Author Topic: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?  (Read 7287 times)

iamsoners

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Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« on: January 12, 2015, 08:56:43 PM »
Hi all, I'm an old forum poster who fell off the forum wagon for a long time after the birth of my first son. I'm getting back into it though and wondering if I can seek out the advice of any people out there who might be Paramedics/EMT or otherwise work in emergency medical response.

When my son was born, it was a natural opportunity for me to quit my old line of work (non-profit management) which I was un-happy with for many reasons to spend time with my son and reflect on what, if any, work I'd like to do next. After a lot of self-reflection, I am strongly thinking about going the Paramedic route as I hope it will, 1. give me work that has nothing or very little to do with MS Outlook, 2. Doesn't play to my weakness for procrastinating tasks I don't want to do and dreading them (I figure if someone needs a line started, I can't put that off) 3. fulfills an enjoyment of adrenaline and 4. continues my previous works' thrust of helping people.

One other piece of information is that I am very specifically hoping to work for the emergency transport division of our local children's hospital. It has 2 helis, 1 fixed wing and a fleet of ambulances. My plan is to get my EMT and then start in dispatch and spend some time there figuring out if I want to actually move into the field and if so, whether to do so as a Paramedic, RT or (very unlikely) RN. Does that sounds like a reasonable approach?

My questions for those of you that are already in this field are this:
Do you perceive it as difficult for someone in their mid-30s to break into this field? Is getting jobs in the field more about who you know or your skill set?
How much education should I pursue before trying to just get experience (right now I'm thinking get my EMT and then hopefully get the dispatch job but if that doesn't open, get a job doing anything in the ER for the experience's sake)
How tough is shift work? The hospital I'm hoping for works 12 hours, 7 to 7. I am very much a night owl so would be open to overnights but the concern would be how do you manage shift work with a family in tow--would love to hear lots of insight on that.
And would love any other general feedback on the plan.

In regards to money, I've been a mustachian (without knowing it) since I was 16 so have a good deal of savings and my retirement is on autodrive--we aren't in a place where we can both be retired but one of us making enough to cover living expenses is enough for us. This is more about finding a fulfilling job than trying to accelerate retirement.

Primm

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2015, 09:03:14 PM »
My questions for those of you that are already in this field are this:
Do you perceive it as difficult for someone in their mid-30s to break into this field? Is getting jobs in the field more about who you know or your skill set?

No. In fact some of the best new grads I've worked with have been mature age. The younger ones (ha! Showing my age here) can believe that their education - Masters etc. - trumps on the job experience, sometimes with devastating consequences.

Quote
How much education should I pursue before trying to just get experience (right now I'm thinking get my EMT and then hopefully get the dispatch job but if that doesn't open, get a job doing anything in the ER for the experience's sake)

I'll leave this for someone with more knowledge of the US system to answer.

Quote
How tough is shift work? The hospital I'm hoping for works 12 hours, 7 to 7. I am very much a night owl so would be open to overnights but the concern would be how do you manage shift work with a family in tow--would love to hear lots of insight on that.

I work 12 hour shifts, same hours as your local hospital. You feel like you're just caught in the work-eat-sleep-work cycle when you're on shift, but 4 days off every week? Can't top that! Also shift work is far more family friendly than everyone working office hours, particularly with regard to childcare. One of you will be at home with the kids more, and it will end up being far cheaper.

Good luck and keep us posted!

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2015, 09:05:26 PM »
Not what you are looking for but as an experienced pilot I can tell you that medical transport has an abnormally high accident rate.

This make sense if you think about it.. Medical flying is mostly visual.. that means you have to see the ground, they can't fly high enough to use instrument procedures (i.e flying in clouds). That means the helicopter has to get to the scene of an accident flying visually.

Flying visually near the ground (and power lines, trees etc) in bad weather is called scud running.. its a pretty dangerous practice because in marginal weather the clouds can come down low and cut you off.

If you think about it.. when do all the road accidents happen?.. You guessed it.. In bad weather!

Not saying I wouldn't do it, but I'd certainly think twice about climbing in the back of the chopper with life threatening injuries where everyone one wants to push the safe flying boundaries because there is a life on the line.

Frank

Primm

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2015, 09:09:41 PM »
Not what you are looking for but as an experienced pilot I can tell you that medical transport has an abnormally high accident rate.

This make sense if you think about it.. Medical flying is mostly visual.. that means you have to see the ground, they can't fly high enough to use instrument procedures (i.e flying in clouds). That means the helicopter has to get to the scene of an accident flying visually.

Flying visually near the ground (and power lines, trees etc) in bad weather is called scud running.. its a pretty dangerous practice because in marginal weather the clouds can come down low and cut you off.

If you think about it.. when do all the road accidents happen?.. You guessed it.. In bad weather!

Not saying I wouldn't do it, but I'd certainly think twice about climbing in the back of the chopper with life threatening injuries where everyone one wants to push the safe flying boundaries because there is a life on the line.

Frank

I'd never considered that. Maybe I should up my life insurance? :)

Although when we were doing chopper training and they taught us how to get out of a submerged aircraft one of our staff asked the instructor how to get out if it crashed on land rather than in water. "Don't worry about that" was the cryptic and slightly disturbing answer.

Exflyboy

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2015, 09:10:58 PM »
Not what you are looking for but as an experienced pilot I can tell you that medical transport has an abnormally high accident rate.

This make sense if you think about it.. Medical flying is mostly visual.. that means you have to see the ground, they can't fly high enough to use instrument procedures (i.e flying in clouds). That means the helicopter has to get to the scene of an accident flying visually.

Flying visually near the ground (and power lines, trees etc) in bad weather is called scud running.. its a pretty dangerous practice because in marginal weather the clouds can come down low and cut you off.

If you think about it.. when do all the road accidents happen?.. You guessed it.. In bad weather!

Not saying I wouldn't do it, but I'd certainly think twice about climbing in the back of the chopper with life threatening injuries where everyone one wants to push the safe flying boundaries because there is a life on the line.

Frank

I'd never considered that. Maybe I should up my life insurance? :)

Although when we were doing chopper training and they taught us how to get out of a submerged aircraft one of our staff asked the instructor how to get out if it crashed on land rather than in water. "Don't worry about that" was the cryptic and slightly disturbing answer.

Yeah I would't "worry about it" either..:)

thingamabobs

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2015, 11:54:17 PM »
When you say work for dispatch, do you mean as a dispatcher? Because that gets zero patient care experience and unlikely to show you whether or not you want to continue in emergency services. After you get your EMT certification, you could volunteer if your town/county has a volunteer ambulance service. Most paramedic schools require at least 1 if not 2 years of service as a basic EMT before being allowed to apply. You can work as a technician in the ED which would put you in the middle of the action.

Unless you're thinking of going for nursing, which it doesn't sound like you are, then there really isn't more education that would be beneficial.

Regarding shift work, depends on your personality. Some people like regularity and knowing that every week they are working specific days and specific hours. I can't stand it. Some weeks will be great, 3 on, 4 off. Some weeks will be crap and maybe you haven't had a day off in 8 days but those are usually followed by a longer span of days off. Family life, it depends on how yours operates. Here's mine if I'm working overnights: get home 8am, shower, eat something, crash until 3 or 4p, get up, eat something, catch up with family for about an hour and back to work.

I believe they ask if you have plans of flying in a helicopter when you apply for life insurance.

teen persuasion

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2015, 06:12:51 AM »
DH joined a volunteer fire department here, and got his EMT training thru them.  He is BLS at this point, but could train for ALS at some future point.  Several of his FF buddies are dispatchers.

Joining a volunteer FC is one way to get some training and exposure, to see if you like it, and make some contacts.  It just doesn't pay anything, and you do a lot more fundraising than calls.  Then again, it is always a good week when the beeper doesn't go off for three days!

5oclockshadow

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2015, 09:01:34 AM »
Former EMT, current doc here.  A bunch of random considerations:

- An RN is longer training but much higher earning potential than a paramedic (especially if you move on to nurse practicioner, etc).  More importantly, an RN allows for many, many more practice opportunities.  I have nursing friends who do stuff worthy of action movies in the trauma unit, and others who sip coffee at a computer screen.  There aren't many coffee sipping paramedic jobs.  That may not appeal to you now, but if you have arthritic knees and back at age 50, an RN may be preferable.
- Most critical care transport jobs require experience.  In my hospital, it's 5 years of paramedic experience or ICU/Emergency Department nursing experience before you can even apply.  If yours is the same, and you go the medic route, can your body handle 5 years of hauling 300 pound folks on stretchers out of 4th floor apartments in buildings where the elevator is (as it always is) out of service?
-  It can be difficult to be hired in a metopolitan fire department/EMS squad.  A lot of medics end up doing private ambulance transport, which is basically nursing home taxi driving.  I enjoyed the old ladies, but most people don't, and the critical care transport folks probably wouldn't consider that valid experience.  The other option as a medic would be to work in an emergency department ED, which sounds like a good option for you. 
- The safety issue brought up before is a real issue in 2 senses.  First, people who work night shift have a significantly decreased life expectancy compared to people who work day shift.  Like, by a few years. Messing with sleep is really bad for you.  I work nights sometimes.  I'm glad others are willing to, as well.  Just be aware.  Second, helicopter transport is really unsafe.  Our hospital helicopters are sweet $7million machines with 2 engines and have never had an accident in >30 years of operating.  The private helicopters that come to my hospital are old, crappy, single-engine, and will fly in weather you wouldn't drive in because they have to keep their numbers in the black.  They have lost 2 helicopters (6 crew and 1 patient) in the past 4 years.  Again, just be aware of what you're getting into.  (Re: life insurance- most applications will ask regarding "high risk" activities if you have done them or have any plans for them within the next 2 years.  So if you are serious about this and need insurance, you might want to apply for insurance soon).
- If you were 50, age might be an issue.  At your age, it isn't.
- Getting a job is about who you know.  Critical care transport is a fairly tight community where risks are much greater than typical medical practice.  The guy next to you has to know a little turbulence isn't going to result in the dirty syringe in your hand ending up in his thigh.  They are most likely to hire a known entity.  The great majority of our hiring is internal.
- If you are somewhat rural you can probably join the local fire department without any training and they will pay for most of your training. 
- An EMT basic course would be a few grand and takes just 4 months (2 nights per week).  There are accelerated courses that take just 3 weeks, full time.  It's a fairly cheap and easy way to dip your toes in the water of the field.

If I were you, and I was pretty confident this is what I wanted to do, I would call or figure out how to get a message to the local peds hospital transport dispatch folks and ask if there's someone to talk to.  Let them know your thoughts and find out what it would take.  You may also be able to ride along for a day (they may not do this if you aren't already an EMT or nursing student).

Best of luck.

iamsoners

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2015, 11:30:08 AM »
Hey all--thanks so much for the feedback, it's all very helpful!

BoulderJay

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2015, 02:27:14 PM »
Howdy!  Lots of good advice already, but ill add my 2 cents.

Let me just start by saying that EMS can be a great career, but certainly has its peculiarities.  I've been a nurse for 11 years.  The first 5 of those were as an ICU/ED nurse in an inner city level 1 trauma center.  The last 6 years have been as a flight nurse for 2 different programs (first one was heli only with an EMS and public safety mission, current job is with a hospital based program with multiple helis, jets and ambulances). I'd like to offer a few thoughts and suggestions....

First, how to reach your goal...Understand that this is a long road to travel.   No matter which route you pursue, you're looking at 3-5 years working before most flight programs will consider you a viable applicant. 

Medic vs nurse...if you want to be a street medic then go to paramedic school.  If your end goal is really to fly, then you are probably better off going the nursing route.  Lots (def not all) of flight programs still treat medics as second class providers.  While this is stupid and backwards (as medics bring a great deal to the table that nurses are lacking when they first start doing transport), it is the reality of the industry.  You'll likely end up with greater autonomy as a nurse.  If you are targeting a specialty team, this is probably even more true.  In fact most of the pediatric teams I know use an RN/RT combo.  Not to mention, better pay and more diverse opportunities.  Though it does mean 3-5 yrs as a bedside nurse.

If I had to do it over, I'd start as an EMT-basic in a service that had basics doing 911 response with paramedic partners.  I'd do that through nursing school, then work toward a job in an ICU or ED (or PICU if you're aiming for a pediatric team).

I think the advice offered above about getting an EMT-basic cert and working or volunteering at that level would give you an idea what you're in for doing EMS.  Ditto with a ride along (if you're in the Denver area I can help with this).  Oh yeah, dispatch probably wouldn't be the best use of your time for getting to a flying job.

Age...non-factor as long as you are up for hard work and longish shifts.

Shift work...with some seniority you might eventually get away from this, but the reality is that you will work 12 hr (or longer) shifts that include nights, weekends and holidays.  As mentioned, nights can screw up your health.  Nature of the beast.  That said, many flight programs have rest policies that allow/encourage rest on duty.  Also, I've actually found the schedule great for family life.  Lots of time at home.  But , my wife has been staying at home with the kids, which makes the schedule much easier than trying to combine it with another schedule. YMMV.

Safety...Helicopter EMS does have a higher accident rate than most other forms of aviation.  Lots of the reasons for this are noted earlier in the thread.  This is a huge topic.  It can be done with a high degree of safety by having the right training/procedures/culture, but none of that can completely take away the risks.  Serious things to think about before getting into the field.  I'd be happy to discuss this in greater detail offline if you're interested (any of it actually).

Last bit, I went into nursing cuz I heard nurses only work 3 days a week, but have been incredibly blessed to be in this field.  I have enjoyed every nursing job I've had.

Whoa..sry that went so long.  Hope it was helpful and let me know if I can give any more info.

iamsoners

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2015, 04:50:07 PM »
So helpful, thank you to all of you.  Any RTs out there able to weigh in?

Primm

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2015, 07:19:10 PM »

Medic vs nurse...if you want to be a street medic then go to paramedic school.  If your end goal is really to fly, then you are probably better off going the nursing route.  Lots (def not all) of flight programs still treat medics as second class providers.  While this is stupid and backwards (as medics bring a great deal to the table that nurses are lacking when they first start doing transport), it is the reality of the industry.  You'll likely end up with greater autonomy as a nurse.  If you are targeting a specialty team, this is probably even more true.  In fact most of the pediatric teams I know use an RN/RT combo.  Not to mention, better pay and more diverse opportunities.  Though it does mean 3-5 yrs as a bedside nurse.


This too. Our retrieval teams are RN/Dr/Pilot/EMT. All of the patient care is done by the RN/Dr duo. The EMT is there to load the stretcher into the aircraft (literally, that's all they do) and drive the ambulance to and from the airport in the case of a fixed wing retrieval. You may be disappointed by the amount of actual work you get to do if you go the EMT route on a retrieval team.

Edited to add: I forgot about the RT role in the US. We don't have those, the RN is responsible for all of the ventilatory support during transport. So it's kind of an RN/RT blend. Dr intubates and puts lines in, we take over and do the rest unless things go pear shaped and you need 2 people (cardiac compressions on descent are always fun...).
« Last Edit: January 13, 2015, 07:20:44 PM by Primm »

korn_man55

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2015, 08:51:41 PM »
I thought I would put my two cents in the topic here too.  I will give a little background about my career path.  I started out as a first responder at a coal mine.  I then took the EMT-B course and the coal mine payed for my training.  I also took the fire fighter 1 and wildland fire training courses through the mine.  This sparked my interest in the medical field so I went to nursing school and I now work as an ER nurse.  EMT-B course is a semester long course and it I feel it prepares you well to work on an ambulance rig with paramedics.  I am from a rural area so I got good experience working part-time at a private ambulance company where my partners were paramedics.  I also volunteered at a local fire department and they helped pay and sponsor a lot of my training too.  This is a good way to get experience if you find the right kind of volunteer department.  We responded to a lot of fires, vehicle accidents, and everyday medical calls. 

I have been doing shift work for around 10 years, and I really like the night shifts.  I sleep well during the day even with my youngest kids making lots of noise.  I was around 28 when I went to nursing school, and many of my classmates were second career students too.  I debated a lot about whether I wanted to be a nurse or a paramedic, but my decision came down to more opportunities in nursing.  There are so many different options for your career when being a nurse.  I went through an associates program so it only took me about 3 years to get my RN degree, paramedic would have been about the same amount of time depending if you have some prerequisites.  I have many fond memories of my EMS time, and would like to volunteer again someday.  Overall, I really love my ER job, and there would be opportunities to work as an ER tech or paramedic in the ER.  You will want lots of good experience if you are going to get into flight. 

Good luck and if you have any other questions let me know. 

Exflyboy

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2015, 09:11:51 PM »

Medic vs nurse...if you want to be a street medic then go to paramedic school.  If your end goal is really to fly, then you are probably better off going the nursing route.  Lots (def not all) of flight programs still treat medics as second class providers.  While this is stupid and backwards (as medics bring a great deal to the table that nurses are lacking when they first start doing transport), it is the reality of the industry.  You'll likely end up with greater autonomy as a nurse.  If you are targeting a specialty team, this is probably even more true.  In fact most of the pediatric teams I know use an RN/RT combo.  Not to mention, better pay and more diverse opportunities.  Though it does mean 3-5 yrs as a bedside nurse.


This too. Our retrieval teams are RN/Dr/Pilot/EMT. All of the patient care is done by the RN/Dr duo. The EMT is there to load the stretcher into the aircraft (literally, that's all they do) and drive the ambulance to and from the airport in the case of a fixed wing retrieval. You may be disappointed by the amount of actual work you get to do if you go the EMT route on a retrieval team.

Edited to add: I forgot about the RT role in the US. We don't have those, the RN is responsible for all of the ventilatory support during transport. So it's kind of an RN/RT blend. Dr intubates and puts lines in, we take over and do the rest unless things go pear shaped and you need 2 people (cardiac compressions on descent are always fun...).

Yeah and I bet the pilot comes down fast when he sees you doing them too..:)

I was up doing aerobatics with a guy once and he seemed fine.. Now you get real good at detecting when somebody might loose their lunch in your airplane.. so when this guy stopped talking.. i turned to look at him and he was grey in the face, sweating and had his left arm curled into his chest.. well lets just say it was the first 240mph final approach to the airport in living memory..:)

Thankfully the local mediflight group operates out of my local airport and the EMT was ready with the crash cart when we arrived... he was fine.. just very airsick..

Apparently he was a little alarmed when he saw how fast we were approaching the ground.. I had turned off the transmitted audio feed so he couldn't tell I was asking for urgent medical assistance..:)


takeahike

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2015, 09:40:17 PM »
I got my bachelor's in nursing at age 39. I'm now an ICU nurse in a Level 1 trauma centre. Yeah it rocks.. and sometimes I do feel old when it's a 12 hr night and all hell breaks loose in the last hour of the shift. But, if this is something you really want to do, then go for it. I vote for nursing because of the flexibility, autonomy, skills, etc. If you get burned out in one area, you can move on to another. It is a commitment though. I started at age 36 with this dream, graduated at 39.. worked in geriatrics/dementia for 2 years (to get foot in the door), then took an additional year course in critical care nursing with full on practicum with the sole purpose of getting into the ICU. It worked.. but it was hard and humbling. Now I'm nearly 3 years in ICU and I still feel like I have so much to learn. You have to really want it to do it.

NonprofitER

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2015, 06:58:56 AM »
I am married to a former Paramedic turned ICU/ER nurse at a children's hospital who is also trying to earn enough brownie points to eventually join a transport team. 

I would echo what everyone else has said regarding the nursing route being far more flexible, more highly compensated and more likely to earn you enough acute care experience to get into a transport gig.  My sense of it has been that it takes some ladder climbing to get into a great acute care setting and then a good 5+ years of experience to get into transport.  The positions in our area (Austin) don't open up that often and the competition is pretty tight for them because transport team folks work less overall hours and make great pay (upwards of $100k). 

Nursing is a longer commitment in terms of schooling, clinical rotations, etc. though.  My husband somehow made it through full time nursing school and full time work during our child's first two years... but its pretty much a blur in retrospect. 

Are you planning to have other children?  You may just want to be mindful of how that fits with timing of school, clinicals, etc.  We have known several pregnant nurses who had a harder time being on their feet for 12 hour shifts.  They have all succeeded and stayed in nursing post-baby, etc. but its required more deliberate thought about timing, family support, breastfeeding/pumping (if applicable), etc.


JeanetteDeguzman

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2016, 12:28:13 AM »
First of all, welcome back and congratulations on your birth.  That by itself is a great feat! :)
You list some of the benefits and advantages of getting into the Paramedic/EMT route, but obviously as you know there are Cons to it too (accident rates, tough hours, exposure to certain elements, etc.).  Breaking into any field in your mid-30s can be tough, but it's certainly not impossible if you have the motivation.  I have seen many mid-30s enter this field.  Being a night owl will help you taking up the late shifts but considering that you have children at home you would obviously require the support of a husband or someone else that can be there for your little one(s).  I agree with much of what 5oclockshadow said too.  The increasing demand of EMT and healthcare jobs has lead to some interesting opportunities and trends.  I've read recent articles that this industry will grow over time, especially considering the newly released ObamaCare.  According to various studies found by different recruitment agencies like www.indeed.com and http://doctorschoiceplacement.com they show that demand is high and opportunities for people like yourself are very much real and attainable.  I wish you the best of luck!!


JimLahey

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2016, 10:44:12 AM »
I got my EMT-B in 09'. I didn't actually utilize it until 11' when I got hired as an EMT at a private ambulance service. They are a high volume service that does 911 and non-emergent transports. I worked as an EMT for a couple of years and got my Paramedic almost two years ago. I got an ER gig last Spring and enrolled in an online Medic to RN bridge program. It's a self study program so if I can get motivated I could be done in two years or less.
I think getting your EMT-B is a great idea because it is typically only a semester long class and you can get a lot of experience. I would not work as a dispatcher. At the service I worked for that ended up being a dead end for most people. Once they got trained in dispatch they were never on a truck except for extra shifts or when a warm body was needed to staff a truck. Volunteer or get on at a local service and work on a truck. The pay will not be that great. I was making $12/hr as an EMT. I know quite a few people your age that became Medics. It's a little harder because most are married, have kids, etc. but it can be done. Most flight services/Critical Care require at least three years of experience. So keep that in mind.
I like 12 hour shifts. I get more days off during the week. I typically work 3pm-3am and every other weekend. I'm not a morning person so I don't mind shift work. Also we get a a shift incentive for evening/nights. I'm not married and don't have kids yet so I can't speak of that but I think having extra days off during the week would be beneficial. If I could go back to my first year of college I probably would have done nursing school. It's just a more stable job and the pay ceiling is much higher. I was Pre-Med initially so I was already taking a lot of the prerequisites that nursing school requires, which was beneficial when enrolling in the bridge program. There are bridge programs for RNs to become Medics as well. So if you go one route and decide to change it up there are options. I know a couple of nurses that have became medics and vice versa. Good luck.

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2016, 09:17:06 PM »
The service around here does 24 hour shifts. Pretty great gig. I contract with them as an EMT occasionally when they get desperate enough to pay my hourly rate.  Around here it's a medic and an emt in a rig. Some areas run that way, some run that way with the EMT being basically a glorified driver. There are areas that are moving away from running medics in all rigs (Wanna say King County, for obvious reasons, but wouldn't bank on it.) and only sending out EMTs for most of the calls - no difference in positive outcomes.  So it could go that way in the future, as well.

iamsoners

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2016, 01:49:47 PM »
Hi all,
As an update: I just finished up my EMT-B license and am setting out to get a job--either as a care tech in the local pediatric hospital or an EMT (literally only driving) for their transport service.  I was glad to do clinicals as part of the EMT process--2 out of 3 of my patients when I worked the ambulance were combative AMS patients who ended up in padded rooms... While it was fun, I'm not sure wrestling in the back of a moving truck is what I want to do day in and day out.  So off to the hospital I go! For now at least.  The plan now is to work a year or two and decide whether I want to go the medic or RN route...

Thanks again for all the great advice!

Metric Mouse

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Re: Any Paramedics/EMTs/ER nurses/docs out there?
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2016, 01:52:06 PM »
Hi all,
As an update: I just finished up my EMT-B license and am setting out to get a job--either as a care tech in the local pediatric hospital or an EMT (literally only driving) for their transport service.  I was glad to do clinicals as part of the EMT process--2 out of 3 of my patients when I worked the ambulance were combative AMS patients who ended up in padded rooms... While it was fun, I'm not sure wrestling in the back of a moving truck is what I want to do day in and day out.  So off to the hospital I go! For now at least.  The plan now is to work a year or two and decide whether I want to go the medic or RN route...

Thanks again for all the great advice!

Congrats! Giant accomplishment! I hope everything goes well for you!