and metric allen wrenches, a ratcheting screwdriver with a large set of bits, combo wrenches and a good set of sockets will probably take you 80% of the way.   As stated above, get a mid-level pump made for bikes before any other bike related tool.

Russ

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2014, 10:46:01 PM »
I'm thinking of purchasing a new bike from Nashbar, the TR1 touring bike.  It's a bit hefty at $850 but it looks perfect for my needs.  Right now I'm tooling around on the bike that I rode in college, and I purchased that one without knowing how to properly fit the bike to me.
I've looked online, and for my size 5'9" with a 32 inseam a 53cm might fit me correctly, I hope.

Any opinions on the TR1 and my sizing estimate?

I think you might be more on the small end of a 56, but it's hard to see through the internet

have someone help you take your measurements and plug them into here, which should spit out some good geo information for you

GuitarStv

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2014, 06:33:32 AM »
I got a TR1 just under two years ago when they had them on sale for 650$.  It's a very nice bike!  I'm 6' with a 33" inseam, and the 58 cm frame fits me well.  It sounds like you have a small torso, so you might prefer the smaller framed 53 cm bike as it has a smaller top tube.  Probably worth trying a few bikes out at local bike stores to check what size feels best, then comparing specs with the ones Nashbar lists online.

A few niggling complaints:
- The rear rack is crappy.  If you try to load anywhere close to the limit on it it will flex and wobble.
- The QR skewers that come with the bike are crappy exposed cam skewers.  Because of this it's hard to tighten the rear wheel enough, and sometimes under heavy pedalling it will shift in the dropout a bit.  Then you have to stop the bike, release the skewer, and push the wheel back into place, then set the skewer again.  If you replace the skewer with an enclosed cam one I got one from my bike store for 5-10$ this problem is largely solved.
- The pedals that came with it were utter garbage.  I tried taking them apart and greasing them but they ended up being replaced after the first ride.

The things I really like about it:
- 105 components are awesome* and make it more fun to ride
- The wheels are pretty sturdy 36 spoked, and have held up great
- The steel frame absorbs bumps and shocks really well
- For a steel frame it's not too heavy
- It's tough.  I've loaded up more than 80 lbs of groceries in panniers on it and it has handled and carried the weight fine.
- Easy to put a front and rear rack on it, easy to put fenders on.
- It was pretty straightforward to put together out of the box (just attach the handlebars, rack, pedals, tighten the stem, and adjust the derailleur/brakes.
- I like the seat.

Stuff that you might want to know:
- This bike has a low bottom bracket.  If you're used to mountain bikes it takes some getting used to.  The low bottom bracket means that the pedals are closer to the ground.  When making a sharp turn and leaning, if you keep the inside pedal down, you will scrape it on the ground.  This is both terrifying and crash inducing.  As long as you move the inside pedal to the top you're fine.  The low bottom bracket means you sit a bit lower on the bike and means that you have a slightly lower center of gravity.  This is not a big deal once you're used to it, but definitely something to be aware of.


* My 105 rear shifter just crapped out a couple weeks ago . . . my local bike shop has said that this is not a very common occurrence with these components, but because I bought the bike from Nashbar I need to return the shifter to them which is a PITA.  (Bike is out of commission for however long this whole procedure will take.)  If I had purchased from my local bike shop they could have done the warranty replacement here and I'd probably be able to ride my bike right now.

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2014, 10:00:57 AM »
Tons of great info, thks guitarstv.
I've put it in my shopping cart; as with all other purchases online I'll leave it there for a month and if it's still desired I'll pull the trigger. Looks like it's up to $750 now.

Russ

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2014, 10:12:56 AM »
if you do end up buying it, keep an eye out for a few months after. If it goes on sale you can usually call them and they'll refund the difference.

Jack

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2014, 12:12:53 PM »
- The pedals that came with it were utter garbage.  I tried taking them apart and greasing them but they ended up being replaced after the first ride.

This is pretty much expected on any expensive (say, $500 and up) bike because the manufacturer assumes you're going to replace them with your choice of clipless pedals anyway.

Half the time bikes in that price range don't come with pedals at all.

JCfire

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2014, 12:32:30 PM »
I recently had a very poor experience with Nashbar.  I ordered a bike from them through Amazon (to make use of an Amazon gift card I had).  They estimated shipping within 4-5 business days.  10 days later, they still had not shipped the bike, and were still estimating 4-5 business days before arrival.  Emails to customer service were not returned.  Soon after, Amazon finally notified me that Nashbar was out of stock on the model I ordered until December 2014.

I ended up going to my local bike store and spending just a bit more for a Specialized Sirrus hybrid bike, fully assembled/fitted/tuned and ready to ride out of the store with a couple of extra attachments and a good relationship with the local bike store thrown in!  The bike is great for my hilly commute -- my only complaint is that I could have been biking at least two weeks earlier had Nashbar either competently managed their inventory or had adequate customer service.

The_Dude

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2014, 04:49:17 PM »
I recently had a very poor experience with Nashbar.  I ordered a bike from them through Amazon (to make use of an Amazon gift card I had).  They estimated shipping within 4-5 business days.  10 days later, they still had not shipped the bike, and were still estimating 4-5 business days before arrival.  Emails to customer service were not returned.  Soon after, Amazon finally notified me that Nashbar was out of stock on the model I ordered until December 2014.

I ended up going to my local bike store and spending just a bit more for a Specialized Sirrus hybrid bike, fully assembled/fitted/tuned and ready to ride out of the store with a couple of extra attachments and a good relationship with the local bike store thrown in!  The bike is great for my hilly commute -- my only complaint is that I could have been biking at least two weeks earlier had Nashbar either competently managed their inventory or had adequate customer service.

It may not be Nashbar's fault.  Earlier this year I tried to order an automotive part through amazon.  It originally said it would take a month to get so I called the manufacturer to see if it was in stock.  They verified that it was.  Long story short, After over two months and a 3rd delay notification I cancelled my order with Amazon.  Amazon's customer service was utterly useless and the Manufacturer said they never received an order from Amazon.  I ordered the part from a different online vendor and it was drop shipped to me a week later...  I'm still pissed over this.

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2014, 08:06:25 AM »

I recently had a very poor experience with Nashbar.  I ordered a bike from them through Amazon (to make use of an Amazon gift card I had).  They estimated shipping within 4-5 business days.  10 days later, they still had not shipped the bike, and were still estimating 4-5 business days before arrival.  Emails to customer service were not returned.  Soon after, Amazon finally notified me that Nashbar was out of stock on the model I ordered until December 2014.

I ended up going to my local bike store and spending just a bit more for a Specialized Sirrus hybrid bike, fully assembled/fitted/tuned and ready to ride out of the store with a couple of extra attachments and a good relationship with the local bike store thrown in!  The bike is great for my hilly commute -- my only complaint is that I could have been biking at least two weeks earlier had Nashbar either competently managed their inventory or had adequate customer service.

Hmm after doing some research I will lean this way. The specialized sirrus is a very nice bike.

Look at the monstrosity to the left! That's mine. I feel as if the majority of my pedaling just squishes the shocks, and the wheels eat up a lot of energy as well.

The sirrus to the right rigged for some panniers will be optimal.

GuitarStv

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Re: Nashbar bike
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2014, 08:16:23 AM »
You might want to check out a Giant Escape or Trek 7.2 FX too.  They're very similar to the specialized sirrus, so you can compare prices if one bike shop happens to offer one brand or the other.  Also more options if you're looking used on craigslist.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2014, 08:20:12 AM by GuitarStv »