Author Topic: Matching Dryer With New Washer  (Read 3690 times)

m8547

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Matching Dryer With New Washer
« on: October 05, 2017, 06:15:36 PM »
I'm going to buy a high efficiency washing machine since they clean clothes better than standard machines, and the energy savings will just about pay for the machine over the life of it by my estimates. Are there any good reasons to get a matching dryer with it? It seems like all dryers are about the same, and my standard dryer (it's just a white box like every other cheap dryer) probably works about as well as a $800 matching dryer.

Reasons to get a matching dryer:
  • Stackability (I don't need it)
  • Matching aesthetics
  • Maybe slightly less energy use?
  • Maybe better temperature control? (standard dryers seem to get quite hot even on the "low" setting)

Anything else? I use a drying rack much of the time anyway, so it doesn't seem like it's worth spending a lot on a dryer only to rarely use it.

DirtDiva

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2017, 06:28:46 PM »

I can't think of any reason to buy a matching dryer if the current one works, other than esthetics.

Just FYI, I did not love my front loading high-efficiency washing machine when I lived in a humid area (northeast).  It and the washed clothes often smelled musty, despite leaving the door open, doing frequent hot water/bleach rinses, and never leaving a load in the machine after it stopped spinning.

lbmustache

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2017, 06:31:15 PM »
Unnecessary to get a new dryer. I only replace appliances when they die but I can't image what the visual difference would be between your dryer and a new HE washer, unless you're getting one of the ultra fancy LG/Samsung futuristic-looking ones. Even then, I'd just keep the dryer till it dies.

You don't even sound like you want a new one ;) Just keep yours.

m8547

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2017, 06:47:47 PM »
I live in Colorado, so it's extremely dry here. Mildewey smell isn't a problem, and stuff air dries quickly as long as there's some airflow.

I'm not planning on getting a futuristic washer, but they all look much more modern than my dryer, which is the same design they've been making for 20+ years. The laundry room is just in the hall at the top of the stairs with no door or anything, so the old machines make that part of the house look a bit dated. But maybe I'll get a curtain or a door to hide everything.

These old dryers seem to last forever, so I wouldn't be surprised if it outlives a brand new washer. Look on Craigslist and you'll probably find more (and cheaper) dryers than washers.

One benefit of a nice dryer is that machine drying saves time compared to line drying. To line dry I have to spread everything out to dry, then fold it up when it's done. To machine dry I can just dump everything in the machine and then fold/hang it when it's done, so it's less time spend doing laundry. If I have a nicer dryer that doesn't overheat clothes or waste energy I'm more likely to use it. But I'm not sure if it's worth the energy used, even with a newer machine.

Miss Piggy

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2017, 07:21:30 PM »
I hated...no...I despised the high efficiency washer I bought a few years ago. It was so efficient that it used hardly any water. Stuff did not seem clean, and the wrinkles were terrible. I returned it to the appliance store and got the old-fashioned agitator water-hog model, and the world was right again. I guess I'm not going to save the planet with my laundry habits, but hopefully my recycling habits and electric car make up for it.

I've talked to other people who also hated their HE machines.

On the other hand, many people must like them, or they wouldn't be as prolific as they are. YMMV.

Cadman

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2017, 08:07:13 PM »
Yes, no reason to replace the dryer if it's currently working fine. However, don't expect miracles with the new washer.

The forté of an HE machine is reduced water consumption at the expense of longer run time (more electricity). They won't get your clothes cleaner than a good top loader unless you happen to have a very poor performer to start with. There is some evidence that substituting longer physical agitation in lieu of ample wash water in the old machines translates to reduced life of your clothing from physical wear-out. Not a problem for most consumers that get rid of clothing before "end of life", but it may be a consideration for some mustachians. YMMV based on water hardness, garment type, water temp and other factors.

MayDay

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2017, 08:17:07 PM »
If I had a dryer that only did super burning hot, it would definitely bother me.

But I'd still probably keep it and just hang dry delicate stuff.

lbmustache

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2017, 09:30:08 PM »
I hated...no...I despised the high efficiency washer I bought a few years ago. It was so efficient that it used hardly any water. Stuff did not seem clean, and the wrinkles were terrible. I returned it to the appliance store and got the old-fashioned agitator water-hog model, and the world was right again. I guess I'm not going to save the planet with my laundry habits, but hopefully my recycling habits and electric car make up for it.

I've talked to other people who also hated their HE machines.

On the other hand, many people must like them, or they wouldn't be as prolific as they are. YMMV.

I HATED mine when I used powder. I used the powder for HE washers... would constantly have clothes with stains and they just never seemed clean. I switched to liquid (specifically Seventh Generation) and have had no issues thankfully.

I agree about the wrinkles but once they are dry there seems to be no issue.

m8547

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2017, 11:08:00 PM »
Weird, I've never heard of anyone disliking their HE washer before. In my experience they clean better than top loaders since they give the detergent more time to work and keep it more concentrated. But I haven't used that many different HE washers, and maybe I've never used a "good" top loader? Since they use less water I can use warm or hot water without it being extremely wasteful. And because they spin more water out of clothes, I can dry them for less time if I'm using the dryer, which reduces wear on the fabrics. It makes sense that longer tumbling could increase wear on fabrics, but the forceful agitator in a top loader could also cause damage itself.

Laura33

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2017, 06:56:37 AM »
It makes sense that longer tumbling could increase wear on fabrics, but the forceful agitator in a top loader could also cause damage itself.

I have a top-loader without an agitator.  Freaking awesome -- plenty of space for even giant quilts, gentle on clothes.  And it automatically adjusts the water level to the size of the load.

Cadman

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2017, 08:59:45 AM »
Quote
Weird, I've never heard of anyone disliking their HE washer before.

I think you and I run in very different circles : ) As an appliance collector/restorer/researcher, here are a few things to note-

1. As someone mentioned above, you'll want to avoid powders. Not saying you can't use them, but because you have less water to dilute the powder, and because your clothes are now the substitute for the agitator, you can end up with incomplete dissolution and residue both in the machine and on clothes. Colder water temps compound the issue.

2. Spin speeds are actually slower compared to a TL because of the physics involved. The numbers advertised are under ideal conditions. You need an even distribution of clothing around the drum to keep the machine from going off balance. A FL is at a disadvantage in that gravity has your clothes at the bottom of a horizontal drum. This is why there's a distribution period before spin-out. The machine drains the water, then attempts to get those wet clothes to separate enough that they'll 'break free' on spin-up. This can take more time than you think if you have a load of jeans or towels and sometimes requires operator intervention. In a TL, you have both gravity and a full tub of water that keeps the clothes suspended so you get an even distribution on spin-up.. Problem 2 is that you've got a rubber boot at the front of this horizontal drum that you don't want to tear, so the machine is engineered to sacrifice performance on a less than perfect distribution rather than damage itself at too fast a speed.

3. Tangling. A lot of research has been done to keep clothes from tangling in a FL design, from reversing drum direction at random intervals to changing acceleration of the drum on each cycle. In a top loader, your water current is torroidal so this isn't really an issue.

4. Mildew and Smells. Keep on top of this and it won't be a problem. After you're done for the day wipe out the rubber boot and door jamb and let air circulate. Some people can't do this because of concerns about children or pets and are forced to use the myriad washing machine "cleaners" on the market. Don't get me started.

5. Bearing wear. Unlike the spin bearing on a TL machine, a horizontal axis drum full of wet clothes imparts quite a side load on the rear bearing set. This tends to be the weakest link in FL reliability and as you'd expect, the manufacturers are quick to discontinue these exact parts on last year's model.

6. Over-sudsing. Be sure you use HE detergents and measure carefully. Whereas suds lock can be cut on a top loader by opening the lid and adding a little fabric softener, your FL machine has a tub full of water with a locked door. Some have an access door-within-a-door for adding “forgotten” articles once the cycle has started where you might be able to get a little FS in if you run into trouble.

For those of us that are into this stuff, the best washer you can buy today is a top-loading Speed Queen.
http://time.com/money/4688676/speed-queen-best-washing-machine-american-made/

bacchi

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2017, 09:14:39 AM »
This is a thread about whether a dryer should be bought to match the new washer. Am I on the wrong forum?
 

sokoloff

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2017, 09:58:09 AM »
5. Bearing wear. Unlike the spin bearing on a TL machine, a horizontal axis drum full of wet clothes imparts quite a side load on the rear bearing set. This tends to be the weakest link in FL reliability and as you'd expect, the manufacturers are quick to discontinue these exact parts on last year's model.
I agree that this part is the weakest link on a front-loader, but I've not experienced any difficulty in sourcing the needed parts from aftermarket appliance parts vendors. The appliance companies are buying the bearings from industry suppliers; they're not making custom bearings. All you need is to find the industry cross-reference. As you expect, there are parts suppliers online who provide exactly this service.

Sibley

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2017, 01:25:43 PM »
OP - FACEPUNCH. and another FACEPUNCH.

You have a functional dryer that you don't use much. Who the hell cares if it doesn't match the washer? If you do, you're on the wrong forum.

tralfamadorian

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #14 on: October 06, 2017, 01:27:04 PM »
Weird, I've never heard of anyone disliking their HE washer before.

Ummm, I hardly ever meet someone who doesn't hate their HE washer. 

ender

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2017, 01:29:24 PM »
OP - FACEPUNCH. and another FACEPUNCH.

You have a functional dryer that you don't use much. Who the hell cares if it doesn't match the washer? If you do, you're on the wrong forum.

They don't care either, so your facepunches are kind of misapplied here:

It seems like all dryers are about the same, and my standard dryer (it's just a white box like every other cheap dryer) probably works about as well as a $800 matching dryer.
...

it doesn't seem like it's worth spending a lot on a dryer only to rarely use it.

The question is more, "I don't see any reason to get a dryer. Am I missing something?"

sokoloff

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2017, 02:56:29 PM »
Weird, I've never heard of anyone disliking their HE washer before.
Ummm, I hardly ever meet someone who doesn't hate their HE washer.
I love mine. Bought my first one back in ~1997 and immediately noticed less lint in the dryer lint trap, suggesting to me that it was easier on my clothes, and in fact many of my clothes last well into their second decade of regular wearing.

I moved that washer to my next place and then into our purchased house where it finally died at about 15 years of age (yup, bearing failure, and in this case, I couldn't get the tub off the spider without damaging enough parts to leave the machine beyond economic repair.) Bought a new one immediately afterwards and love that one as well.

A440

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2017, 02:49:40 PM »
I've heard a lot of complaints about front-loading washers not getting clothes as clean.   In the good old days, the top load machines I remember would have a dial that you turned for a different cycle length, and we tended to always put it toward the longer side.  And there did not seem to be any problems. 

On my current front load washer, when you start the washer, it defaults to a medium sort of cycle.  With several small kids, I found that I needed to set it to a longer wash, but there seems to be no way to make that a default.  So I always wonder if this is part of the issue with front loaders getting a bad rap.  I have been satisfied with ours, as long as I set it to "heavy soil," when I noticed things are dirty, which is almost all the time with 3 small kids. 

I felt our front loader did fine with cloth diapers and everything.

Not to forget the OP, I don't think there is a reason to get a matching dryer, because dryer differences are minimal.  If I were planning to see the house in the near future and leave the appliances, I might consider looking for a similar looking dryer on craigslist, etc--but seems entirely cosmetic.

frugaldrummer

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2017, 04:12:07 PM »
Are you buying a new washer because yours is irretrievably broken? Or just because you want a more efficient one.

I'll tell you what my appliance repair guy told me about my top-loading washer and dryer. He told me to TAKE CARE OF THEM. Don't slam the lid and keep them repaired, because he said the newer appliances with electronic controls were shit and didn't last.

pbkmaine

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Re: Matching Dryer With New Washer
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2017, 04:45:25 PM »
Quote
Weird, I've never heard of anyone disliking their HE washer before.

I think you and I run in very different circles : ) As an appliance collector/restorer/researcher, here are a few things to note-

1. As someone mentioned above, you'll want to avoid powders. Not saying you can't use them, but because you have less water to dilute the powder, and because your clothes are now the substitute for the agitator, you can end up with incomplete dissolution and residue both in the machine and on clothes. Colder water temps compound the issue.

2. Spin speeds are actually slower compared to a TL because of the physics involved. The numbers advertised are under ideal conditions. You need an even distribution of clothing around the drum to keep the machine from going off balance. A FL is at a disadvantage in that gravity has your clothes at the bottom of a horizontal drum. This is why there's a distribution period before spin-out. The machine drains the water, then attempts to get those wet clothes to separate enough that they'll 'break free' on spin-up. This can take more time than you think if you have a load of jeans or towels and sometimes requires operator intervention. In a TL, you have both gravity and a full tub of water that keeps the clothes suspended so you get an even distribution on spin-up.. Problem 2 is that you've got a rubber boot at the front of this horizontal drum that you don't want to tear, so the machine is engineered to sacrifice performance on a less than perfect distribution rather than damage itself at too fast a speed.

3. Tangling. A lot of research has been done to keep clothes from tangling in a FL design, from reversing drum direction at random intervals to changing acceleration of the drum on each cycle. In a top loader, your water current is torroidal so this isn't really an issue.

4. Mildew and Smells. Keep on top of this and it won't be a problem. After you're done for the day wipe out the rubber boot and door jamb and let air circulate. Some people can't do this because of concerns about children or pets and are forced to use the myriad washing machine "cleaners" on the market. Don't get me started.

5. Bearing wear. Unlike the spin bearing on a TL machine, a horizontal axis drum full of wet clothes imparts quite a side load on the rear bearing set. This tends to be the weakest link in FL reliability and as you'd expect, the manufacturers are quick to discontinue these exact parts on last year's model.

6. Over-sudsing. Be sure you use HE detergents and measure carefully. Whereas suds lock can be cut on a top loader by opening the lid and adding a little fabric softener, your FL machine has a tub full of water with a locked door. Some have an access door-within-a-door for adding “forgotten” articles once the cycle has started where you might be able to get a little FS in if you run into trouble.

For those of us that are into this stuff, the best washer you can buy today is a top-loading Speed Queen.
http://time.com/money/4688676/speed-queen-best-washing-machine-american-made/

I bought a top loading Speed Queen mechanical washer when my old washer died. I just LOVE it. I still have my old GE dryer, which I will keep until it dies.