Author Topic: Mustachian Birth Control  (Read 15869 times)

lackofstache

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Mustachian Birth Control
« on: October 24, 2013, 01:09:10 PM »
It's obviously a very personal choice to have children, it's also a choice not to (or stop).

Does it make financial sense to shell out ~$1,000 to prevent a(nother) baby while still paying down debt?

What's the most mustachian form of birth control?

Your thoughts are appreciated.

mrsggrowsveg

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2013, 01:14:36 PM »
This is such a personal choice.  For my family (and I think this would be Mustachian approved) we use the fertility awareness method.  No hormones, no surgeries no side effects and 99.5% accurate when used effectively.  I read the book "Taking Charge of Your Fertility" that I got at the library.  This involves monitoring your cervical position, cervical mucus and taking your temperature.  We use condoms during the fertile period around ovulation.  This was hard at first, but now I just keep a calender and thermometer by my bed and it is really very easy.  Good luck with this decision!

Cromacster

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2013, 01:16:17 PM »
I suppose as they say in high school.  The only guaranteed method is through abstinence......but mustachianism is also about enjoying life so screw that (hehe).

If you have health insurance aren't birth control pills free or relatively cheap?  I'm not sure about other methods.

Condoms are relatively cheap as well.

Spork

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2013, 01:16:38 PM »
It's obviously a very personal choice to have children, it's also a choice not to (or stop).

Does it make financial sense to shell out ~$1,000 to prevent a(nother) baby while still paying down debt?

What's the most mustachian form of birth control?

Your thoughts are appreciated.

For me it was a vasectomy.  Back in the days before HMO/PPO/co-pays, etc -- back when my health insurance was "80% insurance company/20% patient", the worst insurance company I've ever dealt with paid 100%. 

smalllife

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2013, 01:18:12 PM »
The ACA made practically all forms of birth control no-cost to the patient if they have health insurance.  Why do you think it would cost you $1000?


dadof4

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2013, 01:23:44 PM »
Birth control is cheaper than having kids, if that is what you are asking :)

Under Obamacare, contraception is supposed to be fully covered without co-pay (read free). You can also check with your healthcare provider, as vasectomies and IUD's might also be free or close to that.


lackofstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2013, 01:24:05 PM »
I wasn't aware of that provision of the ACA and apparently haven't done my research terribly well. The ol' V it is, if it's free. After my wife went through some cancer & surgeries & subsequent constant irregularities in hormones, we're not gonna touch pills or other body altering things on her side. We've done okay for the past 3.5 years, but as we get on track with a more mustachian lifestyle I'm more inclined to do something more permanent...

Rural

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2013, 01:32:54 PM »
Menopause fixes it every time. :-)

I the meantime, of course, something else is advisable, and the ACA provisions are well worth looking into.

MrsPete

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2013, 01:33:00 PM »
Whether it makes sense to have a child (or another child) purposefully while paying down debt is a question that requires some definition: 

If you are still carrying a reasonable mortgage and perhaps a car payment, but you're meeting all your financial obligations and are squirreling away money every month, yes, you should be able to shoulder the financial cost of having a child.  In fact, waiting could be a big mistake:  Fertility does decrease with age. 

On the other hand, if your situation is less rosy -- if, perhaps you're struggling to pay your current debts, and you aren't saving or aren't saving enough -- then you'd be foolish to take on more financial responsibilities before your financial house is in better order, even if that does lead to problems down the road.

I'm not clear on the $1000 figure.  Is that the estimate for the birth?  Considering medical expenses, baby items, and other necessary costs, it's a lowball estimate even for the first year of the child's life. 

As for the least expensive birth control option, the answer is clear:  The one that you'll actually use on a consistent basis!  The  most expensive birth control is still cheaper than raising a child.  This is one of those things upon which you should not scrimp.  Use whatever seems easiest to you and hang the cost. 

Rural

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2013, 01:34:35 PM »
As for the least expensive birth control option, the answer is clear:  The one that you'll actually use on a consistent basis!  The  most expensive birth control is still cheaper than raising a child.  This is one of those things upon which you should not scrimp.  Use whatever seems easiest to you and hang the cost.

On further reading, what she said.

mod edit: fixed quote tags
« Last Edit: October 26, 2013, 11:25:55 AM by Russ »

lackofstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2013, 01:35:22 PM »
An UPDATE! Vasectomy's are a covered surgical operation, however, they are subject to deductible & out of pocket expense, at least through my provider. The ACA's provision is worded for WOMEN. This may change with revisions to the ACA, but it's the case currently. So, yeah ~$1,000. I've received a couple quotes that are in that range.

ScienceSexSavings

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2013, 02:00:05 PM »
Vasectomies are still well worth it! If she's up for it, she could get her tubes done instead, since it's a women's thing ;) Modern IUDs are great as well, and although they have a high upfront cost, they last for years. Copper coil ones are hormone-free, although they often come with heavier and more painful periods.

Psychstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2013, 02:03:26 PM »
If you are 100% done with having kids, then yes, here's a grand, snip snip, bag of ice on the couch for a weekend and back to work on Monday.

If you are less than 100%, look to a less permanent solution. Reversals are major surgery, expensive, and not guaranteed to be successful.

Another fun note, you might want to check to make sure that you are still shooting blanks from time to time. Spontaneous reversals occur around 1% of cases.

Fun note #2, listen to your doctor. I had a friend get a vasectomy, but his wife got pregnant in the in between time when your system is clearing out the final deposits, so maybe grab a box of condoms on the way out if your are not okay with the wait time.

Nudelkopf

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2013, 11:33:20 PM »
$1/week on the pill.

Actually, I'm single at the moment, so it ought to be $0/week... But I'm keeping my options open ;)

dorkus619

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2013, 09:53:50 AM »
I haven't paid for my BC in several months. I used by pay like $10/month but then one day I went to pick it up and they said it was free now.

So I'm staying baby free for free.

Kazimieras

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #15 on: October 25, 2013, 10:05:40 AM »
Here are some options that I want to make sure you're aware of for birth control that, due to cultural reasons, don't tend to be that popular in North America (although they are widely used in the rest of the world).

The first question you need to ask is do you ever want kids? If it is a no, vasectomy for the guy works. On the female side of things you can get your tubes tied as well. In both cases of cutting and tying things they are fairly effective, but there are more effective methods out there. A friend recently had an "Essure" implanted. It is a metal coil that basically blocks the Fallopian tubes. Statistically it is more effective than any other method out there and it is VERY permanent. So don't get it unless you never want kids.

The best practical method for birth control (not STI prevention) is the IUD (intrauterine device). These have advanced significantly since the days of old (70s), when they were less than perfect. Now there are two options in this category. One is a copper IUD. It works well, can be implanted and removed easily and is fairly inexpensive. The downside is that with some women you will bleed more heavily due to how it works. The other option (and personal fav) is Mirena. It is a chemically tipped plastic IUD. This worked well for my wife since the hormones act locally only (uterus), and do not go elsewhere in the body causing many of the side effects that are common with the pill, depo, etc. Like its copper sister it is easily implanted and removed but also has the advantage of preventing or heavily reducing bleeding (this is great if you suffer from anemia). In both cases once the IUD is removed, fertility is restored instantly (the pill can take upwards of a year to fully purge its effects from the body). Both IUD types have a lifespan of "5 years" (although there is a 3 year Mirena as well), although they don't immediately lose effectiveness the day they expire, but slowly decrease afterwards. Both of these will cost a bit up front, typically around 1 year of birth control pills.

Anyways, some food for thought.

lackofstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2013, 11:47:34 AM »
Thanks for all the thoughts, we're now weighing whether we should pay $1,000 for the V for me or a free IUD for her. We'll weigh cost against risks, but the Mustache in me is leaning towards free... Though, I'm willing if the idea doesn't strike my wife as the best.

Debbie M

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2013, 12:15:50 PM »
Vasectomies are much, much less invasive than having one's tubes tied.  That's the case even if the woman hasn't already had cancer, surgeries, and hormonal irregularities.

ThatGirl

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2013, 12:24:33 PM »
Vasectomies are much, much less invasive than having one's tubes tied.  That's the case even if the woman hasn't already had cancer, surgeries, and hormonal irregularities.

This is what my doctor said to me when we discussed permanent birth control. I was also told that a vasectomy is more effective, provided that the man completes the follow-up test to make sure he's "shooting blanks."

Regarding the IUD, it may be an easy insertion for the care provider, but it's definitely not easy for the patient. Some doctors still hesitate to recommend it to women who haven't given birth because it can definitely be painful. I have the Mirena (love it! I rarely menstruate now, which is a perk), am childfree, & I experienced basic period-like cramping after insertion. Out of my 3 friends who have also had the Mirena inserted, none of them were able to return to work the same day & all experienced significant pain for up to 1 week. All of us love our IUDs (I feel weird knowing this, & I'm not sure why...), but it's worth taking into consideration as well as the free coverage.

Spork

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2013, 12:54:14 PM »
Vasectomies are much, much less invasive than having one's tubes tied.  That's the case even if the woman hasn't already had cancer, surgeries, and hormonal irregularities.

This is what my doctor said to me when we discussed permanent birth control. I was also told that a vasectomy is more effective, provided that the man completes the follow-up test to make sure he's "shooting blanks."


I'd also point out to the squeamish: They are so not a big deal.  I know it sounds like a big deal.  It isn't.  Mine was 5 minutes start to finish (and that included doctor shaking my hand, making small talk, washing his hands, etc.).   A little discomfort the next day -- basically, just "keep still and you're fine."

ThatGirl

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2013, 01:27:30 PM »
@Maigahane, that's why I didn't choose the Paragard! I already had nasty cramps, so the idea of having super long periods with possibly more bleeding than usual really turned me off.

I know I've turned this into the IUD thread (sorry!), but two last points. There is an adjustment period for both partners after insertion, & there might be costs down the road if the IUD moves. At one point, I needed an ultrasound to make sure my IUD hadn't pierced my uterus, but thankfully the procedure was covered by my insurance & I was ok.

Not sure if you can tell, but I've got all my ducks in a row to convince my husband to get a vasectomy so I don't have to get another IUD inserted. :) It's about time he took care of the BC in our relationship!

Zora

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #21 on: October 25, 2013, 01:31:06 PM »
Slight TMI warning for the dudes out there.

Just thought I'd throw in my experience with the IUD.  I had the Mirena for about a year, the copper IUD for about 5.  I don't remember what I paid out of pocket but it was covered by insurance like any other medical expense.  Initially I was excited about both because there's no ongoing cost and because I was TERRIBLE at remembering to take my birth control pills. 

I am now IUD-less while trying (unsuccessfully) to conceive, and I don't think I would do it again.  The insertion was somewhat painful but I don't think should throw anyone off.  The downside that I found was that it made sex somewhat uncomfortable.... not every time all the time, but maybe a little bit most of the time.  Because it was just a little bit of irritation (like slight pain at certain angles), I didn't even think about it too much until I noticed how much better it was to have it gone. 

And now I can't help but wonder whether all those years have had some as-yet-undiagnosed problem that is now preventing me from conceiving (we are seeing infertility doctors now but testing is not complete).

Just an anecdote, I know.  And I don't know that there's a better non-permanent solution.

lackofstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2013, 01:51:22 PM »
It's a permanent thing & I think I'd rather spend the money and deal with discomfort this go 'round than have her be uncomfortable and possibly not enjoy sex as much. She birthed our kids after all.

simonsez

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2013, 01:53:17 PM »
Coitus interruptus. YMMV.

lackofstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #24 on: October 25, 2013, 01:57:59 PM »
Coitus interruptus. YMMV.

My mileage does in fact vary.

simonsez

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #25 on: October 25, 2013, 02:02:51 PM »
Indeed.

Loved the line from the article -

"It’s also important to realize that many guys cannot tell exactly when they are going to ejaculate"

« Last Edit: October 25, 2013, 02:25:41 PM by simonsez »

iamlindoro

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #26 on: October 25, 2013, 02:17:00 PM »
Aaaaaaand file this under the heading "stuff I never figured I'd post on MMM":

http://sexetc.org/info-center/post/sperm-and-pre-cum-what-you-need-to-know/

mlipps

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #27 on: October 25, 2013, 03:07:14 PM »
Vasectomies are still well worth it! If she's up for it, she could get her tubes done instead, since it's a women's thing ;) Modern IUDs are great as well, and although they have a high upfront cost, they last for years. Copper coil ones are hormone-free, although they often come with heavier and more painful periods.

I love my IUD but I have to get an ultrasound every year to check it & those are not cheap. My deductible is $400 and my gyno visit this year cost about $300. Ugh.

Spork

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #28 on: October 25, 2013, 06:27:05 PM »
My wife is also very quick to point out the pill is something like 99.9% accurate.  She's a 0.1%'er -- totally unexpected and well after her parents were not expecting to have any more kids.   ...but I'm sorta glad they did.

Tempe

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #29 on: October 25, 2013, 11:24:58 PM »
My wife is also very quick to point out the pill is something like 99.9% accurate.  She's a 0.1%'er -- totally unexpected and well after her parents were not expecting to have any more kids.   ...but I'm sorta glad they did.
I had a classmate who was conceived while her parents were using a condom and her father had had a vasectomy. He had one of those spontaneous reversals so she was completely unexpected.

N

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #30 on: October 25, 2013, 11:42:35 PM »
if you are going to deal with the deductible, etc. then you may want to consider doing it in the early part of the year, in case you need anything else during the year, you've already paid it (or some of it) or alternatively, if you are waiting, and then for some reason have other medical needs and meet your deductible, get the V then. maximize your deductible usage.

Freckles

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #31 on: October 26, 2013, 12:22:05 AM »
mlipps, do you live in the US?  I've never heard of anyone having to get an ultrasound each year with an IUD.  I've had mine for three years now and haven't had an ultrasound, or one recommended.  From what I was told, it's good in there for 10 years and I don't have to do anything until then.  (I have ParaGard; Mirena has an earlier expiration.)

Lackofstache, I can't predict how it will affect your wife but it's not supposed to cause any discomfort during sex.  I can't feel mine at all and haven't had any discomfort during intercourse.  I did have the discomfort they warn about- cramping and heavier bleeding.  If your wife does decide to try an IUD, I'd recommend Mirena over ParaGard.  Not that I've had Mirena, so I guess I can't say for sure, but I wish I'd chosen Mirena.  ParaGard is fine for me now, but it really made for uncomfortable periods for pretty much the first year.  I thought avoiding hormones might be a good idea so I went with the copper rather than the plastic + hormones, but it really kind of sucked. 
« Last Edit: October 26, 2013, 10:15:30 AM by Freckles »

Peony

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #32 on: October 26, 2013, 01:13:14 AM »
Another IUD fan here. Mine is non-hormonal and has caused me no problems, and has been doing its job for about 10 years (time to have it removed, actually). Excellent return on the initial $300 investment! Menstruation a little heavier/longer but not uncomfortable in my case. Never heard of the ultrasound thing.

Rebecca Stapler

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #33 on: October 26, 2013, 06:45:54 AM »
It's a permanent thing & I think I'd rather spend the money and deal with discomfort this go 'round than have her be uncomfortable and possibly not enjoy sex as much. She birthed our kids after all.

You are very thoughtful! I contemplated an IUD because we're not done yet, but the side effects include painful cramping and I already have monthly cramps that wake me up at night they're so bad. So, I crossed IUD off of my list.

When we're done, MH will get the snip snip. It's a week of discomfort max, versus monthly discomfort for me with an IUD.

Ree

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #34 on: October 26, 2013, 06:55:06 AM »
There is also a hormonal birth control that is just a little rod that get inserted in the arm between the bicep and tricep. It lasts for three years. Good choice for the IUD squeamish or those that get heavy cramps. The most recent version is called Nexplanon. 99% effectiveness with no danger of forgetting a pill.

ScienceSexSavings

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2013, 10:24:22 AM »
I think they wanted to avoid a lot of hormones, though.

I've never heard of ultrasounds for IUDs - my strings get checked annually with other lady-maintenance and that's that. Cramping does happen occasionally, and there is the possibility of discomfort during sex. If the strings are trimmed nice and short, sex shouldn't affect it unless the cervix is getting stabbed, which is probably pretty uncomfortable anyway!

mlipps

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #36 on: October 26, 2013, 10:43:03 AM »
mlipps, do you live in the US?  I've never heard of anyone having to get an ultrasound each year with an IUD.  I've had mine for three years now and haven't had an ultrasound, or one recommended.  From what I was told, it's good in there for 10 years and I don't have to do anything until then.  (I have ParaGard; Mirena has an earlier expiration.)


Yeah I do, that's weird. I really like my gyno though so it's not the end of the world. It's a vaginal ultrasound if that makes it make any more sense...I've never been pregnant so maybe that's part of it? I know it's unusual for women who haven't conceived to have an IUD & that it makes it slightly more risky. At any rate, I do love my Mirena, although sometimes when I 20% want a kid, I wish I could just skip a few pills and see what happens haha. It's a very all or nothing decision, which is a little intimidating as we contemplate when we want to have kids.

Koala0924

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2013, 01:11:42 PM »
Just adding to the Mirena love. I'm currently on my 3rd one, with no problems to date. My latest one, inserted just 2 months ago, was the first one by my "new" ob/gyn. She did require a vaginal ultrasound to check placement (to ensure the IUD was settled and there was minimal chance of my uterus being perforated I think). My previous ob/ gyn did not ask for an ultrasound. Also, insertion and the ultrasound were covered 100% by my insurance. No copay or deductible $ needed.

Insertion of the Mirena is not pleasant, at all. However, it is bearable and, for me, totally worth it. A couple of minutes of pain followed by 1-3 days of cramping and uncomfortableness for up to 5 years of virtually worry free near 100% effectiveness at preventing babies is a trade I will take. I'm child free, and have never been pregnant. My understanding is that insertion is much easier for women who have carried a child to term.

ThatGirl

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2013, 01:12:37 PM »
The yearly ultrasound is a little suspicious. I was having some unexplained cramping & pain, so my doctor scheduled an ultrasound to make sure my IUD hadn't moved. That was once & I've had it for almost 4 years. It's worth bringing it up with your GP so you can avoid unneccessary costs & discomfort.

Daleth

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2013, 01:28:38 PM »
It's obviously a very personal choice to have children, it's also a choice not to (or stop).

Does it make financial sense to shell out ~$1,000 to prevent a(nother) baby while still paying down debt?

What's the most mustachian form of birth control?

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Most forms of birth control will be free under Obamacare starting January 1, 2014. Can you wait until then?

Spork

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #40 on: October 27, 2013, 06:35:49 AM »
My wife is also very quick to point out the pill is something like 99.9% accurate.  She's a 0.1%'er -- totally unexpected and well after her parents were not expecting to have any more kids.   ...but I'm sorta glad they did.
I had a classmate who was conceived while her parents were using a condom and her father had had a vasectomy. He had one of those spontaneous reversals so she was completely unexpected.

It happens.   An acquaintance in college had TWO siblings that were post vasectomy.  I.e: V1 -> had a kid; v2 -> had another kid; v3 -> done

Tami1982

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #41 on: October 27, 2013, 12:11:09 PM »
It happens.   An acquaintance in college had TWO siblings that were post vasectomy.  I.e: V1 -> had a kid; v2 -> had another kid; v3 -> done

Yep.  A male friend of mine had a vasectomy at 18 because he knew he didn't want kids.  And then his girlfriend got pregnant.  I guess the tubes had grown back together.  She got an abortion and he went in again.  5 years later he's married to someone else and all of a sudden she turns up pregnant.  Again with the abortion, she got her tubes tied and they went in again on him for the 3rd time and folded the ends of his tubes up and used metal clamps:(  I don't think any form is "set it and forget it."  Periodically get that stuff checked so you don't ever end up having to make difficult choices.

TrulyStashin

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2013, 09:20:39 AM »
I'd raise holy hell with your insurance company over their failure to cover the V with no-copay.  http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2012/February/27/five-questions-health-law-mandate-birth-control.aspx?p=1

1) the language in the federal rule is unclear and insurance companies are not prohibited from covering vasectomies with no copay.
2) by treating men and women differently, they open themselves up to lawsuits and bad PR.

The squeaky wheel gets the grease.   Years ago, when my medical insurance refused coverage for my daughter's dental implants as part of reconstructive surgery, I fought for almost a year and appealed it up every possible avenue.  End result -- I paid the $50 copay and they covered the rest.

Don't take "no" for an answer on this one.

lackofstache

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #43 on: October 30, 2013, 08:49:27 AM »
I'd raise holy hell with your insurance company over their failure to cover the V with no-copay.  http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2012/February/27/five-questions-health-law-mandate-birth-control.aspx?p=1

1) the language in the federal rule is unclear and insurance companies are not prohibited from covering vasectomies with no copay.
2) by treating men and women differently, they open themselves up to lawsuits and bad PR.

The squeaky wheel gets the grease.   Years ago, when my medical insurance refused coverage for my daughter's dental implants as part of reconstructive surgery, I fought for almost a year and appealed it up every possible avenue.  End result -- I paid the $50 copay and they covered the rest.

Don't take "no" for an answer on this one.

I'm gonna give them a call and push it a bit today. It bothered me, but your comments really got me thinking. There is NO reason they shouldn't treat this the same way as if I were a female. It's birth control for our family either way...

Spork

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #44 on: October 30, 2013, 12:56:39 PM »
I'd raise holy hell with your insurance company over their failure to cover the V with no-copay.  http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2012/February/27/five-questions-health-law-mandate-birth-control.aspx?p=1

1) the language in the federal rule is unclear and insurance companies are not prohibited from covering vasectomies with no copay.
2) by treating men and women differently, they open themselves up to lawsuits and bad PR.

The squeaky wheel gets the grease.   Years ago, when my medical insurance refused coverage for my daughter's dental implants as part of reconstructive surgery, I fought for almost a year and appealed it up every possible avenue.  End result -- I paid the $50 copay and they covered the rest.

Don't take "no" for an answer on this one.

I'm gonna give them a call and push it a bit today. It bothered me, but your comments really got me thinking. There is NO reason they shouldn't treat this the same way as if I were a female. It's birth control for our family either way...

And the procedure itself is way easier/cheaper than the female alternative for god sakes.   Maybe you can pull the old "would you rather pay X for a vasectomy or 3X for a tubal."  (I don't actually know that it's 3X... but I bet it's at least 2X.)

brycedoula

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #45 on: October 30, 2013, 02:03:49 PM »
Throwing in my two cents: I'm a G0P0 (meaning never been pregnant, never birthed a baby). I chose to have a non-hormonal IUD inserted 2 years ago. I have the NovaT IUD, which is a slightly smaller copper-T (my GP gave me the smaller one as I've never been pregnant/delivered a baby). On insertion it hurt about as much as a bad period cramp, for like 3 minutes only. Probably wouldn't have hurt at all if I'd remembered to take ibuprofen or naproxen ahead of time. I am one of the lucky woman who DIDN'T have heavier periods or cramping for subsequent periods.

I live in Canada, so the only cost I had to cover was the $140 for the IUD itself; my health coverage thru work doesn't cover IUDs (but will happily cover oral contraceptives that cost $25+/month, go figure). And the clinic I went to would have given it me for a lower cost (or free) if I'd pleaded poverty. I really like the one-time cost thing. Heck, even the cost of condoms add up, depending on quantity needed!

I would recommend it to any woman (Mustachian or otherwise), if she has a lower-risk lifestyle. It doesn't protect against STIs or other infections, so if lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners is your thing then an IUD is probably not your best choice. Untreated infections can destroy future fertility, so you also need to keep on top of STI screening to protect yourself (you are anyway, right???)

Mayan

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Re: Mustachian Birth Control
« Reply #46 on: October 30, 2013, 10:54:58 PM »
Most forms of birth control will be free under Obamacare starting January 1, 2014. Can you wait until then?

I think that provision went into effect o Jan 1 of 2013, though I could be mistaken

My insurer changed their policy at the beginning of the year and I paid $0 out of pocket for a paragard.  It's been a good choice for me, so I'll add another vote for IUDs