Author Topic: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement  (Read 27502 times)

kmb501

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Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« on: October 02, 2016, 03:48:17 PM »
Today, I turned thirty. I've been working full-time for about $20,000 per year for one full year, and I've been finding a way to spend most of what I make. My monthly expenses are roughly:

$550 rent (they went up)
$150 gas (gas went up, too)
$35 internet
$40 cell phone
$200 charitable giving (this is something I feel like I have to do)
$300 (roughly) toward additional training and college courses. I'm going back to school for a math or computer science certification so that jobs will be easier to come by.
$200 (roughly) toward miscellaneous purchases, like groceries and clothing.
$200 car repairs (it doesn't happen every month but the car has acted up, and I need the car so I had to get it fixed)

As you can see, I spend pretty much all of my monthly salary. I don't want to continue like this, and I'm not making excuses, but I do feel like I need to find a better job so that I can save more money. What are your suggestions?

I've thought of a few things:

Try to find some quick training that doesn't involve a lot of school. I actually don't know where to look. My first thought would be a junior college, but they cost money too.

Save up the down payment on a house and rent out rooms (becoming a landlord is pretty risky)

Come up with a good side hustle, like private tutoring (I'm at that stage where I know what I'm teaching but not exactly how to teach it. I really feel like I wouldn't stack up against the competition unless I was teaching little kids.)

Get a group together and learn a foreign language and some programming code online for free (I don't like studying this kind of stuff on my own, because I have tendency to get distracted or to tell myself that it isn't worth it.)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2016, 03:50:39 PM by kmb501 »

swick

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2016, 03:56:19 PM »
Happy Birthday!

You don't really provide us enough information to give you any suggestions.

What is your current job? What education do you have? What are your strengths/skills and areas of interest?

If you are working full time for 20,000 a year, you are VASTLY underemployed. That is poverty level in many places. 

What did you do/experience/learn in your 20's that will allow you to earn a higher income now?


kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2016, 04:15:10 PM »
Happy Birthday!

You don't really provide us enough information to give you any suggestions.

What is your current job? What education do you have? What are your strengths/skills and areas of interest?

If you are working full time for 20,000 a year, you are VASTLY underemployed. That is poverty level in many places. 

What did you do/experience/learn in your 20's that will allow you to earn a higher income now?

My current job is teaching. I teach ESL in the evening part-time and regular education during the day.

I have a master's in Education and a bachelor's in English.

I worked as a substitute teacher and volunteer tutor until I finally landed a job.

swick

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2016, 04:20:06 PM »
My first suggestion would be to check out teacher pay teacher. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/

I have several friends who are making very good money by selling their lessons online. If you are already creating the lessons to teach, you may as well be making some extra money on them!

Also, you may want to look at teaching overseas. Way better money and would be a fantastic adventure to kick of your 30's :)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2016, 04:21:47 PM by swick »

westtoeast

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2016, 04:34:07 PM »
Where in the country are you located, and are you willing to move? If you have a Masters in Ed then you can earn at LEAST double your current salary in many places in the country-- worth it, even with the higher cost of living, especially if you are willing to rent just a room in a house. I would suggest the northwest or midwest as higher paying regions to check out.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2016, 04:35:55 PM »
I'm definitely willing to relocate if it means better pay. I would like more information.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2016, 04:41:42 PM »
My first suggestion would be to check out teacher pay teacher. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/

I have several friends who are making very good money by selling their lessons online. If you are already creating the lessons to teach, you may as well be making some extra money on them!

Also, you may want to look at teaching overseas. Way better money and would be a fantastic adventure to kick of your 30's :)

The TPT idea is good, but I can't really think of a completely original idea yet. Most of the stuff I use is free from the internet.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2016, 04:43:32 PM »
My first suggestion would be to check out teacher pay teacher. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/

I have several friends who are making very good money by selling their lessons online. If you are already creating the lessons to teach, you may as well be making some extra money on them!

Also, you may want to look at teaching overseas. Way better money and would be a fantastic adventure to kick of your 30's :)

The TPT idea is good, but I can't really think of a completely original idea yet. Most of the stuff I use is free from the internet.

I'm all ears for teaching overseas, but I need to do research first and make sure I would be welcome (a lot of American teachers are already working there. They treat the teachers with respect. It's a welcoming climate. They give the teachers a little training and mentoring, etc.)

swick

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2016, 04:59:08 PM »
My first suggestion would be to check out teacher pay teacher. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/

I have several friends who are making very good money by selling their lessons online. If you are already creating the lessons to teach, you may as well be making some extra money on them!

Also, you may want to look at teaching overseas. Way better money and would be a fantastic adventure to kick of your 30's :)

The TPT idea is good, but I can't really think of a completely original idea yet. Most of the stuff I use is free from the internet.

I'm all ears for teaching overseas, but I need to do research first and make sure I would be welcome (a lot of American teachers are already working there. They treat the teachers with respect. It's a welcoming climate. They give the teachers a little training and mentoring, etc.)

With the shifts in education and technology, you can't expect anyone to make your job easier for you and hand you the experience and support. You have to be a self-starter and invest the time to learning how to create your own curriculum and get more experience teaching - finding your unique style and voice. If you are teaching ESL during the evenings, this is a PERFECT testing ground for you.

With having your masters you can get into many countries that don't allow casual ESL teachers (I'm thinking specifically S. Korea and Japan)

You also have boundless options in areas surrounding and supporting education - TPT, Curriculum design, teaching online courses, offering online/skype ESL lessons...there are so many options out there - but there are no quick fixes, you still have to put in the time to learning your craft.


Lski'stash

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2016, 05:07:38 PM »
My first suggestion would be to check out teacher pay teacher. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/

I have several friends who are making very good money by selling their lessons online. If you are already creating the lessons to teach, you may as well be making some extra money on them!

Also, you may want to look at teaching overseas. Way better money and would be a fantastic adventure to kick of your 30's :)

You have a Master's degree in ESL education and only make $20,000? My suggestion to you is this: MOVE. Somewhere that pays a whole lot better. Like, for example, to Michigan, where the pay is better, and your skill set will be picked up right away. I also feel like you should be able to find a tutoring gig fairly quickly. I usually charge $25 an hour, and I can be very picky about the students I take on for tutoring.


Roland of Gilead

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2016, 05:11:24 PM »
Fuck, if 30 is midlife, I feel really old now at 46.

I thought 40 was midlife.  30 is barely out of mom's basement.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2016, 05:41:47 PM »
If 30 is midlife, I feel really old now at 46.

I thought 40 was midlife.  30 is barely out of mom's basement.

Okay, so maybe it's a pre-mid-life crisis, maybe a third-life crisis? I don't know the proper terminology. All I know is women are said to get less and less to work for them after they reach this point unless they already have a pretty good career started, they're armed to the teeth with STEM training, or they have a sizable trust fund and don't need to worry about working. They say forty is too old to try to start another career. Of course, I don't know how true any of that is.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2016, 05:44:29 PM by kmb501 »

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2016, 05:43:03 PM »
Wha... two degrees, one of them in education, and you can only find $20,000? I hear Las Vegas is always desperate for teachers. You can probably get several times that amount plus a signing bonus.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2016, 05:46:56 PM »
Wha... two degrees, one of them in education, and you can only find $20,000? I hear Las Vegas is always desperate for teachers. You can probably get several times that amount plus a signing bonus.

Maybe I just don't know how to apply? I signed up on their website, but they called me for some position I wasn't qualified for.

I don't know if getting diagnosed with ASD is part of not really being a confident "self-starter" or not, but I do feel like I could be a more competent communicator now than I was in my twenties. I don't really know where to go from here, though.

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2016, 06:07:31 PM »
If 30 is midlife, I feel really old now at 46.

I thought 40 was midlife.  30 is barely out of mom's basement.

Okay, so maybe it's a pre-mid-life crisis, maybe a third-life crisis? I don't know the proper terminology. All I know is women are said to get less and less to work for them after they reach this point unless they already have a pretty good career started, they're armed to the teeth with STEM training, or they have a sizable trust fund and don't need to worry about working. They say forty is too old to try to start another career. Of course, I don't know how true any of that is.

Welcome back, kmb501.

Please, stop listening to whoever is feeding you this self-defeating load of BS.  Even (or maybe especially) if it is yourself.  I don't want to go all woo woo on you, but seriously, this stuff becomes the truth for you if you keep repeating it, and IT IS NOT TRUE!!!!!  Get scrubbyfish's book and work on learning to advocate for yourself/present yourself better in job application situations.  You have useful skills and are reasaonably articulate.  But follow through seems to be an issue.  Again, largely it seems because of the self-defeating stories you are telling yourself.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2016, 06:55:14 PM »
You are incredibly, inexcusably underpaid.
A few useful links:

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-overcome-your-quarter-life-crisis-1782670670
http://allgroanup.com/adult/25-signs-quarter-life-crisis/
http://www.forbes.com/sites/julesschroeder/2016/09/08/millennials-this-is-what-your-quarter-life-crisis-is-telling-you/#696c49347d7d
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/07/25/50-jobs-over-50000-without-a-degree-part-1/
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/08/05/50-jobs-over-50000-without-a-degree-part-2/

I also recommend reading Tim Ferriss, the Four Hour Work Week, and Joseph Canfield, The Success Principles. I've also heard great things about Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office by Frankel.

Hmmm...is there a way to become an electrician while holding a full-time job as a teacher? Is there a heavy math or memorization requirement? If so, count me out. I'm not that good at those kinds of tasks.

pbkmaine

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2016, 06:59:41 PM »
Kmb501, have you ever thought of teaching people with ASD? Being on the spectrum yourself, you are uniquely suited to understand and help them.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2016, 07:03:37 PM »
My first suggestion would be to check out teacher pay teacher. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/

I have several friends who are making very good money by selling their lessons online. If you are already creating the lessons to teach, you may as well be making some extra money on them!

Also, you may want to look at teaching overseas. Way better money and would be a fantastic adventure to kick of your 30's :)

The TPT idea is good, but I can't really think of a completely original idea yet. Most of the stuff I use is free from the internet.

I'm all ears for teaching overseas, but I need to do research first and make sure I would be welcome (a lot of American teachers are already working there. They treat the teachers with respect. It's a welcoming climate. They give the teachers a little training and mentoring, etc.)

With the shifts in education and technology, you can't expect anyone to make your job easier for you and hand you the experience and support. You have to be a self-starter and invest the time to learning how to create your own curriculum and get more experience teaching - finding your unique style and voice. If you are teaching ESL during the evenings, this is a PERFECT testing ground for you.

With having your masters you can get into many countries that don't allow casual ESL teachers (I'm thinking specifically S. Korea and Japan)

You also have boundless options in areas surrounding and supporting education - TPT, Curriculum design, teaching online courses, offering online/skype ESL lessons...there are so many options out there - but there are no quick fixes, you still have to put in the time to learning your craft.

Yeah...but it would have been nice had they at least prevented me from having to reinvent the wheel. Giving me clay, rocks, and sand and asking me to make concrete would have predictable results, but that's the way it's been at every place at which I've worked and student taught! I was expected to "already know" the information. I wish I would have known what I know now. I could have stood up and told my cooperating teacher point-blank, "No, I don't know this. Is anyone willing to teach it to me?" Instead, though, I accepted that I "should have known how to teach" (even though no one taught me) and floundered during student teaching. 

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2016, 07:07:35 PM »
Kmb501, have you ever thought of teaching people with ASD? Being on the spectrum yourself, you are uniquely suited to understand and help them.

I've thought about it, but I don't know how much help I would be. Plus, to my knowledge, without medical certification, there isn't a profession where I would only be working with people with ASD. If I went into special education, for instance, my list of students would include those on the spectrum, those suffering from traditional autism, those with Downs Syndrome, and those with various other physical and mental disabilities. Also, I think I should take into consideration that people with ASD aren't good natural communicators. I might have trouble modeling social pragmatics and other vital non-verbal skills. Of course, I would probably believe in my students, more than I can say for some of the teachers down here. Why, during student teaching, I overheard a teacher tell another that a certain student would probably not "ever be able to do anything for himself" because he had high functioning autism. My heart sank when I heard that, and of course it made me feel like hiding my own struggles with the disorder to avoid this teacher casting a negative opinion upon me and hurting my evaluations.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2016, 07:10:36 PM by kmb501 »

Gronnie

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2016, 07:57:58 PM »
You need to move, like yesterday. Masters in Education and making the equivalent of ~$10/hour? In my midwest, average cost of living city the local McDonald's starts high school kids out at about that. Costco and Aldi pay cashier's like $15/hour.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2016, 08:12:41 PM »
You need to move, like yesterday. Masters in Education and making the equivalent of ~$10/hour? In my midwest, average cost of living city the local McDonald's starts high school kids out at about that. Costco and Aldi pay cashier's like $15/hour.

I would love to move or find a better paying job, one or the other.

Cyanne

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2016, 08:30:24 PM »
Kmb501, have you ever thought of teaching people with ASD? Being on the spectrum yourself, you are uniquely suited to understand and help them.

I've thought about it, but I don't know how much help I would be. Plus, to my knowledge, without medical certification, there isn't a profession where I would only be working with people with ASD. If I went into special education, for instance, my list of students would include those on the spectrum, those suffering from traditional autism, those with Downs Syndrome, and those with various other physical and mental disabilities. Also, I think I should take into consideration that people with ASD aren't good natural communicators. I might have trouble modeling social pragmatics and other vital non-verbal skills. Of course, I would probably believe in my students, more than I can say for some of the teachers down here. Why, during student teaching, I overheard a teacher tell another that a certain student would probably not "ever be able to do anything for himself" because he had high functioning autism. My heart sank when I heard that, and of course it made me feel like hiding my own struggles with the disorder to avoid this teacher casting a negative opinion upon me and hurting my evaluations.

There are various licenses in special education as well as different jobs in special education. There are positions that specialize in autism student or developmentally delayed students or emotional behavior disorder students. It really depends on which licenses you hold since there are different license areas in special education.


edited to remove personal info
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 10:02:12 AM by Cyanne »

With This Herring

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2016, 08:44:09 PM »
You can look at information provided by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics to see which states pay teachers more.

http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/map_changer.htm
Major occupational group:  Education, Training, and Library
Occupation:  [I'm not sure which one best fits ESL]
Measure:  Annual mean wage by state OR Annual mean wage by MSA (Metropolitan Statistical Area)

Table of wages for education (as paid by local government) by state
You can change the parameters for the above using this page:  http://data.bls.gov/cew/apps/data_views/data_views.htm#tab=Tables

A good general source for starting hunts on wage info: http://www.bls.gov/bls/blswage.htm

You will have to do your own research, but you can find better pay.

NV Teacher

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2016, 09:01:15 PM »
Wha... two degrees, one of them in education, and you can only find $20,000? I hear Las Vegas is always desperate for teachers. You can probably get several times that amount plus a signing bonus.
Come to Las Vegas.  Starting salary for a teacher with a BS degree is a little over $40,000 a year.  We have a new salary schedule this year so I'm not sure what you would make with a MS.  The district is still hiring because we still have hundreds of open positions.  Might be worth checking out.

meandmyfamily

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2016, 09:15:13 PM »
Come to Arizona and double your salary!!!

Physicsteacher

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2016, 09:18:04 PM »
You are incredibly, inexcusably underpaid.
A few useful links:

http://lifehacker.com/how-to-overcome-your-quarter-life-crisis-1782670670
http://allgroanup.com/adult/25-signs-quarter-life-crisis/
http://www.forbes.com/sites/julesschroeder/2016/09/08/millennials-this-is-what-your-quarter-life-crisis-is-telling-you/#696c49347d7d
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/07/25/50-jobs-over-50000-without-a-degree-part-1/
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/08/05/50-jobs-over-50000-without-a-degree-part-2/

I also recommend reading Tim Ferriss, the Four Hour Work Week, and Joseph Canfield, The Success Principles. I've also heard great things about Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office by Frankel.

Hmmm...is there a way to become an electrician while holding a full-time job as a teacher? Is there a heavy math or memorization requirement? If so, count me out. I'm not that good at those kinds of tasks.

In Arkansas, becoming an electrician is an apprenticeship program. It would not be compatible with teaching, but you would work full time as an apprentice while going to classes one night a week for four years. First year apprentices at my husband's company make $10/hour. The exam to become a journeyman at the end of the four years is open book; you are required to bring your copy of the National Electric Code with you. You would need solid arithmetic skills, some geometry, and to be comfortable with algebraic formulas. You would also need to be ready to work outdoors in all weather conditions and lift 50 lbs.

nancy33

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #27 on: October 02, 2016, 10:23:11 PM »
https://jobs.ca.gov/Public/Bulletin.aspx?examCD=2CEBT

You might be able to make 90 K in CA if you are willing to work in a prison!

Gronnie

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #28 on: October 02, 2016, 10:25:34 PM »
https://jobs.ca.gov/Public/Bulletin.aspx?examCD=2CEBT

You might be able to make 90 K in CA if you are willing to work in a prison!

Am I missing something? That link says $4000-$5000 a month salary range (ie $48k-$60k annually).

arebelspy

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2016, 03:29:15 AM »
Another thread on the same thing?

Why?

Haven't we answered this enough? 

This thread has all the same suggestions as the last few, down to the exact idea of teaching in Vegas.

Is this some really subtle long term troll job?

You couldn't be bothered with anyone's suggestions last time. Or the time before. Or the time before that.

Why should I think you'll bother this time?  How long until your next thread with the exact same question, where you reply, but basically ignore all the responses, and then repost the same thread later?  3 months?  Six months?

My suggestion, as has been said numerous times in the other thread for issues only hinted at here is therapy.

At the very least, read Scrubby's book.  But it doesn't seem like you actually WANT to change anything.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
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kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #30 on: October 03, 2016, 04:23:55 AM »
Another thread on the same thing?

Why?

Haven't we answered this enough? 

This thread has all the same suggestions as the last few, down to the exact idea of teaching in Vegas.

Is this some really subtle long term troll job?

You couldn't be bothered with anyone's suggestions last time. Or the time before. Or the time before that.

Why should I think you'll bother this time?  How long until your next thread with the exact same question, where you reply, but basically ignore all the responses, and then repost the same thread later?  3 months?  Six months?

My suggestion, as has been said numerous times in the other thread for issues only hinted at here is therapy.

At the very least, read Scrubby's book.  But it doesn't seem like you actually WANT to change anything.

Sorry, I guess I should have revived an old thread instead of starting a new one. I apologize for constantly posting the same information, but I'm stuck. Why am I stuck, though? Good question. I think I need to work on figuring that out. That might be a good first step.

I know that in the past, maybe not right now, but in the past, I was very reluctant to approach people in person or even call them on the phone, because I felt like I wouldn't know what to say. I think that might be one thing that is holding me back. I guess there's no cure for shyness except just doing what makes us afraid.  Thank you all for the suggestions. I think I'm going to try something at least.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2016, 04:30:07 AM by kmb501 »

Villanelle

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #31 on: October 03, 2016, 05:04:38 AM »
You need to DO SOMETHING.  This isn't going to happen to you.  And you don't have to analyze every possibility and find the very best one.  That's not plausible.  You need to find a good option, and go with it. 

Does the Southwest appeal to you at all?  Vegas and Arizona have nth been presented as good options.  What do you look for or lil win a hometown?  If those areas seem like they'd work for you, then I'd say it's time to stop looking and start applying.  If your phone anxiety is that bad, consider practicing with a friend for likely questions that will come up.  But really, most applying can be done online.  When you get hired, you rent a truck with the things you can't live without (or better yet cram them in your car).  Find a VRBO room to stay in until you can find a more permanent living arrangement.  And get to work getting to know your hometown.  Don't let all of that overwhelm you.  I only lay it out to show you that moving to a new place is not as awful or difficult as it may seem.  But for now, all you have to do is pick 2-3 areas that seem like a good fit for you, and start applying.

In the mean time, consider applying at tutor.com for some additional side cash. 

Now go!!! Do it.  Make it a goal to choose your areas by Friday (or just go with Vegas and AZ, if those seem like a good fit) and then apply to at least 3 districts by the end of next week, and three more the following week.  Go!

arebelspy

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #32 on: October 03, 2016, 05:13:56 AM »
Sorry, I guess I should have revived an old thread instead of starting a new one. I apologize for constantly posting the same information, but I'm stuck. Why am I stuck, though? Good question. I think I need to work on figuring that out. That might be a good first step.

I know that in the past, maybe not right now, but in the past, I was very reluctant to approach people in person or even call them on the phone, because I felt like I wouldn't know what to say. I think that might be one thing that is holding me back. I guess there's no cure for shyness except just doing what makes us afraid.  Thank you all for the suggestions. I think I'm going to try something at least.

It can be tough breaking out of your comfort zone.  Before you were scared of teaching overseas, now you didn't mention that.  Did you get over that?

Several people have offered suggestions around finding a better place to teach.

Are you willing to relocate/move?  Or not, and if not, why not?
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #33 on: October 03, 2016, 05:27:20 AM »
You need to DO SOMETHING.  This isn't going to happen to you.  And you don't have to analyze every possibility and find the very best one.  That's not plausible.  You need to find a good option, and go with it. 

Does the Southwest appeal to you at all?  Vegas and Arizona have nth been presented as good options.  What do you look for or lil win a hometown?  If those areas seem like they'd work for you, then I'd say it's time to stop looking and start applying.  If your phone anxiety is that bad, consider practicing with a friend for likely questions that will come up.  But really, most applying can be done online.  When you get hired, you rent a truck with the things you can't live without (or better yet cram them in your car).  Find a VRBO room to stay in until you can find a more permanent living arrangement.  And get to work getting to know your hometown.  Don't let all of that overwhelm you.  I only lay it out to show you that moving to a new place is not as awful or difficult as it may seem.  But for now, all you have to do is pick 2-3 areas that seem like a good fit for you, and start applying.

In the mean time, consider applying at tutor.com for some additional side cash. 

Now go!!! Do it.  Make it a goal to choose your areas by Friday (or just go with Vegas and AZ, if those seem like a good fit) and then apply to at least 3 districts by the end of next week, and three more the following week.  Go!


I'll go to the website today.

little_brown_dog

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #34 on: October 03, 2016, 11:40:49 AM »
I know u feel like you have to give 200/mo to charity, and if you made more money I would be fine with you having routine charitable donations, but think about it logically. The 200/mo you are giving away now will just be siphoned from others if you end up requiring assistance from family/friends/charities/the govt because you have inadequate savings and retirement funds. So in reality, you are impoverishing yourself to feel good in the short term, but in turn you are increasing the chances that YOU will have to be a charity recipient some day, effectively cancelling out your donations from a monetary perspective.
There is a popular saying…charity begins at home. Most of us take it to mean that we should be generous, charitable and compassionate with our family members. But there is also another meaning, which is that by taking care of yourself first within reason, you are preventing yourself from requiring charity from others.
At the very least, please reduce this amount to something still generous but far more in line with your income. A charity donation of 50 bucks a month is very generous for your income will free up $150 to go into savings. A simple change like this will allow you to still give AND save for retirement. Win win.

FLBiker

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #35 on: October 03, 2016, 03:05:31 PM »
I think I probably posted about this on the previous thread, but I made good money (relative to cost of living) teaching in Taiwan, and it was a cool place to live.  I was there for 5 years.  And getting that overseas experience made it relatively easy to get a job in the US teaching ESL at a university.  From there, I moved into admin.  And I've also got a BA in English and an MA (although mine is in ESL specifically).  And I know lots of people who have followed similar career paths.

Dave's ESL Cafe is how I found my first job (albeit in 1999).  Most of the globe is open to you with an MA degree, though.  When I was looking to work overseas, EU countries were tough because they basically all employed UK teachers.  With the Brexit, though, that might be changing.

Good luck!

matchewed

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #36 on: October 03, 2016, 04:23:54 PM »
People are often stuck because they are under the illusion that if they think of an idea they can become unstuck. The ideas are there, in this thread and any previous one you may have put out there. The ideas aren't the problem. The action is. Act on the idea. Don't think about the hurdles. Act and if you encounter a hurdle act to move past it.

mozar

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #37 on: October 03, 2016, 05:17:34 PM »
I used to have extreme phone anxiety, but I made myself do it anyway. I barked on the phone, I stuttered on the phone, I accidentally lied, I was rude to people, my body would physically shake, but I kept doing it. It took me about 5 years to start getting better. You think that you have to be perfect in order to get ahead. But you don't, you have to keep trying.
The difference between people who are successful and are not successful is that people who are successful keep trying, they also fail a lot, and learn from their failures.
People rarely talk about the times they've failed so it's hard to figure out if your mistakes are normal or not. I too had jobs where I was expected to know everything before I was taught it. My solution was to move into a career where I found it easier to teach myself.

I've said this before and I will keep saying it. I really hope you read "Feeling Good, the New Mood Therapy," so you can start fixing your brain.

And you will have to move eventually. You live in rural Alabama if I remember correctly? There's a whole country/world out there.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2016, 05:22:02 PM by mozar »

pbkmaine

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #38 on: October 03, 2016, 06:27:49 PM »
I used to have extreme phone anxiety, but I made myself do it anyway. I barked on the phone, I stuttered on the phone, I accidentally lied, I was rude to people, my body would physically shake, but I kept doing it. It took me about 5 years to start getting better. You think that you have to be perfect in order to get ahead. But you don't, you have to keep trying.
The difference between people who are successful and are not successful is that people who are successful keep trying, they also fail a lot, and learn from their failures.
People rarely talk about the times they've failed so it's hard to figure out if your mistakes are normal or not. I too had jobs where I was expected to know everything before I was taught it. My solution was to move into a career where I found it easier to teach myself.

I've said this before and I will keep saying it. I really hope you read "Feeling Good, the New Mood Therapy," so you can start fixing your brain.

And you will have to move eventually. You live in rural Alabama if I remember correctly? There's a whole country/world out there.

Very good advice!

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #39 on: October 03, 2016, 07:05:01 PM »
I used to have extreme phone anxiety, but I made myself do it anyway. I barked on the phone, I stuttered on the phone, I accidentally lied, I was rude to people, my body would physically shake, but I kept doing it. It took me about 5 years to start getting better. You think that you have to be perfect in order to get ahead. But you don't, you have to keep trying.
The difference between people who are successful and are not successful is that people who are successful keep trying, they also fail a lot, and learn from their failures.
People rarely talk about the times they've failed so it's hard to figure out if your mistakes are normal or not. I too had jobs where I was expected to know everything before I was taught it. My solution was to move into a career where I found it easier to teach myself.

I've said this before and I will keep saying it. I really hope you read "Feeling Good, the New Mood Therapy," so you can start fixing your brain.

And you will have to move eventually. You live in rural Alabama if I remember correctly? There's a whole country/world out there.

Very good advice!

I really feel like I'm getting mentally past those things I used to use as excuses, such as "not being able to talk to people." I do it every day at my job, so I should be a lot better at it than I used to be. I really do think it's all in my head. I can do a phone interview as well as another person, maybe better. I can do an in-person interview as well as another person, too. I'm really not as bad at these things as I think I am.

I feel bad about leaving my "safe place," though. I like having the excuse of "I have social anxiety and ASD" to fall back on if things don't pan out. I'm at the point where I feel like I HAVE to try something new, though, because what I'm doing isn't exactly working. 


arebelspy

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #40 on: October 03, 2016, 07:07:39 PM »
Before you were scared of teaching overseas, now you didn't mention that.  Did you get over that?

Several people have offered suggestions around finding a better place to teach.

Are you willing to relocate/move?  Or not, and if not, why not?

Bump.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.

SwordGuy

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #41 on: October 03, 2016, 07:22:15 PM »
Wha... two degrees, one of them in education, and you can only find $20,000? I hear Las Vegas is always desperate for teachers. You can probably get several times that amount plus a signing bonus.

Maybe I just don't know how to apply? I signed up on their website, but they called me for some position I wasn't qualified for.
Did you decide that on your own or did they?   Because that's not always something you should be doing.  (Can't fly a plane and they want you to be a pilot.  Self-select out.  Want you to teach Chaucer but you specialized in Milton?   Get a damn copy of Chaucer and keep at least one lesson ahead of the class!!!   And pocket the big bucks for learning!)

It looks like you could more than double your salary in NC, and that's just starting salary.  Don't know what the masters would add.  Or city salary supplements.

I suggest you just start applying like crazy and take the first decent offer you get in a place that's not a hell hole to live in.

Don't like it?  Then go someplace else 2 years later as a more experienced teacher!


expatartist

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #42 on: October 03, 2016, 07:45:15 PM »
I really feel like I'm getting mentally past those things I used to use as excuses, such as "not being able to talk to people." I do it every day at my job, so I should be a lot better at it than I used to be. I really do think it's all in my head. I can do a phone interview as well as another person, maybe better. I can do an in-person interview as well as another person, too. I'm really not as bad at these things as I think I am.

I feel bad about leaving my "safe place," though. I like having the excuse of "I have social anxiety and ASD" to fall back on if things don't pan out. I'm at the point where I feel like I HAVE to try something new, though, because what I'm doing isn't exactly working.

Hi OP, I remember you. It sounds like you're doing some good analysis of what's behind the stuck-ness. That's good. Keep it up!

Before you were scared of teaching overseas, now you didn't mention that.  Did you get over that?

Several people have offered suggestions around finding a better place to teach.

Are you willing to relocate/move?  Or not, and if not, why not?

Bump.

+1
Sometimes, an entirely alien environment - like Asia, which has been my home for ~13 years - can be easier to adjust to than one that is one's 'home country'. There's a lot of prejudice in the northern/Western US if one is southern, especially if one has a 'southern' accent [an accent that many English love btw]. As a poster mentioned above, teaching ESL overseas will bump up your salary upon a return to the US. Also, the social and work life in English overseas is...different than the US. More diverse, yet more limited. More possibilities, more cosmopolitan, and if you do it right, much faster salary advancement, which will translate to a much better salary upon your return to the US.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #43 on: October 04, 2016, 01:04:50 AM »
I really feel like I'm getting mentally past those things I used to use as excuses, such as "not being able to talk to people." I do it every day at my job, so I should be a lot better at it than I used to be. I really do think it's all in my head. I can do a phone interview as well as another person, maybe better. I can do an in-person interview as well as another person, too. I'm really not as bad at these things as I think I am.

I feel bad about leaving my "safe place," though. I like having the excuse of "I have social anxiety and ASD" to fall back on if things don't pan out. I'm at the point where I feel like I HAVE to try something new, though, because what I'm doing isn't exactly working.

Hi OP, I remember you. It sounds like you're doing some good analysis of what's behind the stuck-ness. That's good. Keep it up!

Before you were scared of teaching overseas, now you didn't mention that.  Did you get over that?

Several people have offered suggestions around finding a better place to teach.

Are you willing to relocate/move?  Or not, and if not, why not?

Bump.

+1
Sometimes, an entirely alien environment - like Asia, which has been my home for ~13 years - can be easier to adjust to than one that is one's 'home country'. There's a lot of prejudice in the northern/Western US if one is southern, especially if one has a 'southern' accent [an accent that many English love btw]. As a poster mentioned above, teaching ESL overseas will bump up your salary upon a return to the US. Also, the social and work life in English overseas is...different than the US. More diverse, yet more limited. More possibilities, more cosmopolitan, and if you do it right, much faster salary advancement, which will translate to a much better salary upon your return to the US.

I'm not trying to make excuses, but before I go overseas, I need to make sure my communication and organization problems are a thing of the past. A foreign teacher might think I'm mocking him or her if I show up to teach unprepared one day, but this has been a subtle nightmare where I've worked throughout my life. Sometimes my mind just doesn't cooperate with me. I feel like I've improved tremendously lately, though.

Villanelle

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #44 on: October 04, 2016, 02:03:08 AM »
I really feel like I'm getting mentally past those things I used to use as excuses, such as "not being able to talk to people." I do it every day at my job, so I should be a lot better at it than I used to be. I really do think it's all in my head. I can do a phone interview as well as another person, maybe better. I can do an in-person interview as well as another person, too. I'm really not as bad at these things as I think I am.

I feel bad about leaving my "safe place," though. I like having the excuse of "I have social anxiety and ASD" to fall back on if things don't pan out. I'm at the point where I feel like I HAVE to try something new, though, because what I'm doing isn't exactly working.



Hi OP, I remember you. It sounds like you're doing some good analysis of what's behind the stuck-ness. That's good. Keep it up!

Before you were scared of teaching overseas, now you didn't mention that.  Did you get over that?

Several people have offered suggestions around finding a better place to teach.

Are you willing to relocate/move?  Or not, and if not, why not?

Bump.

+1
Sometimes, an entirely alien environment - like Asia, which has been my home for ~13 years - can be easier to adjust to than one that is one's 'home country'. There's a lot of prejudice in the northern/Western US if one is southern, especially if one has a 'southern' accent [an accent that many English love btw]. As a poster mentioned above, teaching ESL overseas will bump up your salary upon a return to the US. Also, the social and work life in English overseas is...different than the US. More diverse, yet more limited. More possibilities, more cosmopolitan, and if you do it right, much faster salary advancement, which will translate to a much better salary upon your return to the US.

I'm not trying to make excuses, but before I go overseas, I need to make sure my communication and organization problems are a thing of the past. A foreign teacher might think I'm mocking him or her if I show up to teach unprepared one day, but this has been a subtle nightmare where I've worked throughout my life. Sometimes my mind just doesn't cooperate with me. I feel like I've improved tremendously lately, though.

Then don't go overseas.   Are you actively doing something to "make sure [your] communication and organization problems are a thing of the past"?  Do you have good reason to believe you are almost to that point?  Like, within months?  If not, then this probably isn't the right path for you, because you need to do something about your situation now, not two years from now when you've had more therapy and whatever else you do.  If, in two years, you are at that point, you can reconsider.  Until then you need to find a plan you can start now.  It sounds like overseas is not that plan.  Fine.  So cross it off your list, don't look back, and move forward toward something else.  You are still just spitballing various option on the internet.  You could easily do that for decades.  And you'll still be right where you are, geographically, financially, emotionally, and in all other ways. 

Also, as someone who has moved overseas and who struggles with social anxiety, I'd say that my experience was a bit different and that in same ways I think think being in a new environment with those kinds of issues can be harder, not easier. I still feel a deep sense of... shame, I guess... every time I can't figure out a parking meter and I need to ask a stranger for help and hope that our limited language skills and our charades are enough, or when I don't quite know the etiquette associated with something and I'm worried I am going to offend, or whatever.  The alien environment and resulting lack of cultural literacies has really, really challenged my anxieties. 

And again, since you aren't at the point where you are ready to tackle that anyway, it's probably not the right choice for you. (Does it even appeal to you, outside of the money?)  So move on to the things that are.  If it interests you, keep it on the back burner as an option for the future.  But right now, you need to focus on the getting a meal started on the front burner so you can feed yourself.  Pick an option you can begin executing today.  You aren't there for overseas teaching, and you don't know if/when you will be. Nothing wrong with that.  But you can begin executing a plan to get a much better teaching job in the US today. 

You need to start making decisions, and taking actions.  You've been chewing over options for months, or longer.  Enough.  Decide, and act! 

arebelspy

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #45 on: October 04, 2016, 03:09:56 AM »
Not all the suggestions are overseas.

So:
Are you willing to relocate/move?  Or not, and if not, why not?

If no, just say no. But that's rather important to many of the suggestions that you seem to be ignoring.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.

kmb501

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #46 on: October 04, 2016, 03:18:18 AM »


Then don't go overseas.   Are you actively doing something to "make sure [your] communication and organization problems are a thing of the past"?  Do you have good reason to believe you are almost to that point?  Like, within months?  If not, then this probably isn't the right path for you, because you need to do something about your situation now, not two years from now when you've had more therapy and whatever else you do.  If, in two years, you are at that point, you can reconsider.  Until then you need to find a plan you can start now.  It sounds like overseas is not that plan.  Fine.  So cross it off your list, don't look back, and move forward toward something else.  You are still just spitballing various option on the internet.  You could easily do that for decades.  And you'll still be right where you are, geographically, financially, emotionally, and in all other ways. 

Also, as someone who has moved overseas and who struggles with social anxiety, I'd say that my experience was a bit different and that in same ways I think think being in a new environment with those kinds of issues can be harder, not easier. I still feel a deep sense of... shame, I guess... every time I can't figure out a parking meter and I need to ask a stranger for help and hope that our limited language skills and our charades are enough, or when I don't quite know the etiquette associated with something and I'm worried I am going to offend, or whatever.  The alien environment and resulting lack of cultural literacies has really, really challenged my anxieties. 

And again, since you aren't at the point where you are ready to tackle that anyway, it's probably not the right choice for you. (Does it even appeal to you, outside of the money?)  So move on to the things that are.  If it interests you, keep it on the back burner as an option for the future.  But right now, you need to focus on the getting a meal started on the front burner so you can feed yourself.  Pick an option you can begin executing today.  You aren't there for overseas teaching, and you don't know if/when you will be. Nothing wrong with that.  But you can begin executing a plan to get a much better teaching job in the US today. 

You need to start making decisions, and taking actions.  You've been chewing over options for months, or longer.  Enough.  Decide, and act!

Okay, here's what I would like to do:

1. Start a private tutoring business. Right now, I'm not sure I have the skills for it. I've worked as a volunteer tutor, but I'm not sure the parents would be as thrilled about my services if they had to pay for them. I'm not sure I measure up to the competition in this small area. I would like to try to get something started, though. It could be a decent side income or even a full-time profession, and it would be a good safe test for my shyness and disorganization. This is my first choice, and it would take the least amount of work to complete. I don't want to go in cold, though. Even though I've taken lots of Education classes and have a master's degree in it, I feel like I need to "look like a tutor," have official looking contracts, learning plans, and assessment tests. I also need to learn a lot more about kids with special needs, as so far my training has only covered regular and ESL students.

2. Apply for a teaching job in a neighboring area. Louisiana and Florida aren't too far from here. Although I would be a little reluctant to pick up and move to Nevada or a place where I wouldn't have ready support from friends or family if things didn't pan out, I could convince myself to move a state or two away. Perhaps I should look for opportunities in these areas? This would be my second choice.

3. Call schools several states away, explain my credentials and communication problems, and move several states away after checking on the area and making sure it's somewhere I might like to live and work. Even though I wouldn't be as close to friends and family, it would be less challenging than living overseas.

4. Contact a recruiter or language school overseas, explain my issues with shyness, and see if they have a place for me in spite of it. I would thrive in an environment where (1) other English speakers were working in the building with me, (2) many of the teachers spoke my language, and (3) the curriculum and lesson plans were pre-prepared for me just in case I forget something.   
« Last Edit: October 04, 2016, 03:23:11 AM by kmb501 »

Villanelle

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #47 on: October 04, 2016, 03:39:46 AM »


Then don't go overseas.   Are you actively doing something to "make sure [your] communication and organization problems are a thing of the past"?  Do you have good reason to believe you are almost to that point?  Like, within months?  If not, then this probably isn't the right path for you, because you need to do something about your situation now, not two years from now when you've had more therapy and whatever else you do.  If, in two years, you are at that point, you can reconsider.  Until then you need to find a plan you can start now.  It sounds like overseas is not that plan.  Fine.  So cross it off your list, don't look back, and move forward toward something else.  You are still just spitballing various option on the internet.  You could easily do that for decades.  And you'll still be right where you are, geographically, financially, emotionally, and in all other ways. 

Also, as someone who has moved overseas and who struggles with social anxiety, I'd say that my experience was a bit different and that in same ways I think think being in a new environment with those kinds of issues can be harder, not easier. I still feel a deep sense of... shame, I guess... every time I can't figure out a parking meter and I need to ask a stranger for help and hope that our limited language skills and our charades are enough, or when I don't quite know the etiquette associated with something and I'm worried I am going to offend, or whatever.  The alien environment and resulting lack of cultural literacies has really, really challenged my anxieties. 

And again, since you aren't at the point where you are ready to tackle that anyway, it's probably not the right choice for you. (Does it even appeal to you, outside of the money?)  So move on to the things that are.  If it interests you, keep it on the back burner as an option for the future.  But right now, you need to focus on the getting a meal started on the front burner so you can feed yourself.  Pick an option you can begin executing today.  You aren't there for overseas teaching, and you don't know if/when you will be. Nothing wrong with that.  But you can begin executing a plan to get a much better teaching job in the US today. 

You need to start making decisions, and taking actions.  You've been chewing over options for months, or longer.  Enough.  Decide, and act!

Okay, here's what I would like to do:

1. Start a private tutoring business. Right now, I'm not sure I have the skills for it. I've worked as a volunteer tutor, but I'm not sure the parents would be as thrilled about my services if they had to pay for them. I'm not sure I measure up to the competition in this small area. I would like to try to get something started, though. It could be a decent side income or even a full-time profession, and it would be a good safe test for my shyness and disorganization. This is my first choice, and it would take the least amount of work to complete. I don't want to go in cold, though. Even though I've taken lots of Education classes and have a master's degree in it, I feel like I need to "look like a tutor," have official looking contracts, learning plans, and assessment tests. I also need to learn a lot more about kids with special needs, as so far my training has only covered regular and ESL students.

If they aren't willing to pay, they won't.  That's no reason not to start.  You'll either get business, or you won't.  You might also apply to tutor.com.  They do online tutoring.  It would be some side cash, and could beef up your tutoring resume for your private business as well.  Also, I've done a very small bit of tutoring and was nerve expected to have contracts and learning plans.  I sat down with the kid's homework and explained it until they understood.  That's it.  And if you aren't qualified to teach kids with special needs, don't take that on right now.  That's another example of you putting off doing anything because you can't do one thing.  For now, slap together some fliers, post them at the local grocery store bulletin board, post on neighborhood Facebook groups, and spread the word any other way you can think of.  Don't over engineer this.  You can make it fancier later, or add more services.  The important thing is to get started.  Get this started on a casual level, especially if you are going to pursue #2, in which case it s going to hopefully be fairly short term.  If you are a decent writer, you can add help with college essays to your list of services.

2. Apply for a teaching job in a neighboring area. Louisiana and Florida aren't too far from here. Although I would be a little reluctant to pick up and move to Nevada or a place where I wouldn't have ready support from friends or family if things didn't pan out, I could convince myself to move a state or two away. Perhaps I should look for opportunities in these areas? This would be my second choice.

Okay, great!  So do it.  You could likely do both this and tutoring.  Or do tutoring until you find a new teaching job.  Tomorrow (or today), get on the internet and start apply.  Why aren't you doing this?  You've got a plan.  Now execute it.

3. Call schools several states away, explain my credentials and communication problems, and move several states away after checking on the area and making sure it's somewhere I might like to live and work. Even though I wouldn't be as close to friends and family, it would be less challenging than living overseas.

Why would you explain your communication problems?  You know you can teach.  You are doing it now and your communication problems don't seem to be preventing you from being somewhat successful at it.  Why would you call a future employer and lay out your issues?  How are they relevant, since you have proven success at teaching?  Don't give them a reason not to her you (or two reasons--communications issues that you seem to be suggesting might make you a less than ideal candidate or you wouldn't have brought them up, and judgement at actually bringing them up).  Apply to do a job you are more than qualified for, and have been managing successfully.   Over-explaining makes you seem awkward and like you might have poor judgement, and also like you are explaining in advance why you might not be good for the job.  Who would hire you if you do that, unless they are desperate?  These people are experts and if they decide to hire you, it means you meet the requirements for the job.  And since it is a job you are already doing, that shouldn't be surprising. Go forth with confidence, even if it is all faked.

4. Contact a recruiter or language school overseas, explain my issues with shyness, and see if they have a place for me in spite of it. I would thrive in an environment where (1) other English speakers were working in the building with me, (2) many of the teachers spoke my language, and (3) the curriculum and lesson plans were pre-prepared for me just in case I forget something.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2016, 10:55:22 PM by Villanelle »

arebelspy

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #48 on: October 04, 2016, 04:03:23 AM »
Okay, here's what I would like to do:

1. Start a private tutoring business. Right now, I'm not sure I have the skills for it. I've worked as a volunteer tutor, but I'm not sure the parents would be as thrilled about my services if they had to pay for them. I'm not sure I measure up to the competition in this small area. I would like to try to get something started, though. It could be a decent side income or even a full-time profession, and it would be a good safe test for my shyness and disorganization. This is my first choice, and it would take the least amount of work to complete. I don't want to go in cold, though. Even though I've taken lots of Education classes and have a master's degree in it, I feel like I need to "look like a tutor," have official looking contracts, learning plans, and assessment tests. I also need to learn a lot more about kids with special needs, as so far my training has only covered regular and ESL students.

2. Apply for a teaching job in a neighboring area. Louisiana and Florida aren't too far from here. Although I would be a little reluctant to pick up and move to Nevada or a place where I wouldn't have ready support from friends or family if things didn't pan out, I could convince myself to move a state or two away. Perhaps I should look for opportunities in these areas? This would be my second choice.

3. Call schools several states away, explain my credentials and communication problems, and move several states away after checking on the area and making sure it's somewhere I might like to live and work. Even though I wouldn't be as close to friends and family, it would be less challenging than living overseas.

4. Contact a recruiter or language school overseas, explain my issues with shyness, and see if they have a place for me in spite of it. I would thrive in an environment where (1) other English speakers were working in the building with me, (2) many of the teachers spoke my language, and (3) the curriculum and lesson plans were pre-prepared for me just in case I forget something.

Those all seem like good ideas to research into.  :)
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mozar

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Re: Mid-Life Crisis: I have not started saving for retirement
« Reply #49 on: October 04, 2016, 12:11:07 PM »
It's ok to start without looking professional.  All you need is one paying client, then you will be a professional. Don't spend money on business cards etc. until you have money coming in

Also we live in an extroverted culture. You can't explain your shyness and hope to get a job. You have to stop acting shy and take action.
It's really not so bad if you do something you think is embarrassing.  People embarrass themselves all the time. Nobody is going to lay down and die because you forgot a lesson plan.