Author Topic: Letís talk new bike for wife  (Read 1989 times)

firemoney

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Letís talk new bike for wife
« on: May 31, 2021, 09:20:30 AM »
Since we are still in lockdown over super deadly, contagious covid we decided to take our bikes out and stroll.

My bike has hydraulic brakes that need service. Wifeís bike needs a new bottom bracket.

She paid 100 10 years ago for her bike so itís likely the repair will be more than the bike is worth.

Iíd like to buy her a new ďniceĒ bike.

By ďniceĒ I mean not junk (cheap things,are for rich people) but also,not super space age titanium carbon super material that goes through granite.

For reference I paid 1k for my bike in 2005. At the time that was the ďdiminishing returnĒ price point.

Iím asking because itís been since 2005 since I bought and now thereís internal gears, rubber drive belts and whatnot.

Looking for something decent quality for bike riding. Not daily commuting, racing, or extreme off-roading etc.

Just ďhey itís a new day to hop on a bikeĒ.

Gotta have disc brakes though. Can be cable. Actually wish Iíd gotten cable disk as I have to pay to service my hydraulics

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2021, 09:42:51 AM »
What kind of riding does your wife like?  Is she comfy with drop bars, or does she prefer flat bars?  Are you guys planning on doing any touring?

Without knowing any of those answers I'd recommend some sort of steel frame touring bike as a general purpose bike.  No heavy/crappy/unnecessary suspension to worry about, relaxed geometry is more comfortable than compact racing bikes, frames are a little overbuilt to withstand lugging baggage so you don't have to worry about anything breaking if you head across moderately bumpy stuff, typically these frames can take wider tires for greater comfort, they've got lots of points to add fenders/racks, wide gearing (usually with a front triple) means easy spinning no matter the terrain, drop bars will allow for a more aerodynamic position and different hand positions on longer rides.

(A hybrid without suspension can also work for most of the same reasons - main problem being the flat bars which don't allow an aerodynamic position or many handholds.  If you go this route, it might be worth popping a set of butterfly bars or at least bar ends on the bike.)

As an aside - I'd only favour cable actuated disc brakes if you're planning to use the bike in wet/muddy conditions very often.  The main benefit of running discs is the improved response and better control that hydraulics give you over braking - and this is lost with cable actuation.  In regular dry conditions there's no benefit between properly set up cable discs and cable rim brakes.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 09:55:28 AM by GuitarStv »

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2021, 10:00:09 AM »
As an aside - I'd only favour cable actuated disc brakes if you're planning to use the bike in wet/muddy conditions very often.  The main benefit of running discs is the improved response and better control that hydraulics give you over braking - and this is lost with cable actuation.  In regular dry conditions there's no benefit between properly set up cable discs and cable rim brakes.

And raw stopping power. For this reason disk brakes are the norm for cargo and mountain bikes. Agree, though, that the value proposition of disk brakes for OP doesn't make sense. Same with internal gear hubs and carbon belt drives and other fancy doodads -- these things may be reasonable for a daily commuter, basically your primary means of transportation. But for an occasional casual rider? Focus on simplicity and quality components from a reputable company, somewhere around the $500 price point. E.g. the Trek FX1 Stagger.

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2021, 10:06:29 AM »
As an aside - I'd only favour cable actuated disc brakes if you're planning to use the bike in wet/muddy conditions very often.  The main benefit of running discs is the improved response and better control that hydraulics give you over braking - and this is lost with cable actuation.  In regular dry conditions there's no benefit between properly set up cable discs and cable rim brakes.

And raw stopping power. For this reason disk brakes are the norm for cargo and mountain bikes. Agree, though, that the value proposition of disk brakes for OP doesn't make sense.

Probably makes sense on cargo bikes, but I'm not sure I buy the 'raw stopping power' argument for regular riding.

I have oodles of power (can lock up both front and rear wheels) on my touring bike with old style cantilever rim brakes.  You might even argue that less stopping power for the front wheel is a good idea for most casual cyclist . . . it's very easy to grab too much brake and go over the bars.  It seems like your stopping power isn't limited by the squeeze of the brakes but by the two postage stamp patches you're contacting the road on.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2021, 10:10:33 AM »
What kind of riding does your wife like?  Is she comfy with drop bars, or does she prefer flat bars?  Are you guys planning on doing any touring?

Without knowing any of those answers I'd recommend some sort of steel frame touring bike as a general purpose bike.  No heavy/crappy/unnecessary suspension to worry about, relaxed geometry is more comfortable than compact racing bikes, frames are a little overbuilt to withstand lugging baggage so you don't have to worry about anything breaking if you head across moderately bumpy stuff, typically these frames can take wider tires for greater comfort, they've got lots of points to add fenders/racks, wide gearing (usually with a front triple) means easy spinning no matter the terrain, drop bars will allow for a more aerodynamic position and different hand positions on longer rides.

(A hybrid without suspension can also work for most of the same reasons - main problem being the flat bars which don't allow an aerodynamic position or many handholds.  If you go this route, it might be worth popping a set of butterfly bars or at least bar ends on the bike.)

As an aside - I'd only favour cable actuated disc brakes if you're planning to use the bike in wet/muddy conditions very often.  The main benefit of running discs is the improved response and better control that hydraulics give you over braking - and this is lost with cable actuation.  In regular dry conditions there's no benefit between properly set up cable discs and cable rim brakes.


ďHey itís a notice day to jump on a bikeĒ
 No touring, commuting, racing, exploring mountains.

Rim brakes suck. Not gonna talk me out of that. We get wet we have no brakes. Well worth the piece of mind.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2021, 10:12:45 AM »
As an aside - I'd only favour cable actuated disc brakes if you're planning to use the bike in wet/muddy conditions very often.  The main benefit of running discs is the improved response and better control that hydraulics give you over braking - and this is lost with cable actuation.  In regular dry conditions there's no benefit between properly set up cable discs and cable rim brakes.

And raw stopping power. For this reason disk brakes are the norm for cargo and mountain bikes. Agree, though, that the value proposition of disk brakes for OP doesn't make sense. Same with internal gear hubs and carbon belt drives and other fancy doodads -- these things may be reasonable for a daily commuter, basically your primary means of transportation. But for an occasional casual rider? Focus on simplicity and quality components from a reputable company, somewhere around the $500 price point. E.g. the Trek FX1 Stagger.

For what itís worth wifeís current bike has rim brakes. She was riding it with a broken bottom bracket and didnít even want it to be fixed.

That trek looks like,a decent bike. Price is very reasonable. Just gotta find one!  Bike supply is another covid casualty

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2021, 10:23:17 AM »
Rim brakes suck. Not gonna talk me out of that. We get wet we have no brakes. Well worth the piece of mind.

My dad has an old Peugot from the '80s with steel rims . . . when that thing gets wet there is absolutely no stopping.  It's like you're not pressing the levers at all.  I'm wondering if you had a similar experience in the past.

I've been riding bikes with rim brakes year round (in snow, slush, and wet weather).  Braking is worse in the wet - the brake has to squeegee crap off the rim before you slow down.  You'll get no arguments on that from me!  But with a decent set of brake pads on aluminum alloy rims it isn't dangerous at all and you should still have decent stopping power in the wet.

I got my wife a bike with cheap cable actuated rim brakes, and the problem was that the brakes were too grabby.  She flipped the bike grabbing the front lever a little too hard and from then on refused to use the front brake at all to stop.  You really want that extra level of control that hydraulics provide with disc brakes for safety - especially if you're used to less powerful rim brakes.

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2021, 10:23:36 AM »
As an aside - I'd only favour cable actuated disc brakes if you're planning to use the bike in wet/muddy conditions very often.  The main benefit of running discs is the improved response and better control that hydraulics give you over braking - and this is lost with cable actuation.  In regular dry conditions there's no benefit between properly set up cable discs and cable rim brakes.

And raw stopping power. For this reason disk brakes are the norm for cargo and mountain bikes. Agree, though, that the value proposition of disk brakes for OP doesn't make sense.

Probably makes sense on cargo bikes, but I'm not sure I buy the 'raw stopping power' argument for regular riding.

I have oodles of power (can lock up both front and rear wheels) on my touring bike with old style cantilever rim brakes.  You might even argue that less stopping power for the front wheel is a good idea for most casual cyclist . . . it's very easy to grab too much brake and go over the bars.  It seems like your stopping power isn't limited by the squeeze of the brakes but by the two postage stamp patches you're contacting the road on.

Yep, overkill for casual riding.

In hindsight, though, I wish that I had gone for disk brakes on my road bike. I ride in the mountains and I've been caught out a few times in rain on long descents. Not too worried about it, not worth changing at this point, but disks would have performed much better.

I've had both kinds of brakes on mountain bikes... I will always pay the premium for hydraulic disk brakes on these. Lots of steep technical descents where precise modulation makes all the difference. And emergency stops when going perhaps a bit too fast coming up on something unexpected.

Again, just to be clear, I think OP will get better value by skipping the disks and going for rim brakes.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 10:25:17 AM by FINate »

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2021, 10:28:58 AM »
That trek looks like,a decent bike. Price is very reasonable. Just gotta find one!  Bike supply is another covid casualty

Note that it has rim brakes :) The disk brake version will run you an additional $400, and then you lose the step through frame. You'll find a similar entry level hybrid/city bikes from other makers, maybe even ones they cable disk brakes.

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2021, 10:34:54 AM »
If you're set on hybrids there are plenty of options to look for from all the major manufacturers . . . Giant Escape, Specialized Sirrus, Cannondale Quick, etc.  Just build a filter for your craigslist searches and one will pop up sooner or later.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 10:36:57 AM by GuitarStv »

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2021, 10:35:26 AM »
If you're absolutely set on disk brakes, here's one from Specialized with mechanical (i.e. cable) disk brakes for $750. However, looks completely sold out. And the rim brake version of the same bike for $650 (also sold out).

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2021, 10:51:26 AM »
Moving forward, no rim brakes. Period. Disk only.

Whatís a hybrid? When I bought there were mountain bikes and road bikes. Now thereís commuter, racing, mouton, hybrid, etc.  all marketing and Iím having a hard time weeding through the bull

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2021, 11:37:41 AM »
Is it possible to go to a bike shop and try a variety of hybrid and cruiser bikes? I've found it pretty impossible to buy bikes for my young teenage kids if we skip this step. You can research online all you like, but there's really no replacement for putting someone on a few different bikes so they can feel what each one is like.

A hybird bike is a mix between a road and mountain bike. They have no suspension and flat bars. They're often used for commuting or errand running and are best used on roads or hard packed, wide, flatish gravel trails.

We are pretty restricted now due to super deadly and even more super duper deadlier covid 19 (still donít know ANYONE who had it). Can only shop one person per household in any business. Plus there is absolutely ZERO bikes in my city due to super deadly and even more super duper contagious covid 19 (did I mention I know not one person who had it).

So I canít try or even buy a bike. (Looking at internet and buying)

Given that a hybrid has no suspension, mountain bike it is. Our roads are horrible. Sometimes the gravel/mud paths are better than the roads

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2021, 12:32:05 PM »
FWIW, I would not recommend getting a bike with a suspension if the intent is to use the bike on road.  Suspensions are expensive and require regular maintenance to work correctly, and cheap suspensions not only don't work very well to cushion impacts but are extremely heavy and can cause the frame to rob power from the rider as they pedal.  Both of these effects combine to make cycling more difficult than it should be and make the ride less fun.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2021, 01:06:36 PM »
FWIW, I would not recommend getting a bike with a suspension if the intent is to use the bike on road.  Suspensions are expensive and require regular maintenance to work correctly, and cheap suspensions not only don't work very well to cushion impacts but are extremely heavy and can cause the frame to rob power from the rider as they pedal.  Both of these effects combine to make cycling more difficult than it should be and make the ride less fun.

My bike has front suspension and rear hard tail. 2005 no maintenance or repair.

These ďcargoĒ bikes look neat.  Iím in Canada so they donít make sense.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2021, 01:36:07 PM »
Rim brakes suck. Not gonna talk me out of that. We get wet we have no brakes. Well worth the piece of mind.

My dad has an old Peugot from the '80s with steel rims . . . when that thing gets wet there is absolutely no stopping.  It's like you're not pressing the levers at all.  I'm wondering if you had a similar experience in the past.

I've been riding bikes with rim brakes year round (in snow, slush, and wet weather).  Braking is worse in the wet - the brake has to squeegee crap off the rim before you slow down.  You'll get no arguments on that from me!  But with a decent set of brake pads on aluminum alloy rims it isn't dangerous at all and you should still have decent stopping power in the wet.

I got my wife a bike with cheap cable actuated rim brakes, and the problem was that the brakes were too grabby.  She flipped the bike grabbing the front lever a little too hard and from then on refused to use the front brake at all to stop.  You really want that extra level of control that hydraulics provide with disc brakes for safety - especially if you're used to less powerful rim brakes.

Thatís exactly what happened to me. No brakes when,wet. No rim brakes for you! (Seinfeld soup nazi )

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2021, 01:51:39 PM »
If you're absolutely set on disk brakes, here's one from Specialized with mechanical (i.e. cable) disk brakes for $750. However, looks completely sold out. And the rim brake version of the same bike for $650 (also sold out).

Iíd likely buy the rockhopper for no,reason other than itís similar to my Kona caldera. In fact I,was,going to buy myself a rock hopper but bough the Kona because it was in stock and the rockhopper wasnít. Rockhopper has been around a long time.  Thoughts?

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2021, 11:58:32 AM »
If you're absolutely set on disk brakes, here's one from Specialized with mechanical (i.e. cable) disk brakes for $750. However, looks completely sold out. And the rim brake version of the same bike for $650 (also sold out).

Iíd likely buy the rockhopper for no,reason other than itís similar to my Kona caldera. In fact I,was,going to buy myself a rock hopper but bough the Kona because it was in stock and the rockhopper wasnít. Rockhopper has been around a long time.  Thoughts?

Thoughts? The Rockhopper is a solid mountain bike, though now I don't understand what you're looking for. I thought DW wanted a bike for casual bike rides. You know, a leisurely pace around town on pavement. Not bombing down mountain roads at 45 mph, riding in adverse weather, or mountain biking. You don't need disk brakes, suspension, or a mountain bike. Seriously, you can get a superior bike for her intended use for less money -- why pay more for a less enjoyable bike?

RE front fork suspension... you do indeed need to get these serviced every 30-100 hrs of riding or once a year, whichever comes first. If you don't the valving for damping/rebound gets wonky and the fork no longer works correctly for small chatter vs. big bumps vs. standing over the forks peddling. If you've never noticed a need to service your forks then you don't actually use nor need them.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2021, 12:14:13 PM by FINate »

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2021, 12:38:51 PM »
I too am confused about the kind of bike that you're looking for.

Looking for something decent quality for bike riding. Not daily commuting, racing, or extreme off-roading etc.

Just ďhey itís a new day to hop on a bikeĒ.

This description screams either a hybrid or a touring bike frame, both of which are great for bike paths and around town.

Proper tire size selection and inflation will cover the kinds of bumps that you would run into on hardpack, gravel roads, and asphalt.  Disc brakes are nice to have in muck and rain, but you'll be fine with rim brakes if you're not planning to be out in the rain often.  From the preferences mentioned though, it sounds like you're expecting to get most of the use of the bike on pretty bumpy off-road terrain?  Burms, some technical forest trails, 1 ft drops, that sort of thing?  If that's the case, then something like a rockhopper would be a great choice!

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2021, 08:33:18 PM »
Putting,around,our city and the occasional gravel path. Our roads are bad. Very bad, thus the front suspension.

Iíve always had a mountain bike. Thatís what we called them. I grew up.on Canadian tire branded bikes. Real cheap like a hundred bucks.

If your parents were loaded you got a norco from gooches.

Iím just confused,as to what the hell is,what now a days. Does it need to be complicated?

Comfortable, quality.

Disk brakes, lol.

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2021, 09:12:13 PM »
Putting,around,our city and the occasional gravel path. Our roads are bad. Very bad, thus the front suspension.

Iíve always had a mountain bike. Thatís what we called them. I grew up.on Canadian tire branded bikes. Real cheap like a hundred bucks.

If your parents were loaded you got a norco from gooches.

Iím just confused,as to what the hell is,what now a days. Does it need to be complicated?

Comfortable, quality.

Disk brakes, lol.

It's as complicated as you choose to make it. Two avid bikers are saying you don't need the expense or hassle of things like suspension and disk brakes and a full-fledged mountain bike. This is truly a case of less-is-more. A hybrid/city bike will come with tires wider than a road bike (for bad roads, gravel, etc.) while having much lower rolling resistance than mountain bike tires, and it's possible to get many of these in a step-through frame that is far nicer for cruising around town. The right tool for the job, that kinda thing.

RE bad roads: My first mountain bikes had zero suspension, not even up front. This was on trails with rocks and drops that would be impassible in a 4x4. My shock absorbers were my legs and arms. Where suspension really makes a difference is on big hits and long rides, neither of which apply to your situation.

That said, you don't need anyone's permission here to buy what you want. If you want to spend hundreds more on stuff you won't really use for an inferior experience, then by all means, go nuts.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2021, 07:33:19 AM »
Looks like Iíll have to find another bike shop. I was sold a mountain bike years ago with front suspension to ďsave my armsĒ.

So itís looking like a hybrid then. Still not gonna talk me out of disc brakes. Iíve been caught in water in the past and had the terror of bad brakes. Letís just call it insurance for unexpected bad weather.

As for tire selection, and pressure any guidelines?

My own bike I switched out the ďbig knobbyĒ tires to no knobby or road tires, whatever they are called. It made a huge difference.

The bike I was sold was a Kona caldera.

Do you guys have any good websites that I can get really good information without a marketing slant?

These days bike shops can be like car dealerships.

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2021, 07:44:54 AM »
Tire pressure is very important.  Many people just look at the sidewall and fill it up to the max rating.  This is almost always the wrong approach.  Too low, and you will go slow and get pinch flats.  Too fast and you'll have an uncomfortable ride full of shock/impact - and you'll go slower than with proper inflation.

Your tire pressure should be different between the front and rear (the more upright that you sit on the bike the greater the difference - on a time trial bike they're almost the same, on a road bike there's a little difference, on a mountain bike there's a little more difference, on an upright city bike there's a significant difference) and should be calculated based upon the tire size and the weight of the rider/bike.  This free online calculator is decent:

https://engineeredinsanity.com/clydesdale-how-to-estimate-tire-pressure/

Just fill in the info for your bike.  For percentage of weight on rear tire for casual riding, most people sitting in a fairly upright position will be somewhere between 60-70%.



As far as relatively unbiased articles . . . you can learn just about anything you need to about bikes (and fixing bikes) from Sheldon Brown's website:  https://www.sheldonbrown.com/articles.html
« Last Edit: June 02, 2021, 08:10:53 AM by GuitarStv »

nereo

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2021, 08:05:13 AM »
Just chiming in to give my 2Ę on the suspension/tire discussion.

I'm basically with GuitarStv on this... riding around town on mostly surface streets with some packed-earth paths doesn't require or benefit from front suspension.  Also, 'entry-level' front suspension are pretty worthless overall, adding complexity and weight while sapping efficiency and making the bike less responsive (safe).  ironically you can get a much better result on moderately rutted dirt paths choosing a rigid-frame with wider (e.g. 30-34mm) tires that are appropriately inflated than using a less-expensive MTB with entry-level suspension.

It's only when you start getting into the more expensive suspension forks that they become worth it, and even then they are great at single-track; you still pay a penalty (albeit a smaller one) on surface streets.

If the OP's planned riding is predominately "hey itís a new day to hop on a bikeĒ and explicitly ruled out "extreme off-roading" I see no reason to even consider any suspension. Under these circumstances it will almost always be more of a liability than an asset to the rider and to the person paying for the bike.
YMMV.

jac941

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #24 on: June 02, 2021, 08:24:46 AM »
The bike shop I frequent isnít like a car dealership. Find a new bike shop.

I agree that hybrid is best for your use case. Iím very sensitive to crappy potholed roads and donít like the rattling. I went with a steel frame bike with very supple 42 mm slick tires (Compass) which I run at 35-45 psi and the bike absorbs most of the rattling. Iím really a baby about this - Iíll never go back to aluminum frames with skinny hose-like tires. I find that this is a far better solution than shocks. Compass tires are very expensive but for me worth every penny - they run great on roads, gravel and hard packed dirt and they roll fast even when run at low pressure. Iíve heard GravelKings are good too, but I havenít personally used them.

The only bike in our house that has disc brakes is the cargo bike. It used to have mechanical discs - Avid BB7s. After having to adjust those things all the damn time for 5 years, I finally switched them to hydraulic discs which are $$$ but much lower maintenance. I will never have mechanical discs on another bike. I far prefer rim brakes unless discs are truly needed, but it sounds like you made your decision there.

If you like Kona, I think the Dr Dew is probably closest to what youíve described. I havenít seen it in person. I like Surly and SOMA bikes, but I got mine custom built so was expensive.

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2021, 08:36:46 AM »
Spend half a day with DW visiting several bike shops. It shouldn't come as a surprise that bike shops are in the business of selling bikes. Doesn't mean they're bad, just take everything with a big grain of salt, caveat emptor. The point of this exercise isn't the marketing material or sales pitch, it's getting DW on several candidate bikes to see what she likes (her voice is strangely missing from this discussion). Have her ride bikes around the parking lot/block. I realize this may be challenging with supply chain issues and you may not find exactly what you're looking for in stock. But they may have a rental of a similar model, or one with rim brakes, or slightly too large/small, and form this you can get a pretty good sense of what specifically to order.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2021, 08:38:18 AM by FINate »

ResolLaTot

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2021, 11:31:41 AM »
I have owned a Soma double cross (cycle-cross frame), and a Surly long haul (touring frame). Either sort of frame would work for the use case you describe. I preferred the Soma because it is a little zippier. But it's subjective. Comes down to feel and personal preference. My s.o. recently stepped up to a Kona Sutra and is in LaLaLOVE with it. I noticed cycle cross bikes were absent from this conversation so figured I'd throw that term into the mix for OP.  Recently Ive been hearing "gravel bike", which I gather is similar to a cycle cross.

There are many different sorts of bikes that will work. The surly/Soma/Kona models I mention may be more bike than is needed for an occasional "fun ride".  Fit is the single most important aspect of buying a bike. Find a shop that will spend time working with your DW to get that right. I second Sheldon Brown's treasure trove of a website as the authority on all things bike.

Other than fit I would prioritize:
Clearance for wider tires -soak up road noise and grant stability on dirt, hard pack, gravel, or broken streets.
Steel - again, soaks up road noise
Geometry/sizing that allows for handlebars to be slightly above the saddle for relaxed riding position.

I prefer drops for multiple hand positions. But that is personal preference. I recommend at least test riding a bike with drop bars. Make sure the flat part of the drops are at least level with seat if not above. A lot of people who think they prefer mtb style bars only ever tried drops that are way low, forcing a rider into more of a racing position.

-RLT

« Last Edit: June 02, 2021, 11:33:52 AM by ResolLaTot »

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2021, 12:29:08 PM »
Cross bikes can be great for general riding.  The only problem with them I find is that they're usually sold geared for cyclocross races - usually they come with a 46 tooth big ring which is much too easy for use on road.

jac941

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2021, 04:03:44 PM »
I like SOMA and Surly which is why I mentioned them before but agree with ResolLaTot that theyíre overkill for this situation. Raleigh and Breezer make decent bikes at a more affordable price point. I donít think they have a combo of steel frame, fat tires and disc brakes though.

I agree with FINate that your wife should test ride. But as the spouse of a person way less into bikes than me, I think narrowing it down for her before just going off and riding a bunch of stuff is helpful. My husband hates test riding bikes and would not want to spend a half day trying a bunch of things. He prefers to have 2-3 options so he can ride just those and choose. An hour max.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #29 on: June 02, 2021, 05:41:07 PM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike. Her ďbrokenĒ bike was like a hundred bucks over 10 years ago.

Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

nereo

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #30 on: June 02, 2021, 05:54:14 PM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike.

Uh... ok.... 


Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

Change of tactics then - repair the bike your wife doesnít seem to want to get rid of, preferably yourself.  Bike maintenance isnít terribly hard, and you can replace the bottom bracket for like $25.  What else is broken or need or servicing?

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2021, 06:25:57 PM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike.

Uh... ok.... 


Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

Change of tactics then - repair the bike your wife doesnít seem to want to get rid of, preferably yourself.  Bike maintenance isnít terribly hard, and you can replace the bottom bracket for like $25.  What else is broken or need or servicing?

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #32 on: June 02, 2021, 06:42:47 PM »
Tire pressure is very important.  Many people just look at the sidewall and fill it up to the max rating.  This is almost always the wrong approach.  Too low, and you will go slow and get pinch flats.  Too fast and you'll have an uncomfortable ride full of shock/impact - and you'll go slower than with proper inflation.

Your tire pressure should be different between the front and rear (the more upright that you sit on the bike the greater the difference - on a time trial bike they're almost the same, on a road bike there's a little difference, on a mountain bike there's a little more difference, on an upright city bike there's a significant difference) and should be calculated based upon the tire size and the weight of the rider/bike.  This free online calculator is decent:

https://engineeredinsanity.com/clydesdale-how-to-estimate-tire-pressure/

Just fill in the info for your bike.  For percentage of weight on rear tire for casual riding, most people sitting in a fairly upright position will be somewhere between 60-70%.



As far as relatively unbiased articles . . . you can learn just about anything you need to about bikes (and fixing bikes) from Sheldon Brown's website:  https://www.sheldonbrown.com/articles.html

Thanks for the links! Looks like Iíve some readin to do.

My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

FINate

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #33 on: June 02, 2021, 07:04:02 PM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike.

Uh... ok.... 


Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

Change of tactics then - repair the bike your wife doesnít seem to want to get rid of, preferably yourself.  Bike maintenance isnít terribly hard, and you can replace the bottom bracket for like $25.  What else is broken or need or servicing?

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

SMH. She doesn't want it, but you're going to buy it for her anyway. That should go over well /s

jac941

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #34 on: June 02, 2021, 07:29:56 PM »
My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

How?!? I just double checked my bike using the calculator and got 30-35 psi. 100+ psi would only be for a heavy rider on a skinny tire road bike. The bike you mentioned above is a mountain bike.

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

If she doesnít want a bike, just repair what she has. A bottom bracket replacement isnít a big deal. Is the frame damaged? An old steel mountain bike frame (no shocks) with the right tires is going to be far more comfortable than an inexpensive modern bike. Is it a junk box store bike? Or is it just old?

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #35 on: June 02, 2021, 11:00:03 PM »
My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

How?!? I just double checked my bike using the calculator and got 30-35 psi. 100+ psi would only be for a heavy rider on a skinny tire road bike. The bike you mentioned above is a mountain bike.

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

If she doesnít want a bike, just repair what she has. A bottom bracket replacement isnít a big deal. Is the frame damaged? An old steel mountain bike frame (no shocks) with the right tires is going to be far more comfortable than an inexpensive modern bike. Is it a junk box store bike? Or is it just old?

Iím 275 pounds. I ran the calculator with,25,lbs of bike and thatís what it told me.

Yes itís a junk box store bike. 100mbucks Canadian or 75 usd. 10myears ago.

Just wanted to buy her something nice.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2021, 11:01:25 PM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike.

Uh... ok.... 


Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

Change of tactics then - repair the bike your wife doesnít seem to want to get rid of, preferably yourself.  Bike maintenance isnít terribly hard, and you can replace the bottom bracket for like $25.  What else is broken or need or servicing?

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

SMH. She doesn't want it, but you're going to buy it for her anyway. That should go over well /s

Itís called being nice.  Itís not that she doesnít want it, she doesnít,want me to spend money on her.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #37 on: June 02, 2021, 11:13:28 PM »
My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

How?!? I just double checked my bike using the calculator and got 30-35 psi. 100+ psi would only be for a heavy rider on a skinny tire road bike. The bike you mentioned above is a mountain bike.

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

If she doesnít want a bike, just repair what she has. A bottom bracket replacement isnít a big deal. Is the frame damaged? An old steel mountain bike frame (no shocks) with the right tires is going to be far more comfortable than an inexpensive modern bike. Is it a junk box store bike? Or is it just old?

This web site says I should have 41 and 44psi.

http://mtb.ubiqyou.com/

nereo

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2021, 04:33:41 AM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike.

Uh... ok.... 


Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

Change of tactics then - repair the bike your wife doesnít seem to want to get rid of, preferably yourself.  Bike maintenance isnít terribly hard, and you can replace the bottom bracket for like $25.  What else is broken or need or servicing?

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

SMH. She doesn't want it, but you're going to buy it for her anyway. That should go over well /s

Itís called being nice.  Itís not that she doesnít want it, she doesnít,want me to spend money on her.

Ok, but you can understand our confusion when you first said: ďWife doesnít even want a new bikeĒ.

As this and several other threads have pointed out, now is a terrible time to be searching for a new bike.  It sounds like the current bike wonít cost much to fix, and wife is happy with it for now.  Iíd at least take it to a mechanic and ask what theyíd recommend repairing or replacing and get a quote.

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2021, 07:02:52 AM »
My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

How?!? I just double checked my bike using the calculator and got 30-35 psi. 100+ psi would only be for a heavy rider on a skinny tire road bike. The bike you mentioned above is a mountain bike.

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

If she doesnít want a bike, just repair what she has. A bottom bracket replacement isnít a big deal. Is the frame damaged? An old steel mountain bike frame (no shocks) with the right tires is going to be far more comfortable than an inexpensive modern bike. Is it a junk box store bike? Or is it just old?

This web site says I should have 41 and 44psi.

http://mtb.ubiqyou.com/

What tire width did you put in the calculator I first sent?  It's set to 25 mm by default, which is a very narrow road tire.  Typically mountain bike tires are 2.175 inches or 55 mm.

When I put in your info here (https://engineeredinsanity.com/clydesdale-how-to-estimate-tire-pressure/):
275 lbs
25 lbs bike
55 mm tires
60% rear weight distribution


I'm getting front/rear pressures of 29/41 - which seems about right.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2021, 07:33:48 AM »
Wife doesnít even want a new bike.

Uh... ok.... 


Her repair is likely going to be more than the bike is worth (bottom bracket is all lose and possibly damaged. I just want to get her something nice.

Change of tactics then - repair the bike your wife doesnít seem to want to get rid of, preferably yourself.  Bike maintenance isnít terribly hard, and you can replace the bottom bracket for like $25.  What else is broken or need or servicing?

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

SMH. She doesn't want it, but you're going to buy it for her anyway. That should go over well /s

Itís called being nice.  Itís not that she doesnít want it, she doesnít,want me to spend money on her.

Ok, but you can understand our confusion when you first said: ďWife doesnít even want a new bikeĒ.

As this and several other threads have pointed out, now is a terrible time to be searching for a new bike.  It sounds like the current bike wonít cost much to fix, and wife is happy with it for now.  Iíd at least take it to a mechanic and ask what theyíd recommend repairing or replacing and get a quote.

Yes itís hard sometimes online to get across points. Canít convey emotion, context, etc.

When I say ďdoesnít,even want a new bikeĒ it means she normally wouldnít spend money and spoil herself on something like a bike.

We are repairing her bike. Well, weíre dropping our bikes off for estimate/tuneups. They will get back to me with pricing.

Was just doing some research so I have information once I get repair estimate, nd then explore all options which at this point seems like none dues to super deadly, and even more super duper contagious coronavirus

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #41 on: June 03, 2021, 07:35:07 AM »
My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

How?!? I just double checked my bike using the calculator and got 30-35 psi. 100+ psi would only be for a heavy rider on a skinny tire road bike. The bike you mentioned above is a mountain bike.

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

If she doesnít want a bike, just repair what she has. A bottom bracket replacement isnít a big deal. Is the frame damaged? An old steel mountain bike frame (no shocks) with the right tires is going to be far more comfortable than an inexpensive modern bike. Is it a junk box store bike? Or is it just old?

This web site says I should have 41 and 44psi.

http://mtb.ubiqyou.com/

What tire width did you put in the calculator I first sent?  It's set to 25 mm by default, which is a very narrow road tire.  Typically mountain bike tires are 2.175 inches or 55 mm.

When I put in your info here (https://engineeredinsanity.com/clydesdale-how-to-estimate-tire-pressure/):
275 lbs
25 lbs bike
55 mm tires
60% rear weight distribution


I'm getting front/rear pressures of 29/41 - which seems about right.

Makes sense.

Iíve been over inflating all these years. I just inflate till it feels ďgood enoughĒ which has been 80 psi front and back.

Iíll try the new pressures

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #42 on: June 03, 2021, 07:42:48 AM »
My god, I need over 100 psi in my tires!! Iíve been way underinflated for years.

How?!? I just double checked my bike using the calculator and got 30-35 psi. 100+ psi would only be for a heavy rider on a skinny tire road bike. The bike you mentioned above is a mountain bike.

I have no idea what else it needs. Itís 35 labor for the bottom bracket. I d have to weigh the cost of tools to repair,vs actual repair.

Still want to get her a new bike.

If she doesnít want a bike, just repair what she has. A bottom bracket replacement isnít a big deal. Is the frame damaged? An old steel mountain bike frame (no shocks) with the right tires is going to be far more comfortable than an inexpensive modern bike. Is it a junk box store bike? Or is it just old?

This web site says I should have 41 and 44psi.

http://mtb.ubiqyou.com/

What tire width did you put in the calculator I first sent?  It's set to 25 mm by default, which is a very narrow road tire.  Typically mountain bike tires are 2.175 inches or 55 mm.

When I put in your info here (https://engineeredinsanity.com/clydesdale-how-to-estimate-tire-pressure/):
275 lbs
25 lbs bike
55 mm tires
60% rear weight distribution


I'm getting front/rear pressures of 29/41 - which seems about right.

Makes sense.

Iíve been over inflating all these years. I just inflate till it feels ďgood enoughĒ which has been 80 psi front and back.

Iíll try the new pressures

I'd strongly suggest checking the width of your current tires before changing inflation.  You may be using a non-standard mountain bike width, in which case the pressures for 55 mm could be off quite a lot.

nereo

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #43 on: June 03, 2021, 07:44:07 AM »

Was just doing some research so I have information once I get repair estimate, nd then explore all options which at this point seems like none dues to super deadly, and even more super duper contagious coronavirus

This is the fourth or fifth time you've brought this up in this thread.  as you said, it's difficult to convey emotion, context etc in an online forum.  If are being sarcastic, please consider being more respectful to those of us who have lost close friends and family members.

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #44 on: June 03, 2021, 11:57:15 AM »

Was just doing some research so I have information once I get repair estimate, nd then explore all options which at this point seems like none dues to super deadly, and even more super duper contagious coronavirus

This is the fourth or fifth time you've brought this up in this thread.  as you said, it's difficult to convey emotion, context etc in an online forum.  If are being sarcastic, please consider being more respectful to those of us who have lost close friends and family members.

Not being sarcastic. Way overblown and I couldnít care less if you lost loved ones. I really donít. So shut your fucking mouth asshole. Unless itís to,suck my,dick keep it fucking shit!!

Who the fuck do think you are?? Just go fuck yourself. And,fuck your lost loved ones. LOLOLZ.

Howís that bitch


MOD NOTE: Banned.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2021, 01:43:18 PM by arebelspy »

firemoney

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #45 on: June 03, 2021, 12:01:18 PM »
And,as,for,the rest,of,you,let this be a lesson. Stick to,the,script and answer my questions or feel my wrath. Seriously.

MOD NOTE: Banned.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2021, 01:43:26 PM by arebelspy »

nereo

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #46 on: June 03, 2021, 12:13:44 PM »

GuitarStv

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Re: Letís talk new bike for wife
« Reply #47 on: June 03, 2021, 12:36:25 PM »
And,as,for,the rest,of,you,let this be a lesson. Stick to,the,script and answer my questions or feel my wrath. Seriously.

Well, you've achieved one thing with that rude and unprovoked attack on another forum member.  I certainly feel less interest in providing any sort of help or information.