Author Topic: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease  (Read 5978 times)

BZB

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logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« on: February 26, 2015, 06:52:52 PM »
I know there are quite a few MMM'ers out there with celiac disease or who for other reasons choose to eat gluten free.
We've been a gluten free household since my son was diagnosed 2 years ago.
We've moved through a few stages:

cleaning out our kitchen and pantry

overwhelmed with learning about the diet, cross contamination, hidden gluten in just about every packaged food

buying overpriced gluten free pre-made foods to substitute for what we used to eat ($9 pie crusts!)

making a few disastrous batches of cookies, and other failures

finally finding some good baking websites and learning how baking gluten free is so different than baking without gluten

We're still grieving a bit over not getting to go out to restaurants. We've only found a couple of places we can trust.



Most meals we eat at home are made with naturally GF foods, but there are times we want bread/tortillas/muffins/pizza, etc.

So here are my questions:
My kid is 5 and in daycare now, starting kindergarten this fall. He's not always going to have a similar gluten free version of what the other kids are having, but I try to provide it when I can (and have advance notice). We're dealing with pizza parties, birthday cupcakes at school, and in the future there will be more challenges.
We found Udi's sandwich bread at Costco, so that has been covering pb&j sandwiches, but I'd love to learn to make my own bread.
I have frozen a batch of unfrosted cupcakes, and found that a schmear of Nutella is an awesome no-effort frosting, just add some sprinkles.

I would like to have it together enough to have a stash of GF pizza crusts, cupcakes, hamburger buns, cookies and other goodies frozen and on hand, but baking GF is a lot of work.

How do you organize the million billion types of flour?
Does anyone have a system for baking ahead of time? I can't seem to get a rhythm going so I have a stash on hand when I need it (if I'm lucky I find out about a birthday party at school the day before).

I have a small chest freezer and a tiny pantry.

Any tips? I'm not so much looking for recipes as logistical advice.



2Optimists

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2015, 07:34:52 PM »
GF, but not celiac. I like the King Arthur brand of GF flour. It's expensive but it's the only one I actually like, in both taste and texture. Fortunately I baked lots before becoming GF so I understand the chemistry pretty well. I don't like the taste of most of the GF flours, but the King Arthur seems to substitute reasonably well.

I do "date night pizza" with a cauliflower crust* and picky teens (not mine) have eaten it and come back for seconds. I don't much like most of the pre-made baked goods, but Sklaar and Udi's seem to be the best. I usually don't splurge on the breads though.

I look for recipes that are innately gluten free though - think forgotten cookies - rather than trying to work around the flour issue.

When mine was little, I used to freeze unfrosted cupcakes and logs of cookie dough so I didn't bake an entire batch at a time. I've pretty well adapted to eating differently than most people, but I'm not 5. Chefs will often accommodate in restaurants, but it's often easier for me to make outings more special occasion (plus I'm unlikely to glute myself!)


*Google it. If you want to try it, I'll tell you my changes and hacks to the recipe.

frugaldrummer

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2015, 09:08:04 PM »
Canyon Bakehouse is another excellent gluten free bread, they sell it at Target.
Get a bread machine if you plan to make your own bread, they're awesome.


BrooklineBiker

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2015, 04:46:49 AM »
You might want to try googling for gluten free 5 minute no knead artisan bread recipes. I have found getting bread to rise without using wheat flour to be tough.

lakemom

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2015, 05:11:53 AM »
Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread....my daughter is allergic to wheat and we love the 4 Flour Bean Bread Mix from this cookbook.  I make up a huge batch of mix, portion it out in loaf size bags, and store in the pantry.  Then every other week I take out 2 and mix them up, bake, put one in the bread drawer and the other in the freezer.  Dd and I both really like this bread.

As far as money saving tips, I found a local bulk foods store that carries many of the 'specialty' flours that we use in our GF baking at a substantially lower cost then the local health food store (like 40-50% less).  Also keeping an eye on Amazon for really good sales of various flours and buying a case then.  Freeze most and store the rest in the pantry.

happy

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2015, 05:21:50 AM »
To be honest, I just avoid most baked goods for the reasons you've mentioned. But I can see for a child, you would want to have some treat food as near as  "normal" food. As2optimists said  try treats that are innately gluten free like meringues.

I've found potato starch great for thickening sauces and coatings.

Bobs Red Mill makes a good selection of gluten free flours/mixes. In Australia they are not cheap  as they are imported from US but I get them on a discount online grocery shop at a good price. Their chocolate brownie mix is good and you can freeze them. I make their raisin toast in my bread maker and then slice and freeze it. To be honest I think baking takes time whether it is gluten free or not. We mainly eat whole food cooked from scratch so theirs not hidden gluten

I've not found a satisfactory solution to bread. GF bread varies quite a lot, but even the best is a poor imitation. The only way I eat GF bread is toasted.

I think its wise to be wary about restaurants. I've been gluten "poisoned " quite a few times when I trusted restaurant food.

Meggslynn

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2015, 08:04:21 AM »
My son isn't celiac (as he has been tested for that yet) but is severely gluten intolerant. We just found out a couple months ago so we are in the learning process as well and the providing substitutes for childcare is by far the hardest part about it. At home we just eat foods that are naturally gluten free but I never realized how gluten dependent the foods were a childcare until he couldn't have them.

Sorry I don't have any tips for you as I am still learning but wanted to let you know you are not alone.

WhoaMama

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2015, 01:32:11 PM »
We're a GF household for 6 years now, sensitive though, not celiac.

I use Better Batter GF Flour. I tried to finagle all of the different kinds of flour and it was too much. Better Batter works for me for 95% of the recipes that I want to make, so I'm happy with it.

Like some others have said, we don't eat baked goods near as much as we used to. I've found a killer pizza crust recipe that you can prebake ahead of time and then freeze. I've frozen muffins and things like that in the past, but I didn't package them well enough plus they were in there forever, so I ended up pitching them. The freezer burn was too bad.

This may take a while to build up your stash, but could you bake one item per week? Like this weekend, bake a huge batch of cupcakes and then freeze them. Then next week do the same with bread.


Juslookin

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2015, 03:02:17 PM »
I have been gluten free for two years. I was a huge baker before my diagnosis so I mourned my diagnosis and than just learned to bake a new way. Unfortunately, it took a lot of trial and plenty of errors. I still have a ways to go.

I haven't mastered scratch bread but I buy Bobs Red Mill gf bread mix and make it in my bread maker. I slice and freeze. It is very tasty and much cheaper when I buy the mixes by the case from Amazon.
It is cheaper than any gf bread I can buy.

I bought lots of flours and experimented but I have gone back again and again to several mixes. Better batter is my daily go to flour for cooking, sauces, breading etc. King Arthur gf flour is really good for cookies and I use Cup for Cup for delicate baking, pastries, crusts etc. it was just trial and error to find what I liked. This year I baked regular christmas cookies and all my favorites in GF as well and froze them. They turned out excellent.

I always have some baked treats in the freezer and my kids who do not have celiacs love my GF baking, they never complain about GF zuke bread, cookies and banana Nutella muffins.

Have you checked out glutenfreeonashoestring.com ?  She gas some great recipes, lots of baked goods. I just mastered gluten free pork egg rolls which freeze wonderfully.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2015, 04:28:26 PM »
Are you at all interested in gardening? If so, read Carol Deppe's book "The Resilient Gardener". She has bred specific varieties of corn to get a true "flour" corn that can make a cornbread which works for sandwiches. But the only feasible way to get true flour corn is to grow it yourself.

Worth a read if you're interested. She is a celiac sufferer herself.

HP

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2015, 04:37:30 PM »
I buy gluten free flours in bulk from Azure Standard, as well as psyllium seed husk powder and guar or xanthan gum. I like millet flour best for texture and flavour; mixed with a bit of sorghum flour it becomes a little whole wheat-y. It's far and above cheaper than buying the teeny bags of B'sRM or pre-made mixes. There's no need for a billion types of flour, it just all goes in one five gallon bucket which gets scooted around the kitchen as a stepping stool.

When I make dinner, I make extra. It goes in the fridge for future incidences. For example, we have sandwich night once a week. I could make extra buns (side note, I make large flat buns instead of a loaf of sandwich bread as they cook up faster and hold together better) and toss them in the freezer to pull out later for hamburgers or personal pizzas.


I have found that 1-2 teaspoons of gluten substitute (the above mentioned gums or powder) per cup of flour is necessary for most recipes, but egg-heavy quick breads which do not require gluten development even in the glutinous counterparts don't need anything at all. I have also found that GF bread doughs need to be slightly wetter similar to a biscuit dough, and perhaps soak a bit, to not be dry/mealy. I also bake them to 200F instead of the 170F I do for gluten bread.

BZB

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2015, 07:28:43 PM »
Thanks, all, for the replies. I just need to grit my teeth and start baking this weekend. I'm going to get some containers for my existing flours, because right now I have a jumbled mess of small bags of flour. They are in the original bags, which close with a piece of tape the first time, but the second time the tape loses its stick and I have tapioca flour and potato starch poofing all over my kitchen.
I do love the glutenfreeonashoestring blog. Her recipes have worked best for me - all except for her pancakes which came out very dense. I made her soft pretzel recipe when my son's daycare was having pretzel making day, and that turned out really well, but a lot of work. I've learned with her recipes I really need to plan ahead because if he says the butter and eggs need to be room temperature, they really do or it won't work. Still looking for a pancake recipe.

lifejoy

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2015, 11:37:56 PM »
My fave recipe (I'll try to remember to link you later) is a garbanzo bean chocolate cake! Soooo good. Dense chocolate cake, and no need to buy special flour :)

Exhale

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2015, 08:51:55 PM »
Check out Gluten Free Girl (blog) - http://glutenfreegirl.com/

meep

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2015, 08:57:40 PM »
Check out Gluten Free Girl (blog) - http://glutenfreegirl.com/

Lol I came in this thread just to say to stay away from GFG.

HappierAtHome

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2015, 10:42:34 PM »
My fave recipe (I'll try to remember to link you later) is a garbanzo bean chocolate cake! Soooo good. Dense chocolate cake, and no need to buy special flour :)

I also need this recipe!

darkadams00

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2015, 10:42:45 PM »
DW was diagnosed with celiac a couple years ago, and she's done extremely well. However, our biggest disagreement has been on food education and choices. I would prefer to eat food that is naturally gluten-free rather than spend so much time and money buying and trying substitutes. I would go gluten-free in a minute, but I can't convince her to drop all of the wheat/gluten substitutes that she tries that I can't stand.

Craving a sweet? Greek yogurt. Smoothies. Ice cream. Chocolate. Oatmeal-based goodies. Creme brulee. Fruit snacks. You can go healthy or not, but gluten-free is not that hard once you let go of the anchor of baked goods. And we found a local cheesecake expert who created a scrumptious GF cheesecake just for us. We buy it twice a year as a special treat.

Meal options abound. Just move toward healthy choices that skip the breads, crusts, cream of's, and thickeners (broad strokes here, I know). I can plan for two weeks easily and never buy a substitute item. I wouldn't miss it because I like good food of all sorts. Maybe one day it will sink in for her.

For what it's worth, I had a coworker in her early 20's who was celiac since elementary school. She was diligent in her diet, and she just adapted. I'm sure she had difficulties in her childhood, similar to those of a juvenile diabetic. But in two years, I never heard her complain or skip any more social events than I did. The Internet has a plethora of information, and GF is moving more into the social/corporate awareness stage--almost every grocery store and most chain restaurants now have GF options. Good luck with your new journey.

lifejoy

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2015, 11:07:52 PM »

My fave recipe (I'll try to remember to link you later) is a garbanzo bean chocolate cake! Soooo good. Dense chocolate cake, and no need to buy special flour :)

I also need this recipe!

Tried and true :)

http://recipes.bushbeans.com/recipe/149550/garbanzo-bean-chocolate-cake--gluten-free--.aspx

lifejoy

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2015, 11:09:25 PM »
Also this one with gluten free oats:

Super delish, easy to freeze.

RetiredAt63

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2015, 07:53:30 AM »
To keep flour in it's original bag, fold the paper top down so the bag is well closed, and use an alligator clip to keep it closed.

I have been low carb for a few years and am now grain free, I am definitely healthier (beautiful blood work).  I basically have just rearranged my life so I don't need baked goods.  It can be iffy socially, but the words "no, thanks" get me through a lot of situations.  If people are pushy, ask them "would you offer peanut butter to someone who goes into anaphylactic shock to peanut butter?"  When they say no, then just tell them that they should show you the same courtesy.  This is an extreme measure, but it works.

I do eat out occasionally (these are social occasions, the meal goes under entertainment, not food, in my budget).  Grilled meat and plain vegetables (with butter are delicious) will get a celiac safely fed just about anyplace.  Since I am not celiac, just grain sensitive, I find I can eat an occasional Caesar salad when I am out, but if I were celiac I would avoid it unless I knew the restaurant made it's own salad dressing and could ask about ingredients.

BZB

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2015, 09:23:50 PM »
@library joy - thanks for the recipes - the garbanzo bean cake is intriguing, and I'm sure my son would love the energy bites in his lunchbox

@darkadams00 - good luck to you and your wife as you navigate the new diet. I wish I could turn off my parent guilt but I sure feel bad when I find out my son had to eat a fruit leather from his emergency snack bag while all the other kids in the class ate cupcakes at the classroom birthday party I didn't know about. I should practice for a few weeks making menus, including my son's school lunches, that don't include any GF substitutes such as bread, pasta, or muffins. Have you checked out Gluten Dude's blog? You and your wife might like it.

@RetiredAt63 - Yes, restaurants are a challenge. My son doesn't have severe symptoms (vomiting, extreme pain) when he gets glutened, so I always worry if he acts a little off after we have eaten at a restaurant. Even if he doesn't show severe symptoms, I know the damage is being done if he did get gluten. There are 3 places we have been able to trust. I am planning to get some glass jars to store my flours because, in addition to the messiness of storing the bags of flour, I worry about a weevil infestation. That would be the pits, because all those little bags cost a lot. I don't have room to store them all in my freezer, so I only freeze the ones that might go rancid.

@meep and @exhale,
now I'm curious about your experiences with gluten girl's blog! I have tried some of her recipes and some were successful The pizza crust recipe was not. She doesn't use xantham or guar gum and I think that might be part of it, and also some of the directions are vague. 

Metta

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2015, 07:56:40 AM »
Amazon has just made this book free:  Paleo Bread: Healthy Delicious Gluten Free Bread, Biscuits, Muffins, Waffles & Pancakes Cookbook!  Phttp://www.amazon.com/dp/B00SF5AT12 

I'm not sensitive to gluten, but I thought it might help people in this thread.

hyacinth

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #22 on: March 02, 2015, 09:01:27 PM »
My girls and I have been gf for about 4 years. I've tried many of the gf cookbooks but my favorite has been Artisanal Gluten Free Cooking by Peter and Kelli Bronski. They have a master gf flour mix that is used for all the recipes so you're not measuring out multiple flours for each recipe. I used to buy the flours for their mix from Amazon but my local bulk food store started carrying gf flours so now I buy them there. Their pancakes and waffles are amazing, and I turn to their sugar cut-out cookie recipe every Christmas. We also make the crepes a lot. I wasn't too impressed with their pizza though--our favorite gf pizza crust is the one made with Pamela's gf bread mix (I buy it via subscribe & save on Amazon). Pamela's cake mixes are also our favorite--honestly, I think they're better than regular gluten cake mixes! They're very moist. Bisquick gf mix makes pretty good pancakes that are faster than making from scratch. I buy gf Bisquick from Amazon subscribe & save.

Have you tried Aldi gf bread? It is our favorite store-bought gf bread. I don't make gf bread very often--the recipes I've tried either haven't been good or aren't much cheaper than buying it at Aldi. We also have been happy with Aldi gf pasta, chicken nuggets and brownie mix (though King Arthur gf brownie mix remains my absolute favorite). Aldi has frozen gf pancakes too but we've not tried those.

Sam's Club has started carrying more and more gluten free items as well--lately I've been buying Krusteaz gf flour at Sam's and using it in recipes instead of mixing up the gf flour from the Artisanal cookbook. Dealing with all those little bags of flours drives me nuts so I'm hoping this Krusteaz flour will work out as well as the homemade mix. I haven't priced it out yet to see if the Krusteaz is more expensive than homemade but off the top of my head it seems comparable. But if you must deal with all those little bags what helps me is to store them all in a plastic box in a closet (so they aren't taking up kitchen space) and bring them out once a month or so to mix up a bulk batch of gf flour which I package in gallon ziplocs or plastic storage containers. I've not heard of the Better Batter mix--I'll have to look into that.

hyla

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Re: logistics of baking & cooking gluten free for celiac disease
« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2015, 09:30:21 PM »
Best thing to do is get away from the need to make gluten free versions of baked goods, and just eat food that doesn't have gluten in it normally.  I did a lot of cooking and meal sharing with a gluten free roommate, and we spent no time at all attempting to make gluten free bread.  We ate a lot of rice, polenta, quinoa, potatoes, corn tortillas, squash etc. as starch/grain components of our meals, and of course you can still cook all the veggies and meat you normally would, you just need to watch the sauces you are putting on for sneaky ingredients.  We would occasionally eat gluten free versions of baked things like pancakes or cookies that don't need to rise the way bread does, but my experience with gluten free bread has been that it's underwhelming for the cost and bother.  If you are looking for portable lunch sandwich type substitutes for school,  good options are those flatbread type crackers (all rye) with peanut butter, or corn tortillas rolled up with hummus and veggies.