Author Topic: Graduated College but can't find work/Almost homeless  (Read 93816 times)

Rimu05

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Re: Graduated College but can't find work/Almost homeless
« Reply #200 on: December 26, 2018, 10:47:41 AM »
Edit: Congrats OP. I misread the dates on it, but seems like it worked out. I graduated in 2014 and wasn't in a dire situation but did move to a different state where I crashed with my mom for a few months. I took a call center job and applied to jobs like crazy. In the end, I was networked into where I currently work. So far, not a high earner but living decently.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2018, 10:54:42 AM by Rimu05 »

Nicholas Carter

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Re: Graduated College but can't find work/Almost homeless
« Reply #201 on: December 26, 2018, 01:32:40 PM »
I don't want to be difficult, but I find it hard to believe that... McDonald's won't hire you unless there's something you're leaving out. It's hideous work but it's work and you need to keep being able to pay the fleabag motel bill.
I have been told, to my face, in job interviews at a game store, "Your qualifications make it obvious that your just in here to tide over the summer, and when the teaching contracts come out in August you'll be gone." I can imagine a McDonald's using the same logic.

ChpBstrd

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Re: Graduated College but can't find work/Almost homeless
« Reply #202 on: December 27, 2018, 08:56:56 AM »
I don't want to be difficult, but I find it hard to believe that... McDonald's won't hire you unless there's something you're leaving out. It's hideous work but it's work and you need to keep being able to pay the fleabag motel bill.
I have been told, to my face, in job interviews at a game store, "Your qualifications make it obvious that your just in here to tide over the summer, and when the teaching contracts come out in August you'll be gone." I can imagine a McDonald's using the same logic.

I wonder if such employers ever back-test their prediction model. Why would a person's best option today not also be their best option six months from now? Does one become more employable as one spends more time underemployed?

Second, is it really a good hiring policy to only hire people who one perceives to have already reached their maximum potential at a relatively low level? That's like the employer saying "we strive to hire only the best mediocre employees!" Even if they stick around 10 years, you've built a company around people who, in the employer's theory, are already "maxed out" and unable to take on additional responsibility. Perhaps the managers are protecting their own jobs from internal competition?

Here's an alternative option: If the learning curve isn't too steep, hire ambitious people you know will move on. Promise them a glowing letter of recommendation if they kick ass at your company. Do a lot of hiring, yes, but get growth potential in return. Mentor your own potential future replacements so you can move up in the organization or expand the business.

electriceagle

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Re: Graduated College but can't find work/Almost homeless
« Reply #203 on: December 29, 2018, 04:20:43 AM »
I don't want to be difficult, but I find it hard to believe that... McDonald's won't hire you unless there's something you're leaving out. It's hideous work but it's work and you need to keep being able to pay the fleabag motel bill.
I have been told, to my face, in job interviews at a game store, "Your qualifications make it obvious that your just in here to tide over the summer, and when the teaching contracts come out in August you'll be gone." I can imagine a McDonald's using the same logic.

I wonder if such employers ever back-test their prediction model. Why would a person's best option today not also be their best option six months from now? Does one become more employable as one spends more time underemployed?

Second, is it really a good hiring policy to only hire people who one perceives to have already reached their maximum potential at a relatively low level? That's like the employer saying "we strive to hire only the best mediocre employees!" Even if they stick around 10 years, you've built a company around people who, in the employer's theory, are already "maxed out" and unable to take on additional responsibility. Perhaps the managers are protecting their own jobs from internal competition?

Here's an alternative option: If the learning curve isn't too steep, hire ambitious people you know will move on. Promise them a glowing letter of recommendation if they kick ass at your company. Do a lot of hiring, yes, but get growth potential in return. Mentor your own potential future replacements so you can move up in the organization or expand the business.

Consider that the person doing the hiring is working at the McJob as well.

They probably don't feel great about watching a stream of people with better prospects come in, work for 4 months, and then leave for somewhere nicer while they stay at the McJob.

ChpBstrd

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Re: Graduated College but can't find work/Almost homeless
« Reply #204 on: December 31, 2018, 10:31:32 AM »
I don't want to be difficult, but I find it hard to believe that... McDonald's won't hire you unless there's something you're leaving out. It's hideous work but it's work and you need to keep being able to pay the fleabag motel bill.
I have been told, to my face, in job interviews at a game store, "Your qualifications make it obvious that your just in here to tide over the summer, and when the teaching contracts come out in August you'll be gone." I can imagine a McDonald's using the same logic.

I wonder if such employers ever back-test their prediction model. Why would a person's best option today not also be their best option six months from now? Does one become more employable as one spends more time underemployed?

Second, is it really a good hiring policy to only hire people who one perceives to have already reached their maximum potential at a relatively low level? That's like the employer saying "we strive to hire only the best mediocre employees!" Even if they stick around 10 years, you've built a company around people who, in the employer's theory, are already "maxed out" and unable to take on additional responsibility. Perhaps the managers are protecting their own jobs from internal competition?

Here's an alternative option: If the learning curve isn't too steep, hire ambitious people you know will move on. Promise them a glowing letter of recommendation if they kick ass at your company. Do a lot of hiring, yes, but get growth potential in return. Mentor your own potential future replacements so you can move up in the organization or expand the business.

Consider that the person doing the hiring is working at the McJob as well.

They probably don't feel great about watching a stream of people with better prospects come in, work for 4 months, and then leave for somewhere nicer while they stay at the McJob.
...and maybe their vision of success involves assembling a team of serfs to permanently labor for their benefit. If it comes to managing such a person's emotions, one might have to leave some credentials off the application.