Author Topic: Moving to Canada and need some advice  (Read 3902 times)

Odinthewanderer

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Moving to Canada and need some advice
« on: June 07, 2016, 02:56:38 PM »
I have been a longtime lurker on this site and my impending move has finally jolted me into joining the community.  Any advice on my situation would be much appreciated! I have done some research on my own but am somewhat overwhelmed by the logistics of the move.

General Info:
I am a soon-to-be graduate student at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. I am moving in ~two weeks from Utah and will be arriving in Edmonton on/around July 1st.

Questions:
1.   Are there any easily accessible and dependable Canadian banks that would be good to open a checking account with?

2.   What are some good (affordable) cell-phone companies that operate in Canada? I am currently using republic wireless but I have heard that it doesn’t work well in some parts of Canada. I only use ~200mb of data and <100 minutes per month on my plan.

3.   Any other general advice?

Thanks!

Gerard

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2016, 03:35:46 PM »
Hi Odin, welcome to the list and to Canada. Cool that you arrive around July 1, Canada Day.

There are basically only five (very large) Canadian banks: BMO, Scotiabank, CIBC, TD Canada Trust, and Royal Bank, plus National in the east. They're all equally dependable and accessible (there's more government oversight of banks here). You might also consider Tangerine or a supermarket-affiliated bank like President's Choice for stuff where you don't need to go in person. Be sure to tell your bank people that you're new to Canada, and that you're a graduate student. They may have special offers for you, or require less in the way of references etc.

Most Canadians will tell you that there are no good cheap cell phone companies here. I use 7-11's Speakout for my minimal needs, but I don't do anything with data. Somebody else will know more than I do.

Edmonton might be Canada's dullest large city, but the people are nice. Their economy is not great right now, so you should find some good deals on Stuff and on travel.

<edited to remove quoted OP, because people can just read it above my post...>
« Last Edit: June 07, 2016, 04:52:04 PM by Gerard »

RetiredAt63

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2016, 04:12:50 PM »
Welcome.

What Gerard said. 

Banks - All the banks have online sites, you can look at the various options and see what is best for you before you ever walk in the door.  A lot of banking is online, but it is nice to have easy access to a branch, so something close to where you will be living or your campus would be good for your home branch.  You might also want to look at debit charge use, free locations, and fees for each.

July 1 is a big holiday (think almost everything closed) so plan accordingly.  Also plan for holiday celebrations and fireworks. 

TrMama

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2016, 04:27:39 PM »
Ditto this advice. Banks here are pretty much all the same and all are reliable. My parents live in the US in the winter and their heads explode anytime they have to do anything with a US bank. The front line workers don't seem to be terribly competent compared to the ones here. I'd just call ahead and make sure you have whatever ID you'll need to open a checking account. Be sure to tell them you're a US citizen.

There aren't as many cell carriers here as there are in the US, so prices tend to be pretty homogenous (kind of like the banks). I just switched to Telus (aka Bell) for $35/month for talk and text only. That's about the best I can do here.

As for other stuff, July 1 is Canada Day and a major holiday. Do not attempt to do any banking on that day. Just go drink beer and have fun. Edmonton gets colder in the winter than Utah (it'll be plenty warm in July though). Make sure you pack your warm clothes. Winter is tons of fun if you're not cold. If you're bringing a car, have a block heater and winter tires put on it in the fall.

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2016, 05:14:18 PM »
Bienvenue!

Being a Canadian who has lived in the States and moved back home, I would make the following suggestions (this advice assumes that you are an American citizen or permanent resident):

1. Bank somewhere that makes it easy to hold both U.S. dollar and Cdn dollar accounts. I use TD: they have a preferred-rate currency-conversion account ("Borderless" acct) although you might find better elsewhere. You are required to inform your bank that you are a US Citizen.

2. Your credit score in the US does not translate to Canada, even though we use the same credit rating agencies. If you want to build up your credit score in Canada (to make it easier to rent an apartment, for example), get a secured credit card from that bank.

3. You may need your US dollars because you will have to keep filing taxes with the IRS while you live here, and report any Cdn income you make (as well as filing a return for the same income to the Canada Revenue Agency). You will also have to file a Foreign Bank Account Report. There are many wiser people than I to advise you on specifics with these things, here and elsewhere: I suggest you consult the forums at Serbinski Accounting.

4. Even when you become an official Canadian resident and are eligible to do so, do NOT open a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA). You will regret it deeply at tax time.

5. You will have to wait a certain amount of time before you qualify for publicly-funded health care, so make sure you have insurance that will cover you in Canada. Refer to http://www.health.alberta.ca/AHCIP/registration-requirements.html

6. There is a lot of paperwork if you buy a car in Canada and then want to "import" it into the US when you move back (I have no idea if there are similar requirements to import a US car to Canada, sorry). If you lease or finance a car purchased in Canada, you will not be permitted to import into the States it until it has been fully paid for.

7. We don't have "checking" accounts. They are called "chequing" accounts :)

Odinthewanderer

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2016, 08:49:17 PM »
Thanks to everyone for the great info; I really appreciate you all taking the time to help me out! It gives me some good directions to look into once I arrive. I love winter/cold so I expect I will have a grand time in Edmonton. A good deal of the summer this year and in following years will probably be spent doing field work in BC. The info gained from this thread will make my relocation a bit easier. =)

KMMK

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2016, 08:53:51 PM »
I lived in Edmonton until I was 24 and will be moving back around September 1 so may be able to help with more specific questions. Personally I'm a bit out of date but have friends/family there too.

Others have given good advice about using any major bank.

Do you know where you are living? The area near U of A is great. Easy for walking or biking, lots of interesting restaurants and shopping (not that I shop much); crappy for driving as it's crowded. I love the trees and older buildings.

Definitely have health insurance lined up.

kijiji is our biggest "craigslist-type" website so check that out for housing, free stuff, secondhand merchandise etc.

Other than hopefully future MMM group meetups (not too many of us, but I'll be trying to find others after I move), try meetup.com for meeting off-campus people.

Goldielocks

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2016, 09:30:41 PM »
I second the "Tangerine" comment, especially if you won't have to bring in large US currency amounts through a customs house.

Phones

We use Kodoo -- the basic $15 per month plan, for unlimited texting and a small amount of minutes, that you pay for "booster paks" such as data paks and minutes paks that don't expire.   This way, and using WIFI, we have cut the phone bills to $15 to $30 per month.

If you want to roam with LOTS of data, there is another prepaid plan, with higher starting per month, but the data is lowest cost for a lot of data.

Lastly, watch out for both US calling fees, and network coverage.  For example, Rogers is a big player, but for some reason has horrible coverage outside of major urban areas and roaming is very expensive.  Not a problem if you stay in the city.

Check out WHYTE Avenue.   Have fun.  Edmonton's a pretty young city.     My cousin and now a work friend both bike through the winter.  He went to U of A, too.

pekklemafia

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2016, 09:55:36 PM »
I have been a longtime lurker on this site and my impending move has finally jolted me into joining the community.  Any advice on my situation would be much appreciated! I have done some research on my own but am somewhat overwhelmed by the logistics of the move.

General Info:
I am a soon-to-be graduate student at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. I am moving in ~two weeks from Utah and will be arriving in Edmonton on/around July 1st.

Questions:
1.   Are there any easily accessible and dependable Canadian banks that would be good to open a checking account with?

2.   What are some good (affordable) cell-phone companies that operate in Canada? I am currently using republic wireless but I have heard that it doesn’t work well in some parts of Canada. I only use ~200mb of data and <100 minutes per month on my plan.

3.   Any other general advice?

Thanks!

I live in Edmonton and my partner is a grad student at the U of A right now. Small world. We also live a stone's throw away from the U of A. Edmonton is a nice city - there's lots going on in terms of festivals and things to do, and there's lots of green space if you like using the trails. If you have any specific questions, feel free to PM me.

1) Banks - a credit union or ATB financial (a crown corporation) might be a good bet if you don't want to go with the "big five". (Although personally I bank with BMO because I've been too lazy to switch.) PC financial is also good for being low-fee - except you'd have to go to Superstore to do your banking (it's a chain grocery).

2) I'm using Koodo right now for cell phone, it's 35$/month for 300mb of data. Can't remember how many minutes because I never call anyone... But it is enough if you are mostly a texter.

3) Don't go to whyte ave late at night on the weekends... Unless you like it when drunk people yell "WOOOOOOO!!!" in your face every half a block :)


backyardfeast

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2016, 10:45:47 PM »
Nothing to add to the banking and cell advice, but I'm another one who was a graduate student at UofA and had a great experience, so feel free to ask for more specific advice too.  Plus I'm super-passionate about life in BC, so ask any questions about that too! :)

Sounds like you're up for an awesome adventure!

Maya Freegalson

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2016, 05:23:55 PM »
All the banks are dependable, but I like TD because at least in my area (Ottawa), they are practically the only bank to have reasonable branch hours beyond just 9 to 5 Monday to Friday. In other words, they're the only ones that acknowledge that most people work. We have also used President's Choice for a simple no-fee account.

For cell phones, we are with Wind Mobile and have found them to be the cheapest for phones with data plans. The reception can be spotty (doesn't work well deep inside large buildings or on the outskirts of town), so we do get frustrated sometimes, but have been liking the price too much to do anything about it.

FunkyMustache

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2016, 06:01:21 PM »
You should also check out credit unions instead of banks. I think they are more common in Canada than the US. My parents are in Edmonton and use Servus. All the credit unions are connected so you can use any credit union ATM without fees. You will have to pay upfront for shares, mine were $50, but you get that back when you leave. I find the fees are less than banks and the customer service is generally better.

For mobile check out Wind. If you are only in the city, it gets ok reception. It's the only one in Canada with unlimited data, although without reception, it doesn't matter. I would suggest trying them first, without a contract, then switch providers if you have a problem with the reception. If you go out of the city, you will be paying to roam on a "Wind Partner", ie, a better phone company.

Dmy0013

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2016, 09:56:35 PM »
You should buy a Edmonton Oilers jersey so you blend in...

I believe in Edmonton you can go with a company called wind mobile... I'm not 100% sure though...

I live in neighbouring Saskatchewan.  I see advertising / commercials for wind mobile and it seems like it could be a good deal?  Its not available in saskatchewan so I have never really looked into it to much, but might be worth looking into...

Goldielocks

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #13 on: June 09, 2016, 11:47:07 AM »
        Found it!  My cheap canada cellphone spreadsheet I created 4 months ago,

Compared costs for the following scenarios:
  • 500MB data/month, 100 texts, 30 minutes of calling
  • 500MB data, 100 texts, 60minutes of calling
  • 750 MB Data, 100 texts, 60 minutes of calling

NOTE --we dont talk on the phone very much, so unlimited minutes plans are of little value... YMMV
And I looked at average costs as well as that twice a year "we spiked over our limit" and how easy each plan was to limit the impact.  e.g., a booster pack that expires is very easy to control, but a monthly plan that charges (a lot!) more automatically is not.

I looked at monthly plans, but with the limited calling time I was interested in, I limited it to Pre paid very quickly.

Cell Companies Researched:

  • Virgin
  • Fido
  • Koodo
  • Chatr
  • Bell
    • Telus
    • 7-11 Speakout
      • Public Mobile
      • PetroCan
-----------argh stupid list feature---  there is no meaning to my indents---

Results;
BEST for Moderate DATA
Koodo was by far the cheapest on a monthly basis, up to 500MB of data use a month.  Koodo uses a data pak, so the data and minutes never expire, and has a $15 monthly base fee for unlimited texting.  Koodo drops to under $20/month very quickly for any month that you use it less (e.g. vacation to the USA), so if you have some short months, you get the instant benefit of it.  It is my kids plan, as for $15/mo they can be always connected, yet let it run out of minutes and data and just "boost" as they want to prior to an event.
Average Cost:  $18.50 per month (30 min/mo of talk);  $33/mo average.  (60 min/mo.)
                     -But, the monthly cost spikes if data averages 750 MB /mo.  to $55.50/month

Best for Lots of Data, with talking
Public Mobile. has pretty much a constant $40 per month cost, for unlimited text, talk and 4 GB data, if you buy 90 day packs at a time.   This is extra great as the minutes are for 90 days, and do not expire after every 30 days, so you can really use get your use out of them.

It also has the cheapest extra data purchase cost at $10 per 200 MB good for 90 days.  And that is prompted, so you get to decide if you want to have that cost or not, it is not a surprise.

Downside is that $120 per 3 months is pretty locked in, if you don't use your phone much for a couple of months, you won't get the benefit of it ($ back).

Others have mentioned Wind. 
WIND
I did not review them previously, as they are not in good coverage for us, so looked it up just now.  Wind prepaid (DATA over 750MB) is $35/month for unlimited talk and text and 2GB of data.   This is the price point for all my scenarios above, as data under this costs $5/100MB to a max of $30/mo.  However their big data offer is only $40 per month for 3GB of data + 2GB bonus data.   

So Wind is very comparable to the Public Mobile positioning until the bonus runs out, or if you only want 2GB data, is $5 /month better.  BUT  I believe it is a 30 day plan package,  so you can't share data across months.  I know that we have a "mega" month of data (say we are stuck on an Ferry and the kids are bored and we download utube for them), and then a very light month (where we are usually in wifi zones).  So the ability to spread the data across different months is a big saver for us.  Otherwise with WIND, and even a 2GB data plan, we could be faced with an extra $20/mo of data charges a couple times per year.


Not included in the evaluation: watch out for coverage service and cost for US calling  (you may do better with a separate long distance calling plan).  We don't call the US from our cellphones, and coverage is either as "yes or no" type gate decision, once we narrow the cost options down.

And yes, bring your own unlocked phone.  Go buy a chinese version that is compatible and wait for the import delay (6-8 weeks) and save a few hundred dollars.

For our US counterparts -- do these cell phone rates look scary?  Note that these are the CHEAPEST plans available.

ETA:  7-11 Speakout was not even close to the cheapest anymore (it used to be).  Instead for a basic "emergency" phone or short duration PetroCan phone starts at $8 per month for zero standby usage....  goes up quickly from there to $20/mo.[/list][/list][/list]
« Last Edit: June 09, 2016, 01:20:41 PM by goldielocks »

RichMoose

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2016, 12:28:34 PM »
General Info:
I am a soon-to-be graduate student at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. I am moving in ~two weeks from Utah and will be arriving in Edmonton on/around July 1st.

Questions:
1.   Are there any easily accessible and dependable Canadian banks that would be good to open a checking account with?
I would use Tangerine, or Servus Credit Union. At Tangerine you can use all Scotiabank ATMs free of charge, and they have ATMs in all 7-11 stores here. Everything is online so it's convenient and easy to use. Servus is good too (my current bank). Fees are waived if you carry a small balance. Oh and get a secured credit card through Capital One or something to start building a credit rating.

2.   What are some good (affordable) cell-phone companies that operate in Canada? I am currently using republic wireless but I have heard that it doesn’t work well in some parts of Canada. I only use ~200mb of data and <100 minutes per month on my plan.
Speakout Wireless (7-11), or Public Mobile are great options if you are bringing your own device. Cell phone plans are much pricier here than in the US. Don't be surprised if for a similar plan your bill is almost double. I would recommend Wind Mobile if you're staying in the city, but if you are doing fieldwork then stay away.

3.   Any other general advice?
Use http://www.kijiji.ca/h-edmonton/1700203 for classifieds. Great for furniture, bikes, rental accomodations etc.
Use https://edmonton.rentfaster.ca/maps/? for rental properties.
Stay relatively close to the University. The Whyte (82nd) Ave corridor, Queen Alexandra, Parkallen, Allendale, Hazeldean, and Ritchie areas offer decent basement suites or small apartments at fairly reasonable prices. These are also within biking distance to the U. Be cautious of room rentals unless you enjoy the company of noisy undergrads.
Whyte (82nd) Ave and Jasper Avenue are the two happening streets in town. Whyte is a bit more liberal / student like, whereas Jasper is more business (suit/tie) feel.
Our bus system generally should be avoided, especially if you are riding a bike to the bus stop. People seem to be quickly annoyed here when someone is struggling to put their bike in the frozen/seized rack on the front of the bus and its -30C outside. Also, buses are frequently late in the winter and personally I would rather be moving on a bike than standing in the cold at a bus stop.

Brokenreign

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2016, 12:52:34 PM »
Welcome from a fellow U of A grad! I warn you in advance that they have the most tenacious alumni donation department on the planet.

Second to Tangerine. Based in your cell phone usage 7-11 speak out would be the cheapest if you already have an unlocked phone.

Kijiji is awesome and there's a lot for sale in Alberta right now for obvious reasons.

Edmonton is a nice enough city but parts of it can get a little rough after dark, especially around Jasper Ave. The area just south of the university is great and has tons of rentals.

Coming from Utah you might find outdoor opportunities a little limited mountain - wise. Nordegg and Jasper are 3-4 hours away. So far as cultural events/entertainment though, Edmonton is great. It's beautiful in the summer.

Greenway52

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2016, 09:29:54 PM »
Hi Odin! And welcome to Canada!

As for banks, as most commenters have mentioned, the Big 5 banks are pretty reliable. If you're looking just for a chequing account, then you can find a no fee chequing account at a big 5 bank as long as you keep a minimum balance requirement. For example, I have what is called the "Everyday Chequing Account" with CIBC where I get 12 transactions per month for $3.90. But the $3.90 is waived if you keep at least $2,000 in your account at all times. I'm sure you can find better deals. I think I've heard Tangerine has a no fee chequing account with no minimum balance requirement, but I don't know much about it. If you're looking for a savings account though, that's when you will find a big advantage with credit unions over big banks, as big banks will give you very little interest on savings accounts or GICs.

As for cell phone - it depends on what you want. I have a 7-11 Speakout phone. It doesn't have a monthly plan or a contract. Its a pay as you go plan. If you're not planning on making many calls and are looking for an emergency phone I would recommend them. The rates are $0.25 per minute and $0.10 for texts sent (texts received are free). They also have a $1.25 monthly charge. Since I use my phone very seldom, it probably costs me $3.00 to $4.00 per month overall. However, if you're looking to make calls/send texts more often, its probably not the best option, but 7-11 does have monthly plans as well.



Mattzlaff

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2016, 04:36:02 AM »
Just gunna say Hi, welcome to my neck of the woods.

I'm from Edmonton and area been here all my life. Everyone who posted is on point with the banks and plans so no real advice there.

Edmonton is great

1. You must first learn to pronounce the city name, it is: 'ED-MIN-TIN'.

2. The morning rush hour is from 5:00 a.m. to noon. The evening rush hour is from noon to 8:00 p.m. Friday's rush hour starts on Thursday morning.

3. The minimum acceptable speed on most freeways is 130 km/h. On the QE2, you are expected to match the speed of the airplanes coming in for a landing at the airport. Anything less is considered 'Wussy'.

4. Forget the traffic rules you learned elsewhere. Edmonton now has its own version of traffic rules. For example, cars/trucks with the loudest muffler go first at a four-way stop; the trucks with the biggest tires go second. However, in Southwest Edmonton, SUV-driving, cell phone-talking moms ALWAYS have the right of way.

5. If you actually stop at a yellow light, you will be rear ended and cussed out.

6. Never honk at anyone. Ever. Seriously.

7. Exception to Rule #6: If you are the 4th car back from a light that has turned green, you must honk your horn to alert the vehicle first at the intersection that the light has changed. Vehicle 2 & 3 won't shoot you as they are too busy trying to figure out how to ram the first vehicle through the intersection.

8. Road construction is permanent and continuous in Edmonton. Detour barrels are moved around during the middle of the night to make the next day's driving a bit more exciting, but nothing ever gets finished, and more construction starts every day.

9. Watch carefully for road hazards such as drunks, skunks, dogs, cats, deer, barrels, cones, cows, horses, mattresses, shredded tires, garbage, squirrels, rabbits, crows, and coyotes feeding on any of these items.

10. Calgary Trail, Gateway Boulevard, Highway 2 and the QE2 are the same road. In the same manner, Whyte Avenue, Sherwood Park Freeway and Wye Road are the same road; Wayne Gretsky Drive, Capilano, 75 Street and 66 Street are also the same road; got it?

11. If someone actually has their turn signal on, wave them to the shoulder immediately to let them know it has been 'accidentally Activated.'

12. If you are in the left lane and only driving 110 in a 80-90 km zone, you are considered a road hazard and will be 'flipped off' accordingly.

13. For winter driving, it is advisable to wear your parka, toque, fur-lined mittens and mukluks. Make sure you have a shovel, food, candle and blankets in the vehicle, as snow removal from the city streets is virtually non-existent until the spring thaw. You also may run out of gas waiting in Tim's drive thru


Not sure where that came from other than Facebook, I found it hilarious (almost 100% accurate) and hope you might too. number 10 is actually true so get ready to be confused for your first while.

RichMoose

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2016, 12:22:17 PM »
Ahhh... traffic cop humour! I love it. :)

pekklemafia

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #19 on: June 10, 2016, 10:01:27 PM »
Just gunna say Hi, welcome to my neck of the woods.

I'm from Edmonton and area been here all my life. Everyone who posted is on point with the banks and plans so no real advice there.

Edmonton is great

1. You must first learn to pronounce the city name, it is: 'ED-MIN-TIN'.

2. The morning rush hour is from 5:00 a.m. to noon. The evening rush hour is from noon to 8:00 p.m. Friday's rush hour starts on Thursday morning.

3. The minimum acceptable speed on most freeways is 130 km/h. On the QE2, you are expected to match the speed of the airplanes coming in for a landing at the airport. Anything less is considered 'Wussy'.

4. Forget the traffic rules you learned elsewhere. Edmonton now has its own version of traffic rules. For example, cars/trucks with the loudest muffler go first at a four-way stop; the trucks with the biggest tires go second. However, in Southwest Edmonton, SUV-driving, cell phone-talking moms ALWAYS have the right of way.

5. If you actually stop at a yellow light, you will be rear ended and cussed out.

6. Never honk at anyone. Ever. Seriously.

7. Exception to Rule #6: If you are the 4th car back from a light that has turned green, you must honk your horn to alert the vehicle first at the intersection that the light has changed. Vehicle 2 & 3 won't shoot you as they are too busy trying to figure out how to ram the first vehicle through the intersection.

8. Road construction is permanent and continuous in Edmonton. Detour barrels are moved around during the middle of the night to make the next day's driving a bit more exciting, but nothing ever gets finished, and more construction starts every day.

9. Watch carefully for road hazards such as drunks, skunks, dogs, cats, deer, barrels, cones, cows, horses, mattresses, shredded tires, garbage, squirrels, rabbits, crows, and coyotes feeding on any of these items.

10. Calgary Trail, Gateway Boulevard, Highway 2 and the QE2 are the same road. In the same manner, Whyte Avenue, Sherwood Park Freeway and Wye Road are the same road; Wayne Gretsky Drive, Capilano, 75 Street and 66 Street are also the same road; got it?

11. If someone actually has their turn signal on, wave them to the shoulder immediately to let them know it has been 'accidentally Activated.'

12. If you are in the left lane and only driving 110 in a 80-90 km zone, you are considered a road hazard and will be 'flipped off' accordingly.

13. For winter driving, it is advisable to wear your parka, toque, fur-lined mittens and mukluks. Make sure you have a shovel, food, candle and blankets in the vehicle, as snow removal from the city streets is virtually non-existent until the spring thaw. You also may run out of gas waiting in Tim's drive thru


Not sure where that came from other than Facebook, I found it hilarious (almost 100% accurate) and hope you might too. number 10 is actually true so get ready to be confused for your first while.

This is gold. And makes me really appreciate driving against traffic when I go to and from work!

Gerard

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2016, 08:50:39 AM »
This is gold. And makes me really appreciate driving against traffic when I go to and from work!

I really really hope you mean "driving west when most people are driving east" and not "driving in the lane for oncoming traffic." :-)

KMMK

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2016, 09:55:56 AM »
"10. Calgary Trail, Gateway Boulevard, Highway 2 and the QE2 are the same road. In the same manner, Whyte Avenue, Sherwood Park Freeway and Wye Road are the same road; Wayne Gretsky Drive, Capilano, 75 Street and 66 Street are also the same road; got it?"

I totally forgot about this as I'm so used to it. Winnipeg was the same way - drove me crazy. And they forgot 103 and 104th Street (Are also Calgary Trail).  =)

Gerard

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Re: Moving to Canada and need some advice
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2016, 11:17:40 AM »
Odin, it just struck me: if you do decide to open Tangerine accounts, you'll get a bonus if someone refers you (they'll get a bonus, too). Maybe a Tangerine customer reading the thread will share their "orange key" number with you.... you input it when you're applying, and both of you get $50 or something.

(I'd give you my number, but I don't want my suggestion to appear selfishly motivated.)