Author Topic: My kids' bedrooms are cold.  (Read 6701 times)

secondcor521

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My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« on: February 03, 2018, 12:39:41 PM »
My kids' bedrooms are cold.  When I have the house at 72, their bedrooms are maybe 67, which is too cold.

They are on the main floor of the house but are at the far corners from the gas furnace which is in the garage.  My daughter's bedroom is worse because it is on the back corner of the house.  My son's bedroom is still cold but not as bad; his bedroom is on the front corner of the house.

The insulation certificate from the builder says I have R-38 ceiling, R-13 walls, and R-19 floors.  I know I have blown in fiberglass in the ceiling.  The walls are standard 2x4 construction.  The floors have fiberglass batt insulation between the floor joists.  The foundation has about 4"x12" vents and I have the louvers closed on those now as it is winter.

The ductwork in the crawlspace seems to be in good condition and is wrapped with R-6 insulation.  There is a giant octopus box thing which is roughly in the center of the crawlspace with ductwork runs to the air vents on the perimeter.  The run to the kids' rooms are about 25-30 feet.

Each bedroom has about a 4'x5' window that is double paned but probably of average quality.

They are teenagers so they keep their doors shut all the time.  I know that doesn't help.

I'm looking for something that is effective and fast.  Cheap would be nice but is not a deal breaker.

Things I am considering:

1.  Adding attic insulation up to R-60.  Effective but may take some time to get going.
2.  Putting bubble wrap or plastic sheeting over the windows.  Cheap and fast, but not sure how effective this would be.
3.  Moving my daughter's bed closer to the interior wall instead of the exterior.  Cheap, not particularly effective.
4.  Buying her a space heater of some kind.  Concerned about safety a little bit here.
5.  Hiring someone to come retrofit the walls with insulation - the thing where they drill holes in between each stud and put insulation in through the holes.  I think this would be effective but could be pricey.
6.  Hiring someone to come re-do the duct work so more air gets pushed to their rooms relative to the rest of the house.  Expensive probably and not particularly fast.

Advice?

rockstache

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2018, 12:56:34 PM »
I have this problem but rent, so canít speak to the hiring stuff. Your #2 can be effective if the windows are the problem. In my room, the cold comes straight through the walls, so it only helps a little. What helps on the walls is wall hangings. I also use a corn pack at night - heat in the microwave and snuggle up.


ETA: Removed comment about the temperature in my own room, which is irrelevant.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 11:27:49 AM by rockstache »

Meowmalade

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2018, 12:58:23 PM »
I recently got a DeLonghi HMP1500 Mica Panel Heater and am very happy with it.  It has a tip-over safety mechanism and thermal shutoff.  It claims to be energy-efficient, too.

gaja

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2018, 01:07:19 PM »
67 faherheit is too warm for me to sleep in. The kids are heat crows, so they want around 65F to be comfortable. The living room rarely goes above 64F in the coldest part of winter. Why do you need to increase the temperature?

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2018, 01:08:48 PM »
Electric blankets? My mom uses one when she comes to visit me. I usually keep my thermostat around 62 day/55 night in winter, but it is at 65 this year because I have a new baby. Sometimes when it is really cold and windy out my bedroom gets down to 59 even when the house is set at 65. For the baby I just put a sleep sack over his footie pajamas.  Really slow solution would be to plant trees to shelter the house from the wind. Where I live 67 is shorts and t-shirts weather.

secondcor521

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2018, 05:14:42 PM »
67 faherheit is too warm for me to sleep in. The kids are heat crows, so they want around 65F to be comfortable. The living room rarely goes above 64F in the coldest part of winter. Why do you need to increase the temperature?

My 16 year old daughter is complaining about being too cold.  She rarely complains, so I know it is bothering her.

I forgot to mention, but she does have an electric heating pad on her bed.

I turn the heat down to 68 at night, so her bedroom at night probably gets even colder.  I think she is mostly bothered during the day when she wants to be out of her bed but in her room.

Thanks to all for the suggestions so far.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2018, 05:17:46 PM »
You can get electric ceramic wall panel radiators that are very safe compared to a plug in space heater.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2018, 06:12:17 PM »
If it is a double pane window, more air is leaking around the window than heat transfer through the glass. Window installers, even good ones, are notoriously bad about foaming all around windows. Consider carefully prying off interior trim around the window and spraying foam insulation in. Don't go crazy as if it expands too much it can bow the window. Just try to fill any air gaps with just enough to stop air flow. Then put the trim back on.

Other than that, hang textiles on the exterior walls (pretty quilts?), And get thermal curtains, but honestly I don't know how much they'll help.

We keep our house at 65 all the time, and my son's room runs 5 degrees colder. He has an electric blanket for night. If he complains during the day he gets old to put on more clothes or heat up a rice bag. His room is also 5 degrees cooler in the summer so it evens out.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2018, 06:15:42 PM »
If it is a double pane window, more air is leaking around the window than heat transfer through the glass. Window installers, even good ones, are notoriously bad about foaming all around windows. Consider carefully prying off interior trim around the window and spraying foam insulation in. Don't go crazy as if it expands too much it can bow the window. Just try to fill any air gaps with just enough to stop air flow. Then put the trim back on.

Other than that, hang textiles on the exterior walls (pretty quilts?), And get thermal curtains, but honestly I don't know how much they'll help.

We keep our house at 65 all the time, and my son's room runs 5 degrees colder. He has an electric blanket for night. If he complains during the day he gets old to put on more clothes or heat up a rice bag. His room is also 5 degrees cooler in the summer so it evens out.

This.

My house is 20C during the day (higher during daytime these days due to a bit of solar gain), 17C at night.  I consider this to be somewhat extravagant.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2018, 07:04:13 PM »
Close some of the other vents in the house partially to force more air into their rooms.  Instead of having everything 100% open, set the stuff in the warmer rooms to 70% open, and leave the cold room vents 100% open.

You can also get little booster fans that suck air out of the vents, and that helps with balance as well.

Is it worth putting a return vent over their doors if the doors are regularly closed?  Just a simple through-wall vent over the door to help with return airflow.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2018, 07:06:19 PM »
The temperature you're describing is not unreasonable. OP, tell your teen to put on more clothing. Socks (footies and ankle socks don't count as socks in the winter), long pants, sweater, etc. Have a throw blanket available and use it. Electric/heated blankets are a thing - I have 3. Ensure appropriate bedding for the season (add another blanket). And overall, deal. There's a reason that most parents are constantly telling children to put on more clothes. You need to brush up on that skill, at least until the teen gets a job and contributes to higher heating costs.

For reference - my heat is set to 67 during the day, 62 at night. I run cold. I cover up with a blanket and put on more clothes if I'm cold.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2018, 07:14:13 PM »
I have our house at 68*F at night now only because we have a baby we are trying to keep warm. Otherwise I would have it more like 62*F. I sleep better when it is colder and I am buried under a warm blanket.

Our old rental house had no insulation and insufficient wall heater. I got an electric blanket to put under our down comforter and it was divine. Best $30 I ever spent.

For my oldest in her really cold room we got an oil space heater which kept it in the high 60s. That worked well until she got old enough to figure out how to sleep under a comforter.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2018, 03:53:41 AM »
So it's not night that is a problem, but day?  For night, I can't imagine she's that cold in those temps, especially if she already has an electric mattress pad.  Some thicker PJs and a thicker additional blanket should take care of that.

Does she have good socks and slippers to wear?  If she is cold but walking around barefoot or in thinner clothes, this can be fixed by a rob and wool socks.  If she's not willing to wear those, she's clearly not that cold. 

If she's just sitting in her room studying or on the internet, she can throw a blanket over her lap.  But a microwavable neck pillow filled with beans or grains (easy to make at home!) would work.

For non-bed time, I'd likely hang a quilt or some other very thick fabric time (thicker than even very thick curtains, like a comforter) and make it so that it covers not just the window, but at least 6 inches past the window.  Better still if you can tack it to the wall to better seal it off.  (You can pretty eaily hang a set of ropes from the top so that she can let in natural light by lifting it from the bottom and tying of the cords to hold up the bunched blanket.)

Not as cheap long term, but a radiator-style heater is pretty safe and effective.  But really, I think this is a "child, learn to adapt because this is not at all unreasonable" kind of situation.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2018, 04:01:39 AM »
Agree with others: if the kids are cold in their bedrooms during the day the remedy is for them to spend their time during the day in the parts of the house that are warmer.  If they want the privacy more than the warmth that's up to them, and they need to dress accordingly.

(Yes I did grow up in an unheated bedroom with single pane windows that would grow ice on the inside on cold nights, why do you ask?)

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2018, 04:36:57 AM »
Door open whenever possible is going to help the most. We sometimes close our bedroom to keep toddler and friends out and itís always super cold. I realize they may want privacy which is fine but if they leave to door open all day while they are at school it will be warm and then they can close the door and be mopey teenagers after school. Also sitting still is wicked cold. I freeze in my 70 degree office because I sit still in front of a computer. Moving around helps.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2018, 05:10:16 AM »
67 is fine, and yeah, she just needs to keep the door open and wear two layers of pants.

My bedroom was always 92 on summer days when I was a kid, so I get it, but I don't see a reason to go out of your way to avoid her facing trade-offs here.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2018, 07:45:16 AM »
Since you say furnace (and not boiler) and mention that the doors are closed, I am going to assume forced hot air.

I think you are looking at the wrong, or at least most expensive parts of the equation.

What I would try first is increasing air flow from the supply vent in the bedroom to a return duct (which I am guessing is not in the bedroom).

In our house we actually added a return duct in the master bedroom to combat a similar problem (and to address an overall undersized return pathway). But there are cheaper options; the first is to simply cut a little bit off of the bottom of the door to allow for air to be more easily pushed/pulled under the door. The second is to install a return "jumper duct"; there either connect two rooms via a small duct in the ceiling or straight through a wall with some baffles for sound and light privacy. The third thing I would look at is adjusting your dampers, most ceiling/wall/floor vents will have a damper in them, but I find the most effective ones are pre installed in the duct work; every house I have lived in with forced hot air I had to partially close the dampers in a room or two because it was hotter than the rest of the house. Finally you could look into using a lower fan speed (if available) on your furnace, the fan would run lower and longer, which might allow for more air to flow into and out of the cold bedrooms. 

alanB

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2018, 11:10:53 AM »
Other options I didn't see listed:

-Make one bedroom an office and make the kids share a room.  Problem solved, they will stop complaining about the temperature ;P

-Switch bedrooms with the daughter.  A fun and free change!

-Easy ways to beat feeling cold include: going outside for a few minutes, drinking hot tea, quick bursts of physical activity.  I do not think teens do these things though.

-Run the heat at higher temperature until they move out?  Might still be the cheapest option in the long run.  Probably cheaper than the duct work or the spray insulation at least.

slappy

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2018, 11:43:40 AM »
Can't they just leave the bedroom door open?

cchrissyy

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2018, 12:24:36 PM »
I would close the heater vents to the living areas of the house, therefore letting more of the warm air flow to the bedrooms.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2018, 12:30:49 PM »
What is she wearing?

My husband used to complain I kept the house too cold in the winter; he was wearing t-shirts.

I'm honestly asking if she is dressed appropriately for the season. I'd have her wear thicker socks and a sweater before you start insulating the house more.  67 is not unreasonable in the winter at all. If it was 57; then she has a case!

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2018, 12:39:04 PM »
I find that if I wear my thin socks I feel cold even when the house is a reasonable temperature. Try some thick socks and/or slippers. That may make a big difference in perception.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2018, 05:42:12 PM »
I guess I'm going to be the one person to say: just turn up the damn thermostat! Right now your kids are almost constantly uncomfortable. Yeah, they'll survive, and it's low-grade discomfort, but do you really want your home to be an inhospitable, unpleasant environment for your kids?

Sure, they can wear sweaters, warm pants, long underwear, a couple pairs of socks, a wool hat, mittens, and chug hot tea. And it's reasonable to ask kids to do *some* of that. But 1) for practical reasons, their hands are going to have to be exposed much of the time, and 2) would you really want to bundle up like you're trekking across the Himalayas just to relax at home? I still resent my thermostat-obsessed parents for making it very clear that my comfort was less important to them than saving a few bucks on the utility bill. Is that the kind of parent you want to be?

It might be worth experimenting for a month so you can tell how much money it would cost you to turn the temperature up to, say, 75. If you're not willing to spend the extra few dollars even for a month, then try the space heater. They are really quite cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A78S5B6/ref=s9_acsd_top_hd_bw_b28ik_c_x_2_w?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-4&pf_rd_r=S6JN2Z0BM0NJWJ7FDSHA&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=2bc12524-b902-51fa-90de-56542aa90c4e&pf_rd_i=510182

secondcor521

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2018, 06:44:05 PM »
I guess I'm going to be the one person to say: just turn up the damn thermostat! Right now your kids are almost constantly uncomfortable. Yeah, they'll survive, and it's low-grade discomfort, but do you really want your home to be an inhospitable, unpleasant environment for your kids?

Sure, they can wear sweaters, warm pants, long underwear, a couple pairs of socks, a wool hat, mittens, and chug hot tea. And it's reasonable to ask kids to do *some* of that. But 1) for practical reasons, their hands are going to have to be exposed much of the time, and 2) would you really want to bundle up like you're trekking across the Himalayas just to relax at home? I still resent my thermostat-obsessed parents for making it very clear that my comfort was less important to them than saving a few bucks on the utility bill. Is that the kind of parent you want to be?

It might be worth experimenting for a month so you can tell how much money it would cost you to turn the temperature up to, say, 75. If you're not willing to spend the extra few dollars even for a month, then try the space heater. They are really quite cheap.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A78S5B6/ref=s9_acsd_top_hd_bw_b28ik_c_x_2_w?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-4&pf_rd_r=S6JN2Z0BM0NJWJ7FDSHA&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=2bc12524-b902-51fa-90de-56542aa90c4e&pf_rd_i=510182

I would, except that one of my kids has his bedroom above the garage, and turning the heat up too much makes it too hot for him.  It's a balancing act.

I did go through this thread and compile all of the suggestions into a list that I ran through a K-T decision analysis.  We bought my daughter another quilt for her bed and she's going to let me know if that meets her needs.

As an aside, there are a lot of other things I left out for various reasons.  You've made a lot of assumptions about me and my kids, most of which seem to me to be both negative and unfounded.

Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2018, 07:19:09 PM »
Just chiming in on the bubble wrap: I find it fantastically effective (20F difference on the surface of the glass, but mine is not double pane).  I use the big kind, and turn the bubbles to the glass.

Syonyk

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2018, 07:21:35 PM »
I really think partially closing vents in the hotter sections would help substantially...

We did this when I was growing up - some rooms were at the end of heating runs with 3 exterior sides and were cold.  Balancing the system out helped a lot, and a little booster fan in the cold room helped a lot too.

Lady SA

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2018, 07:24:22 PM »
Can you tell if the lack of heat in those rooms is from heat dispersing because of lack of insulation to the external walls, or if heat isn't getting to those rooms well in the first place? It's likely a combo of both, but one would likely be "primary" if that makes sense.

If the "primary" problem is heat is leaking from their rooms, then it makes sense to build up a bit more insulation buffer to keep the heat trapped. Bubble wrap and/or heat-shrink insulation film over the window can help, plus hanging a quilt over the window and external walls. Are their rooms carpeted? Does there seem to be a specific area of the room that is colder than the rest of the room?

If it seems that the heat isn't really getting into the rooms in the first place, then you'd be looking at your forced-air/heating system and duct work. Is there a way you can reduce the air routing to the rest of the house and force it towards the colder areas to level things out? Can you put a box fan in the hallway to suck warm air from the living area into their rooms? Do you have fans circulating air throughout the house? Adding in extra heating sources could be helpful.

secondcor521

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2018, 08:39:10 PM »
@Lady SA, it's about equal I think.  The window area is about as bad as the walls.

The room is coldest next to the two outside walls.  The supply vent is underneath the window, and it is the wall without the window which is probably slightly worse, but basically equal.

Yes, carpeted floors throughout the majority of the house.

I might level out the vents by closing some in the upstairs bedroom.  There are four supply vents up there.  I think we did that once but were told by some people that closing them off completely and/or to the entire room was a bad idea, but I could partially close them.

I keep the furnace fan on sometimes which helps even things out.  Putting fans in their doorways or hallway is a no-go since they keep their doors shut most of the time.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2018, 09:04:27 PM »
Try adjusting the vents. In my old house the ductwork went in a big loop under the floors.  The first room in the loop would be too hot and the last too cold.  But by closing the first one 3/4, the next couple by 1/2, we could even it out.  Moving your daughter's bed might make more difference than you think.

I have never kept my house above 67 in the winter.  67 does require a fleece sweater if I am just sitting still, but it's winter.  We are supposed to be wearing winter clothes. MMM has a great post about this: the Oil Well You Keep in Your Pants.

rockstache

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2018, 08:12:58 AM »
Does one of your other kids always run cold and be glad to switch to hot garage bedroom?

slappy

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #30 on: February 07, 2018, 08:23:38 AM »
Try adjusting the vents. In my old house the ductwork went in a big loop under the floors.  The first room in the loop would be too hot and the last too cold.  But by closing the first one 3/4, the next couple by 1/2, we could even it out.  Moving your daughter's bed might make more difference than you think.

I have never kept my house above 67 in the winter.  67 does require a fleece sweater if I am just sitting still, but it's winter.  We are supposed to be wearing winter clothes. MMM has a great post about this: the Oil Well You Keep in Your Pants.

I just read that article. Interesting that MMM keeps his house at 67. We keep ours at 64, although we generally run the wood stove to keep it around 68 or 70. I will say on days that we don't run the wood stove because we are out and about most of the day, I freeze at home (at 64). And this is with long underwear/leggings under jeans, socks/slippers, and multiple long sleeve tops (usually long sleeves, light sweatshirt, then heavy sweatshirt). My kids actually seem to prefer it that cool and it certainly doesn't bother my husband, so I just deal with it.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #31 on: February 07, 2018, 08:30:54 AM »
Did I understand the rooms are over crawl-space? I've read that you can "condition" the crawl space (heat it up a bit) or add a layer of thick plastic on the ceiling of the crawl space will improve the temp in your child's room. Also a big thick rug....

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2018, 09:02:21 AM »
I'd start by trying to borrow an infrared camera to see if you can tell where the heat loss is coming from; and measuring the temperature of the air coming into these bedrooms compared to the air coming into more central rooms.  Then you will be able to focus your efforts on the actual problems, rather than guessing.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2018, 09:11:25 AM »
I'd start by trying to borrow an infrared camera to see if you can tell where the heat loss is coming from; and measuring the temperature of the air coming into these bedrooms compared to the air coming into more central rooms.  Then you will be able to focus your efforts on the actual problems, rather than guessing.

A lot of time the electric/gas company will do an energy audit for free.

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2018, 10:57:50 AM »
Since you say furnace (and not boiler) and mention that the doors are closed, I am going to assume forced hot air.

I think you are looking at the wrong, or at least most expensive parts of the equation.

What I would try first is increasing air flow from the supply vent in the bedroom to a return duct (which I am guessing is not in the bedroom).

In our house we actually added a return duct in the master bedroom to combat a similar problem (and to address an overall undersized return pathway). But there are cheaper options; the first is to simply cut a little bit off of the bottom of the door to allow for air to be more easily pushed/pulled under the door. The second is to install a return "jumper duct"; there either connect two rooms via a small duct in the ceiling or straight through a wall with some baffles for sound and light privacy. The third thing I would look at is adjusting your dampers, most ceiling/wall/floor vents will have a damper in them, but I find the most effective ones are pre installed in the duct work; every house I have lived in with forced hot air I had to partially close the dampers in a room or two because it was hotter than the rest of the house. Finally you could look into using a lower fan speed (if available) on your furnace, the fan would run lower and longer, which might allow for more air to flow into and out of the cold bedrooms.
Mostly agree.
I always start with free when possible, then cheap and only if needed go to costly.
Are the rooms cold when the doors are open?   Most certainly if those rooms don't have return ducts.  You will be working 'uphill' if you try to work 'against' this basic design of the house / heating.
Adjust the heating duct dampers - it's a balancing act.
Yes, move the bed away from the exterior wall.
caulk around the windows - you can get non-permanent 'rope' caulk for cheap
foam gaskets for outlets on exterior walls - also cheap
Flannel sheets & PJs
Fleece blankets
Heated mattress pads
Cold weather 'base layer' clothing (modern long johns) - available at WalMart
Warm socks, furry slippers

I use to recommend military surplus wool blankets, but they don't seem to be available any more.
 

GuitarStv

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2018, 11:06:31 AM »
67F is 19C, right?  This is not too cold to be comfortable.  I keep the house at 17 (62F) during the winter and our son year old has had no issues with it since he was two.  I kinda get the feeling that you're trying to wear summer clothing in your house during the winter.  This is a weird thing that has become common because of stores and offices overheating people during winter months.


In the Day, Wear:
- Warm pants
- A T-Shirt
- Warm sweater
- Socks (two pairs if uncomfortable)
- Long underwear (if still feeling cold)

At Night, Wear:
- Warm flannel pajamas
- Warm housecoat
- Warm slippers

On your bed place:
- Several warm blankets
- Flannel sheets

In cases of severe cool temperatures at night use:
- Hot water bottle

I'm a red panda

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2018, 11:40:11 AM »
More thoughts on this.
Have you put a thermometer in your daughter's room?  Is it actually significantly colder than the rest of the house?  Then what the thermostat is on is kind of irrelevant.

If it IS a reasonable temperature to be comfortable in pants and a sweater (winter clothes, not summer ones)- it may seem extreme, but has a recent physical included bloodwork?  When I get anemic I am MUCH colder than when my iron levels are good. There are other things that can make you run significantly cold too.

We do put plastic over our windows in the winter, and add an extra blanket to the bed.  I wear fleece pants and a fleece jacket daily.

Fun story: I had a tenant complain that her son's bedroom was RIDICULOUSLY cold in the winter despite running the heat super high and the upstairs being very warm (he was in a walk-out basement room).  The house was old, so we were a bit worried about how much fixing this was going to cost us...  We had her put a thermometer in the room, and with the heater set on 78, his room was about 45.  We got there, and the window was open.  That was easy to fix!

daverobev

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2018, 09:14:30 PM »
Our bedroom is the coldest in winter, and the warmest in summer. After going "faugh!" too many times, last year I bought a little oil filled radiator, which now sits happily on "1 bar" at about 20 degrees C. It is just enough to supplement the single bloody register in the room...

Actually the other thing I bought first was an in-register cyclone fan thing. It "helps" pull more warm air through the single register, but the furnace has to be on for that to happen.

So yeah. I vote little oil heater. Ours - as I said, on the lowest setting and the dial maybe 1/4-1/3 round for temperature - pulls 400 Watts intermittently.

I reckon it's costing us 2kWh a day. Oh, and you can stick your towel or whatever over it (not covering the vents!) to dry out nicely.

We ALSO have bubblewrap up on 3 out of 4 panes (two windows, two panes in each), which certainly does something.

alanB

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #38 on: February 08, 2018, 08:01:24 AM »
I thought of one more idea - canopy bed. 

https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/diy-cheap-canopy-bed-168372

Either suspend cloth over a 4-post bed or hang rods from the ceiling.  One of the most time-tested ways to stay warm in bed, second to having a raging fire nearby.  Might be too expensive if it is not DIY though.

Reynolds531

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #39 on: February 08, 2018, 08:50:03 AM »
As a true moustachian I have to ask....how much are they paying in rent?

"Get a paper route and I will turn up the heat"

ysette9

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My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2018, 09:00:57 AM »
AlanB: actually I’d say the most time-tested way to stay warm in bed is to share it with another human. I’m pretty sure OP isn’t interested in that particular solution though.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 09:39:42 AM by ysette9 »

Prairie Stash

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2018, 11:29:50 AM »
Look at the bedroom doors, is there a gap under them for air flow? I think the recommendation is to have an inch of space, its also part of the building fire code if I recall correctly.

Often people install carpeting that is too thick and block the air return from a room. For the heat vent to work properly, hot air goes into a room and the air already inside has to go somewhere. I shaved my doors down to meet building code. They come with extra length, to accommodate hardwood floors, laminate, carpet which all adjust the height of the door frame (laminate is thinner than carpet). Not everyone shaves their doors after installing carpet with thick warm underlay.

Yes, carpeted floors throughout the majority of the house.
It fixed my kids bedroom, exact same problem.

partgypsy

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #42 on: February 08, 2018, 11:41:48 AM »
I'm surprised there is such a temperature differential, when on same floor of house...

Ditto measure what the actual temp is in the rooms. If there is a significant difference might we worth a service call.

Our heat was out for 2 weeks in December. I got a space heater and put it wherever we were hanging out in evening, an electric blanket for the bed and me and the youngest shared the bed, and oldest would use rice packs or water bottles at night. When at home we all wear slippers.

It was something like this. Should make your daughter totally happy.
 
https://www.costco.com/Lasko-ELITE-Collection-Ceramic-Tower-Heater-with-Remote-Control.product.100300016.html

Chadbert

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Re: My kids' bedrooms are cold.
« Reply #43 on: February 08, 2018, 06:48:49 PM »
We bought the house DW grew up in, she complained that her old room was always cold, even had her blanket freeze to the outside wall on occasion.
I cut about 1” off the bottom of all the bedroom doors, insulated the house (house was built in 1964), replaced the single pane windows and in that room, I took off the outlet covers and caulked all the holes inside the box, could feel cold air coming through and then took all the trim off the outside walls and caulked where the floor and walls meet.  That room is currently not used much, and is chillier than the rest of the house since we leave the door closed, but no more frost on the walls.
If I want the room warm, I prop the door open for a couple of hours and it warms right up.
Air flow is key, I echo the recommendation to leave the doors open when the kids aren’t at home, they will notice a difference.


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