Author Topic: Moving out?  (Read 1851 times)

Baldeagle721

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Moving out?
« on: March 05, 2021, 04:48:35 PM »
Hey all. When is the approximate age to move out? This year has been good to me as I finally got out of consumer debt. Started investing heavily in my retirement account and now have a good amount of money saved up. I am 26 years old will be 27 in July. I still live at home with my parents. This has helped me tremendously. My only "debt" is my lease payment and other minor living expenses. I was planning on moving out closer to my girlfriend but further from work. I have two schools of thought.

First- Be more independent and found a really nice rental deal that I can grow into. This will be a little tight budget until I hit a higher pay scale within 2 years. This will increase my living expenses and will have to pay a toll almost every day.

Second- Live-home for longer; even though I am getting older. My parents are amazing but I feel I could use the space and experience of living on my own. This will really make me save even more. Invest more into stocks and possibly save up some money for a downpayment on a house which could be a few years down the road. Want to hear some opinions on this.

Villanelle

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2021, 05:16:14 PM »
I don't think there is an age to move out.  It depends on many specifics of your situation.

Is this "rental deal"  you buying a rental, or you renting a space?  How tight is a "tight budget"?  How much is that toll and how long is the commute? 

Do your parents want you to move out?  Do you help out with expenses and chores, making you at least somewhat of an asset instead of a financial liability? 

What's your job situation? 



Baldeagle721

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2021, 05:25:55 PM »
I work for my city in a really good job. The rental deal is a rental property with all utilities and cable included for 1,350/m. The tolls would be around 6 dollars a day, the commute around 40 mins each way. My weekly take-home fluctuates, some weeks with OT is really good. I took the average take home and it is about 3k a month. My payscale is increasing for another 2.5 years. I would have around an extra 300 a month according to that "average take-home pay". My parents would let me stay for as long as I need, I give them a couple of hundred dollars a month and take care of the chores.

Steeze

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2021, 05:28:15 PM »
I vote move out, 27 is as good a time as any. I moved out at 17, so you already got a good 10 years of extra savings compared to that. I wasted a ton of money and made many terrible decisions, but I made my way. The numbers are never going to make sense when compared to living at home, but I will say that I earn and save 10x more than any of my friends that still live at home. Go for it, scrape by for a while, it is good for you. Plus you donít want to be 30 and living at home, not many people will have respect for that, even if they donít say so. Not that other peopleís opinions should matter, but still.

I know for me, thinking about my own son, I assume one way or the other he is going to be out of the house by 25. I am planning for that, I will budget for that. But 25 Iíll give him 1st/last/deposit and send him on his way if heís not on his way on his own. At least thatís how I think now, who knows when the day comes.

bbqbonelesswing

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2021, 05:41:00 PM »
Yeah, it's time to move out. Find some roommates and start packing.

MilesTeg

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2021, 05:45:11 PM »
Hey all. When is the approximate age to move out? This year has been good to me as I finally got out of consumer debt. Started investing heavily in my retirement account and now have a good amount of money saved up. I am 26 years old will be 27 in July. I still live at home with my parents. This has helped me tremendously. My only "debt" is my lease payment and other minor living expenses. I was planning on moving out closer to my girlfriend but further from work. I have two schools of thought.

First- Be more independent and found a really nice rental deal that I can grow into. This will be a little tight budget until I hit a higher pay scale within 2 years. This will increase my living expenses and will have to pay a toll almost every day.

Second- Live-home for longer; even though I am getting older. My parents are amazing but I feel I could use the space and experience of living on my own. This will really make me save even more. Invest more into stocks and possibly save up some money for a downpayment on a house which could be a few years down the road. Want to hear some opinions on this.

18? I honestly don't grok living at home that long, other than for dire financial reasons. Of course, every family is different.


Freedomin5

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2021, 06:25:37 PM »
Other than moving away for college, I lived at home until I was 26 and got married. My sisters are in their 30s and still live at home. It works for everyone involved. Mom has pleasant company in her old age. My sisters have a free, nice place to live, and their friends sometimes likes talking to mom more than they like talking to my sisters. Both my sisters have masters and are working full-time in lucrative jobs. They own a condo, which they are renting out as an investment property.

Thereís no right age to move out. Each situation is different and you should do what is right for you.

Malcat

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2021, 08:36:56 PM »
I'm really curious why you are asking this.

You're 27. Unless you are from a cultural background where it's the norm to live at home until you get married, then you are well and ripe into the age where it's normal to live on your own.

You don't seem to actually be asking when is the appropriate age to move out, you seem to be asking if it makes sense in your personal, unique situation to move out.

Well, none of us can answer that for you.
Obviously, if you are getting free rent from your parents, despite being an employee adult, then that set-up is financially superior. No question.

Whether the trade offs for you are worth it is another matter and entirely up to you.

My knee jerk reaction is get out and start living your independent life, but that's me, that's my bias as someone who does not come from a family culture where adult kids living with their parents is normal. None of stayed past 18, so in my family it would be weird, someone would have to be messed up to do that.

However, I also briefly lived with another family from a different background where they've never not had one of their adult daughters living with them. So for them it would be really messed up for an adult child to move out unless they were financially totally stable and ready to buy a home.

Different strokes for different folks. None of us can tell you what the right thing for you is.

However, from my point of view, if you are craving independence, then GTFO and suck up the fact that it's expensive because that's just part of being an adult. Stay put if you *want to*, but don't continue to be subsidized by your parents if it's not what you actually want for yourself.

Spicolli

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2021, 04:14:28 AM »
Like others have stated, that is up to you and your parents. I was in and out of my parents house until I turned 30. I didn't let any social stigma bother me too much (well, at least not until I was turning 30). It allowed me to get my career started without going into debt and it wasn't like I didn't know how to do my own laundry, make meals, and other life skills every adult should know. As a father myself now, I would allow the same for my son as long as he was working towards something, contributing with the household chores, and not getting a free ride.

BikeFanatic

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2021, 04:42:59 AM »
I think you should stay put for another year and save all that you can.
I realize there is a stigma being 27 and living at home, and it may inhibit your ability to grow as a person because you do not have the challenges others experience. But kids these day stay at home much longer than my generation either because they are broke or they are smart. I worked with a RN who made great money but lived with her parents until she got married at 30 years old. SHe stashed tons of money, paid off her loans quick, and now has a house and a husband. I feel the melinials that I worked with either got out because they could not stand their parents, or they stayed and eventually left when they were on solid finacial ground. One other younger RN wanted to move back to her parents and house share with them becasue she could barely afford her home, her student loans, her family and her husband. I think they did end up house sharing once her father retired and spent half the year in Florida.

SO do not worry how it looks, ask yourself if you have a healthy relationship with your parents and you are free to stay or go, what makes sense for you, and try not to worry about looking like a mama's boy.

Fishindude

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2021, 07:47:24 AM »
I'd say about eight years ago.
Get the heck out of there ASAP, grow up, and start doing your own thing, supporting yourself, etc.
Life is short, you are missing out on a lot living under your parents roof.

dcheesi

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2021, 07:58:39 AM »
How serious is the girlfriend situation? Sounds like you're making decisions at least in part involving her, so it's relevant to the question. Is there pressure from her about getting your own place? Is there a possibility of you two cohabiting in the near future?

Normally, one of the best arguments for moving out is having a place to 'entertain' dates etc. But if your current gf is ok with you living at home, and it isn't putting a cramp in your romantic life, then I'm not sure there's a reason to move out "just because"? And if you're anywhere close to the point in the relationship when you'd consider living together, then it might be better to work towards that rather than taking half-measures (and financially burdening yourself in the process)? (OTOH, I had tons of experience living on my own prior to living with someone, so I'm not sure if there'd be any problems created by your lack of such experience?)

Morning Glory

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2021, 08:54:18 AM »
I mostly moved out at 17 (ok I bounced back a couple times) and bought my first house at 20, but it was a VLCOL area. It is nice to have your own space, even if there is no stigma to living at home like there used to be.

I have never lived on my own. I was mostly staying with my now-husband at his mom's house, and then he moved in with me when I got the house.

I'm in a MCOL now and I know lots of people who have roommates until their 20s or 30s, sometimes even after they get married. Have you looked at sharing a 2 bedroom with a roommate? That might be cheaper and give you a better commute.

Raenia

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2021, 09:01:11 AM »
Every situation is different.  I moved out for good as soon as I graduated college, bounced around a few different roommate situations until 27, when I moved in with my then-boyfriend.  My sister had a very different trajectory - got married right out of college and moved to HI with her husband.  When they moved back to the mainland, they moved in with our dad for a year to get financially settled before moving to a rental on their own.

In general, I lean in favor of living independently.  Yes it's more expensive, but it's hard to come into your own as an adult while still living in your parents' shadow.  However, I'd see if I could find an option that didn't include such a long commute with a toll.  What is driving that particular location?  Could there be other options that still involve moving out, but don't result in such a tight budget?

Malcat

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2021, 09:09:51 AM »
Every situation is different.  I moved out for good as soon as I graduated college, bounced around a few different roommate situations until 27, when I moved in with my then-boyfriend.  My sister had a very different trajectory - got married right out of college and moved to HI with her husband.  When they moved back to the mainland, they moved in with our dad for a year to get financially settled before moving to a rental on their own.

In general, I lean in favor of living independently.  Yes it's more expensive, but it's hard to come into your own as an adult while still living in your parents' shadow.  However, I'd see if I could find an option that didn't include such a long commute with a toll.  What is driving that particular location?  Could there be other options that still involve moving out, but don't result in such a tight budget?

It really does depend on the culture though.

For some people, it's totally normal to live with family into adulthood, so there's absolutely no developmental problems. The family dynamics are structured to allow the children to grow into fully functional adults. Meanwhile, if the family structure is not designed that way, then it's more of a "failure to launch" situation and can become progressively more toxic with every passing year.

Only OP can know where they fall on this spectrum.

Overall, there's absolutely nothing wrong with living at home as an adult *IF* there's nothing wrong with it. In some family dynamics, there would be something wrong with it, in some there wouldn't.

The big question is if OP is being held back in terms of personal development and independence or if they aren't. This situation could range anywhere from perfectly healthy to deeply psychologically damaging.

It depends.

I always err on the side of concern though when someone feels the need to ask strangers on the internet about their very personal life decisions. Thay usually suggests a significant degree of internal conflict and psychological discomfort.

Baldeagle721

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2021, 02:38:20 PM »
How serious is the girlfriend situation? Sounds like you're making decisions at least in part involving her, so it's relevant to the question. Is there pressure from her about getting your own place? Is there a possibility of you two cohabiting in the near future?

Normally, one of the best arguments for moving out is having a place to 'entertain' dates etc. But if your current gf is ok with you living at home, and it isn't putting a cramp in your romantic life, then I'm not sure there's a reason to move out "just because"? And if you're anywhere close to the point in the relationship when you'd consider living together, then it might be better to work towards that rather than taking half-measures (and financially burdening yourself in the process)? (OTOH, I had tons of experience living on my own prior to living with someone, so I'm not sure if there'd be any problems created by your lack of such experience?)

We are on track to be living together in about a year. She is a little younger and getting her life together and pledged to help out with the cooking and cleaning and minor bills. She is one reason for me moving closer as I can see her more and have more of a sense of independence.


Baldeagle721

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2021, 02:42:20 PM »
Every situation is different.  I moved out for good as soon as I graduated college, bounced around a few different roommate situations until 27, when I moved in with my then-boyfriend.  My sister had a very different trajectory - got married right out of college and moved to HI with her husband.  When they moved back to the mainland, they moved in with our dad for a year to get financially settled before moving to a rental on their own.

In general, I lean in favor of living independently.  Yes it's more expensive, but it's hard to come into your own as an adult while still living in your parents' shadow.  However, I'd see if I could find an option that didn't include such a long commute with a toll.  What is driving that particular location?  Could there be other options that still involve moving out, but don't result in such a tight budget?

It really does depend on the culture though.

For some people, it's totally normal to live with family into adulthood, so there's absolutely no developmental problems. The family dynamics are structured to allow the children to grow into fully functional adults. Meanwhile, if the family structure is not designed that way, then it's more of a "failure to launch" situation and can become progressively more toxic with every passing year.

Only OP can know where they fall on this spectrum.

Overall, there's absolutely nothing wrong with living at home as an adult *IF* there's nothing wrong with it. In some family dynamics, there would be something wrong with it, in some there wouldn't.

The big question is if OP is being held back in terms of personal development and independence or if they aren't. This situation could range anywhere from perfectly healthy to deeply psychologically damaging.

It depends.

I always err on the side of concern though when someone feels the need to ask strangers on the internet about their very personal life decisions. Thay usually suggests a significant degree of internal conflict and psychological discomfort.

lol, I sometimes prefer strangers' opinions as they are unbiased and tend to not hold back. Also, this a financial forum so that is the main "internal conflict" in-between having more freedom or saving more bank. I also have Italian-American parents that would probably not mind their firstborn son living with them until they are married. They support me and my decisions either way though! My Girlfriend doesn't mind either way.

FLBiker

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2021, 06:58:36 AM »
This thread is an interesting read.  In my family, each one of the three of us basically moved out when we went to college.  I stayed for about 9 months post graduation (and I paid rent), I don't remember what my brother and sister did (as I wasn't there).  And then I stayed for ~5 months when I was 30, newly sober and moving back from China.  To be clear, my parents were very open to having us there, but they also felt like it was important for us to be grown ups (and thus pay rent).  Rent was certainly below market value (as there was no price they would have taken to have a stranger live with them).

As a parent, though, I would happily let my daughter live at home as long as she wanted if she was making good decisions (financial and otherwise).  As a sober person, I'm sensitive to enabling bad behavior, and I wouldn't let her stay with us if that were the situation.  My wife and I have even talked about having a multigenerational house (if my daughter is interested) after she's married.  It isn't our culture, but we see the value in it.  Plus, we only have one kid which I think simplifies things a little.

Like others have said, though, I think two things are true: 1) for the typical American, you're past the "normal" time to move out and 2) that isn't particularly relevant for determining what you should do in your particular situation.

dcheesi

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2021, 07:44:38 AM »
How serious is the girlfriend situation? Sounds like you're making decisions at least in part involving her, so it's relevant to the question. Is there pressure from her about getting your own place? Is there a possibility of you two cohabiting in the near future?

Normally, one of the best arguments for moving out is having a place to 'entertain' dates etc. But if your current gf is ok with you living at home, and it isn't putting a cramp in your romantic life, then I'm not sure there's a reason to move out "just because"? And if you're anywhere close to the point in the relationship when you'd consider living together, then it might be better to work towards that rather than taking half-measures (and financially burdening yourself in the process)? (OTOH, I had tons of experience living on my own prior to living with someone, so I'm not sure if there'd be any problems created by your lack of such experience?)

We are on track to be living together in about a year. She is a little younger and getting her life together and pledged to help out with the cooking and cleaning and minor bills. She is one reason for me moving closer as I can see her more and have more of a sense of independence.
Does she have her own place already? Or still at home as well?

If she has a place, then maybe you could try staying over more (and leaving the proverbial toothbrush, etc.), while keeping most of your "stuff" at home. Kind of a trial-run on living together, without a lot of pressure/commitment.

OTOH, if she's still at home, and you're in a better position to move out first, maybe think ahead to a place you might want to share down the road? That way you don't have to move multiple times if/when you decide to live together.

Log

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2021, 08:00:28 AM »
There's a jokey saying among people who partake in Buddhist meditation: "If you think you've achieved enlightenment, try spending a week with your family." I'm a little younger than you and "moved out" when I was 18 for college, but have returned for several extended periods (mostly summer breaks and most recently for five months of the pandemic), and from my experience I would say that moving away from your parents will almost certainly be worth it from the perspective of your own personal growth.

On the other hand, I'd like to echo one other person's concern about your 40!!! minute commute if you move into the place you're currently looking at. Living close to work to avoid a commute is among the greatest decisions a person can possibly make in terms of lasting improvements in happiness. Other one-time decisions might make a temporary bump in happiness, and long-term habit changes that require constant upkeep can provide lasting boosts to happiness, but moving close to work is a simple one-time decision that provides a lasting boost to well-being.

If moving closer to your girlfriend takes you further from work, but living with your girlfriend might be on the table a year from now, I would consider waiting for the year. If by waiting for her to be ready to move out, the two of you get a place close to your work, you can be closer to her and eliminate commute-suck. Of course this is irrelevant if she already has worthwhile work lined up that puts your commutes in conflict.

Or I could be reading into this relationship as much more serious than it is, and maybe the moving in together in a year is a longshot, in which case just move close to work. And so now I come to echoing everyone else: only you know the intimate details of your family dynamic and your relationship with your girlfriend that are necessary to make this decision. I would just urge you to take the negative impacts of a long commute very seriously.

slappy

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2021, 08:21:16 AM »
Are there really only those two options? Are there any less expensive places closer to work that you could rent? Why do you need a nice rental you can grow into? Why not get something you can afford for now and then move on later if you want/need to?

Villanelle

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2021, 12:40:39 PM »
Are there really only those two options? Are there any less expensive places closer to work that you could rent? Why do you need a nice rental you can grow into? Why not get something you can afford for now and then move on later if you want/need to?

That's my thought.  It seems like a very large portion of salary going to rent. (Not sure if posted salary is net or gross.)  And since OP thinks he may be moving in with GF in a year, he'd likely be moving anyway so why get a place with growing room?  And it's not even like this place is perfect because it's three doors down from their workplace.  OP, why have you zeroed in on this particular place? 

Linea_Norway

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2021, 12:25:44 AM »
Are there really only those two options? Are there any less expensive places closer to work that you could rent? Why do you need a nice rental you can grow into? Why not get something you can afford for now and then move on later if you want/need to?

That's my thought.  It seems like a very large portion of salary going to rent. (Not sure if posted salary is net or gross.)  And since OP thinks he may be moving in with GF in a year, he'd likely be moving anyway so why get a place with growing room?  And it's not even like this place is perfect because it's three doors down from their workplace.  OP, why have you zeroed in on this particular place?

I am also a bit confused. The OP wants to move closer to his GF, who still lives with her parents (from what I understand). And in a year they might move in together. Then there is no reason to move close to GF's parents for just a year.

Either stay with your parents for another year, save a lot and learn how to cook, clean and run the washing machine. Then move in with your GF, preferably close to your jobs. And don't buy or rent more than you can afford now. You can always move to a better place later.

Or just move yourself to a location that is beneficial to yourself and deal with a longer commute to your GF during the last year. Let her stay in your place from time to time (weekends, vacations) to see how that works out.

I moved out of my parent's home at 19. and moved back for a year at 20, because of circumstances. I was happy to move out again at 21. My mother needed me to give a reason for that, which I said that I needed to live closer to my study school. But I just wanted to get out anyway. DH lived at home until we moved together. He had a detached bedroom, behind the barn, which made living at home acceptable for him. I remember I was quite sceptic towards moving in with a man who had not lived alone. Would he know how to contribute in a household? He explained that he had lived on his own when his parents went on a several months long vacation.

DeniseNJ

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2021, 08:34:32 AM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.


Malcat

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2021, 08:39:33 AM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

robartsd

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2021, 09:05:11 AM »
Are there really only those two options? Are there any less expensive places closer to work that you could rent? Why do you need a nice rental you can grow into? Why not get something you can afford for now and then move on later if you want/need to?

That's my thought.  It seems like a very large portion of salary going to rent. (Not sure if posted salary is net or gross.)  And since OP thinks he may be moving in with GF in a year, he'd likely be moving anyway so why get a place with growing room?  And it's not even like this place is perfect because it's three doors down from their workplace.  OP, why have you zeroed in on this particular place?
If I were managing a property, I'd be hesitant to rent to someone without rental history and rent to income ratio so high. Of course, I have no idea what your particular rental market is like.

I'd continue living at home for now but be looking for something better suited to your current income.

slappy

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2021, 09:43:42 AM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

dougules

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #27 on: March 10, 2021, 10:24:54 AM »
Are you willing to give specific numbers?  I think some of it depends on what you mean by "tight." 

Jouer

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #28 on: March 10, 2021, 11:08:29 AM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Yes, this!

For the sake of your GF, learn to be away from parents before moving in with her. Make some mistakes on your own or better yet get a roommate and use them as a guinea pig on what bugs people, etc.

Malcat

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2021, 11:33:37 AM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

robartsd

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2021, 11:52:37 AM »
Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.
$0.25/packet (for a case) is about the lowest price you I've seen (more often I see about $0.33/packet). Sold individually sometimes see it as high as $1/packet. This is for the packets with a brick of dry noodles and a small foil packet of seasoning. The versions that include freeze dried vegetables cost significantly more.

slappy

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2021, 12:01:49 PM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

12 pack of ramen, $2.27 in my area

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Maruchan-Ramen-Chicken-Flavor-12-ct-3-oz/10450904

I tend to think of cup o noodles when I think ramen, but those are a little more. Apparently they are .37 in my area.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Maruchan-Instant-Lunch-Chicken-Flavor-Instant-Lunch-2-25-oz/10450893


Villanelle

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2021, 03:33:09 PM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

For dried, packaged Ramen??  Like this?  Similar products, in small bulk (~24 packages) on Amazon (so surely not the cheapest) are $.66 USD.  And larger quantities are cheaper, as, likely are brick and mortar stores, and you can get it even cheaper with subscribe and save. 

Certainly there is far more expensive (and better) ramen on the market, and throwing in a handful of frozen veggies improves both the experience and the nutrition, but this is great food to have in the rotation for poor people, especially those without time, resources, or knowledge to cook. 


englishteacheralex

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2021, 03:43:37 PM »
Packaged ramen is really bad for you, so you'll pay for the food in health instead of money. Typically I'll make it with a hard boiled egg, a lot of veggies, and then my own broth or stock.

Malcat

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2021, 03:55:29 PM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

For dried, packaged Ramen??  Like this?  Similar products, in small bulk (~24 packages) on Amazon (so surely not the cheapest) are $.66 USD.  And larger quantities are cheaper, as, likely are brick and mortar stores, and you can get it even cheaper with subscribe and save. 

Certainly there is far more expensive (and better) ramen on the market, and throwing in a handful of frozen veggies improves both the experience and the nutrition, but this is great food to have in the rotation for poor people, especially those without time, resources, or knowledge to cook. 



I've never bought ramen, so I was thinking of this
https://www.loblaws.ca/Food/Pantry/Pasta%2C-Rice-%26-Beans/Noodles/Nong-Shim-Neoguri-Meal-Noodles/p/20866212_EA?navid=

dcheesi

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #35 on: March 10, 2021, 04:08:53 PM »
For ramen, there's wide variety of prices depending on the brand etc. Maruchan is generally the cheapest, <$0.25 each and even cheaper by the case, and I assume that's the proverbial college student staple. On the high end, some Samyang ramen goes for well over $1 per item ($6-7 / 5-pack around here).

I'm not sure what the difference is, besides the content of the flavor packets? The actual ramen noodles themselves don't seem that different (then again IANA Ramen/Noodle enthusiast).

Either way, you really need to add some sort of protein (e.g. egg) to make it a well rounded meal. "Real" ramen dishes in restaurants include that and a whole lot more, of course.

SimpleCycle

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #36 on: March 10, 2021, 06:22:18 PM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

For dried, packaged Ramen??  Like this?  Similar products, in small bulk (~24 packages) on Amazon (so surely not the cheapest) are $.66 USD.  And larger quantities are cheaper, as, likely are brick and mortar stores, and you can get it even cheaper with subscribe and save. 

Certainly there is far more expensive (and better) ramen on the market, and throwing in a handful of frozen veggies improves both the experience and the nutrition, but this is great food to have in the rotation for poor people, especially those without time, resources, or knowledge to cook. 



I've never bought ramen, so I was thinking of this
https://www.loblaws.ca/Food/Pantry/Pasta%2C-Rice-%26-Beans/Noodles/Nong-Shim-Neoguri-Meal-Noodles/p/20866212_EA?navid=

That's showing a 4 pack for $5.

Here I can get American brands of ramen for 20 cents a package.  It's not a terrible meal (unless you're on a sodium restricted diet) when you add an egg and some frozen veggies.

Malcat

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #37 on: March 10, 2021, 07:13:16 PM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

For dried, packaged Ramen??  Like this?  Similar products, in small bulk (~24 packages) on Amazon (so surely not the cheapest) are $.66 USD.  And larger quantities are cheaper, as, likely are brick and mortar stores, and you can get it even cheaper with subscribe and save. 

Certainly there is far more expensive (and better) ramen on the market, and throwing in a handful of frozen veggies improves both the experience and the nutrition, but this is great food to have in the rotation for poor people, especially those without time, resources, or knowledge to cook. 



I've never bought ramen, so I was thinking of this
https://www.loblaws.ca/Food/Pantry/Pasta%2C-Rice-%26-Beans/Noodles/Nong-Shim-Neoguri-Meal-Noodles/p/20866212_EA?navid=

That's showing a 4 pack for $5.

Here I can get American brands of ramen for 20 cents a package.  It's not a terrible meal (unless you're on a sodium restricted diet) when you add an egg and some frozen veggies.

Lol, oops.

DeniseNJ

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #38 on: March 11, 2021, 06:48:48 AM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

For dried, packaged Ramen??  Like this?  Similar products, in small bulk (~24 packages) on Amazon (so surely not the cheapest) are $.66 USD.  And larger quantities are cheaper, as, likely are brick and mortar stores, and you can get it even cheaper with subscribe and save. 

Certainly there is far more expensive (and better) ramen on the market, and throwing in a handful of frozen veggies improves both the experience and the nutrition, but this is great food to have in the rotation for poor people, especially those without time, resources, or knowledge to cook. 



I've never bought ramen, so I was thinking of this
https://www.loblaws.ca/Food/Pantry/Pasta%2C-Rice-%26-Beans/Noodles/Nong-Shim-Neoguri-Meal-Noodles/p/20866212_EA?navid=

That's showing a 4 pack for $5.

Here I can get American brands of ramen for 20 cents a package.  It's not a terrible meal (unless you're on a sodium restricted diet) when you add an egg and some frozen veggies.

Lol, oops.

Oh, good grief! lol. My point was that you need to learn to be ok on your own. To stand in Ikea and think, "Should I buy the cheap chair at 20 bucks or the 30 dollar one I actually like? Or just get the heck outta here and go to a thrift store?" You think rent will be tight. But you might have to decide between eating rice and beans every day for a week and buying curtains. And you'll have towels as curtains until your last clean towel. Living with parents you don't have to make these real financial choices so it's easy to be doing well. Living on your own means there's no aspirin if you didn't buy it bc it doesn't just show up in the medicine cabinet. You get to decide how much you value name brand stuff and what you're willing to buy at the dollar store.

Move out. It'll be good for you.

Villanelle

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #39 on: March 11, 2021, 05:32:46 PM »
You're in a good financial situation because you are living with your parents. I think you need to learn to be in a good financial situation on your own. Move out, into a cheap apt. and be poor. It'll be good for you to learn to do without in order to save. Move very very close to work. If in a year you want to move in with gf then you can re-evaluate based on each of your commutes. Do not move 40 min from work. Big mistake. Move close to work and learn to like ramen.

Is ramen actually cheap? I always wonder, because it seems way more expensive than say, rice and beans.

I think it is very cheap. Also, not every knows how to cook, especially if they are in poverty, so in that case, ramen could be the better choice. I think it's maybe 25 cents for a package.

Wow, it's definitely not that cheap here, it's $3-4/serving. Good to know, I was always wondering why "ramen" was the go to for cheap food on American TV shows.

For dried, packaged Ramen??  Like this?  Similar products, in small bulk (~24 packages) on Amazon (so surely not the cheapest) are $.66 USD.  And larger quantities are cheaper, as, likely are brick and mortar stores, and you can get it even cheaper with subscribe and save. 

Certainly there is far more expensive (and better) ramen on the market, and throwing in a handful of frozen veggies improves both the experience and the nutrition, but this is great food to have in the rotation for poor people, especially those without time, resources, or knowledge to cook. 



I've never bought ramen, so I was thinking of this
https://www.loblaws.ca/Food/Pantry/Pasta%2C-Rice-%26-Beans/Noodles/Nong-Shim-Neoguri-Meal-Noodles/p/20866212_EA?navid=

That's showing a 4 pack for $5.

Here I can get American brands of ramen for 20 cents a package.  It's not a terrible meal (unless you're on a sodium restricted diet) when you add an egg and some frozen veggies.
Yes, I used the sample picture because it was a single pack, but the bundle of 24 of a different brand is $.66/.  Note please that I said "similar products" were $.66.

Morning Glory

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Re: Moving out?
« Reply #40 on: March 11, 2021, 06:57:39 PM »
I used to eat lipton flavored rice with frozen veggies almost every day. Yes I know real rice is cheaper, but lipton was faster and I was working full time and going to school too. They used to go on sale for .50. Ramen was .25 at the time but not as filling for the calories.   Just thinking about it makes me tired. I did learn to cook once I got more free time. You can too.