Author Topic: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?  (Read 9856 times)

WhoopWhoop

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Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« on: September 06, 2014, 08:04:51 PM »
I'm interested in trying MMA or boxing. Any sort of fighting will do.

I want to start slow.

There are a lot of different kinds of gyms near me. There are probably 3 MMA/jui jitsu gyms in my suburban city alone.

From what I can tell, training and classes are expensive. More expensive than the ~$15/mo normal gym membership I used to have.

My strategy:
  • Get free guest passes to the local gyms. Try one gym or class a week.
  • When I've exhausted the free guest passes, look on Yipit for one month unlimited classes at gyms close enough to ride my bike to. Since I can't control which gyms will have deals, I won't have focused training. One month I could be doing jui jitsu, and the next month boxing. In order to truly take advantage of these deals, I'll go to the classes nearly every weekday, and then when the deal is over, take a little break before purchasing the next Yipit deal. From what I can tell, these "deals" will cost anywhere from $25-$40 for a month's worth of training.
  • I don't have any further plans past that. Maybe start a free fight club with low level sparing practice? Who knows.

Anyone have experience with trying to find inexpensive fight training? Anyone have a better plan than the one I outlined above? I'm open to suggestions.

(Btw, I don't have any specific goals I want to accomplish. I just want to try this stuff.)
« Last Edit: September 06, 2014, 08:33:57 PM by WhoopWhoop »

TomTX

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2014, 08:53:55 PM »
The only cheap way I am aware of to learn martial arts, is to find and join a club rather than going to a commercial business.

Or chuck it all and join a kung fu monastery ;)

RFAAOATB

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2014, 10:21:32 AM »
Judo is typically less expensive and more club like than jiu jitsu.

Judo tournaments are available and relatively affordable.

If you want to compete in MMA, then you will need a add striking component such as boxing or Muay Thai or pay up for a MMA gym, but if you want to keep this recreational and are ok with limiting competition to judo tournaments, then stick with judo.

serious_pete

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2014, 11:06:17 AM »
I'd second that. In the uk most mma gyms are run as businesses with pricey monthly subscriptions. For some reason judo clubs are run by volunteers at local community centres, even when they are coached by former british champions and Olympians, and subsequently are about half the price.

East River Guide

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2014, 11:35:46 AM »
Any sort of fighting will do.


I'm pretty sure you can start bar fights for free ;-)

You post-fight expenses might be a bit unpredictable though.

LAWson

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2014, 02:13:51 PM »
What's your goal? If you're looking to compete or get good sparring, you have no choice but to join a gym (or a fight club). Otherwise, buy a punching bag and train yourself outdoors. The physical part is all running, jump-roping, plyo, and core. In most boxing classes, you're just paying someone to motivate you, show you technique, and the equipment, which isn't expensive. Good boxing/MMA gyms in my area are quite expensive (close to $100/month). Pedestal punching bags are like $200, boxing gloves + hand wraps are maybe $30-$40.

WhoopWhoop

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2014, 02:32:49 PM »
Thanks guys. I looked up Judo clubs and have come across one possibility already. They don't list prices on their website, so I'll look into it.

This reminded me that there's a lot of cultural diversity where I live so there will probably be a lot of various forms of martial arts offered at cultural centers. The trick will be in finding them, though, as I imagine they are not as heavily advertised as commercial gyms.

I would like to learn some striking, but I'm in no hurry.

What's your goal? If you're looking to compete or get good sparring, you have no choice but to join a gym (or a fight club). Otherwise, buy a punching bag and train yourself outdoors. The physical part is all running, jump-roping, plyo, and core. In most boxing classes, you're just paying someone to motivate you, show you technique, and the equipment, which isn't expensive. Good boxing/MMA gyms in my area are quite expensive (close to $100/month). Pedestal punching bags are like $200, boxing gloves + hand wraps are maybe $30-$40.

I've looked up people who have trained themselves and apparently they have bad technique and learn terrible habits. I don't want to do that. I'm starting from scratch here.

GuitarStv

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Re: Inexpensive boxing/MMA training?
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2014, 06:29:41 AM »
Martial arts are something I've spend a lot of time in my life doing . . . 1 year Aikido, 5 years WTF Taekwondo, 3 years Muay Thai, 2 years Judo, 5 years Brazilian Jiu Jitsu . . . some boxing and wrestling mixed in there at various points too.

Good training places for martial arts are more expensive than big box gyms.  Big box gyms can pay trainers just about nothing because they don't care about the qualifications of their staff.  The skills and dedication of the staff at a martial arts place will determine how good the training you get is.  Around here, about 100 - 150$ a month is a decent price for one.  There is no alternative.  IT IS NOT POSSIBLE to learn to fight by yourself.  If you try, you will develop bad habits that will set you further back than people who are brand new to the sport.  I've taught some classes, and have seen some horrific bad habits caused by self-training.  Without a partner and someone to correct your bad technique you will be wasting your time.

I'm glad that you seem to be interested in focusing on one particular aspect of martial arts rather than trying to combine things right from the start.  My experience has been that having a strong base in something really helps you develop better and will be less confusing than trying to learn multiple unrelated things all at once.  You don't want to be a jack of all trades - master of none.

Judo clubs are typically cheaper.  Many are run at cost or very close to it.  Typically the instruction is done by someone who knows what he's doing . . . and judo clubs are competitive environments which is vital in developing technique that works.  If you can't perform your technique against a resisting opponent, your technique is useless.  While I love judo, it doesn't train you for MMA competition.  Especially after the BS Kodokan rule changes that came into play a few years back (DQ in competition for touching below uke's belt on attack).  In judo you will not get experienced sprawling, defending single/double leg takedowns, you will get minimal and only very basic groundwork and your classes will very heavily emphasize grip stuff that's just not important in MMA (no jacket to grip).

You fight the way that you train.  The latest set of rules for competition Judo have really hurt the martial art . . . many traditional techniques are now not allowed (Kata-guruma, Morote-gari, Kuchiki-taoshi, Sukui Nage, Kibisu-gaeshi, etc.) in an attempt to make competition judo look prettier.  Because of this, it's common for judo clubs to avoid training these techniques.

That said, some judo clubs are good for MMA training . . . I've been to a club that did Kosen judo where they do a no gi (effectively wrestling) days every now and then, and where they spend more time focusing on groundwork.  It was very similar to BJJ training.  If you can find a decent instructor who teaches and allows older techniques in sparring rather than focusing on what's currently allowed in tournaments you will learn more useful throws as well and will develop some experience sprawling.  In all honesty though, you would be much better served grappling for MMA with a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu place . . . as they will be set up to focus on all this stuff by default.  Straight up wrestling would be better for you than judo for throws because of the reduced focus on gripping the gi to execute your technique.  I like gi work quite a bit, but if your goal is to fight without it, you need to train for that goal.