Author Topic: Keep the Rental?  (Read 4172 times)

new2this

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Keep the Rental?
« on: October 12, 2012, 01:23:32 PM »
We just moved out of our twin home of 7 years and have been renting it out for the past few months. My husband is wanting to sell instead, but I am trying to talk him out of it. We owe about $147,000 and in order to sell quickly in the area, we would be lucky to even get what we owe. However, we are able to rent it for $1175. The mortgage is $840, we pay the HOA fee of $99, and property taxes and insurance run about $1200 per year. I feel like we are getting more bang for our buck by renting it, but my husband considers it a headache that he wants to unload. What would you do?

twinge

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Re: Keep the Rental?
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2012, 01:46:22 PM »
Well, you're currently clearing $136/mo --but that's not figuring in any payment to yourself for time, costs for maintenance or the cost of any expected vacancies  (if you miss 1 month of rent even you're out 3/4 of a year's profit, if one 2K maintenance issue comes up you've rased 1 1/4 year's profit).  In my view, you're not clearing enough to make it worth your while.  I would agree with your husband and sell it.  Other more seasoned real estate folks may chime in with more specific advice.

arebelspy

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Re: Keep the Rental?
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2012, 01:52:05 PM »
We just moved out of our twin home of 7 years and have been renting it out for the past few months. My husband is wanting to sell instead, but I am trying to talk him out of it. We owe about $147,000 and in order to sell quickly in the area, we would be lucky to even get what we owe. However, we are able to rent it for $1175. The mortgage is $840, we pay the HOA fee of $99, and property taxes and insurance run about $1200 per year. I feel like we are getting more bang for our buck by renting it, but my husband considers it a headache that he wants to unload. What would you do?

Okay so each month you are paying 840 + 99 HOA + 100 taxes and insurance = 1039.  You're renting it for 1175.  That means each month you're getting $136/mo, or 1632/yr, that needs to cover all other expenses.

First, vacancy.  1 month per year (8% vacancy) is a reasonable estimate.  That knocks out 1175, leaving you with under 500/yr to cover maintenance/repairs (plumbing, HVAC, etc.), tenant turnover costs (new paint/carpet when a tenant moves, for example), any legal/accounting costs (paying for an eviction, for example), saving up for long term capital repairs (roof replacement, etc.), and any other costs (and yes, there are many more I can list, at least a dozen I can think of off the top of my head that may be infrequent, but will come up).

Over the long run, you are losing money on that property.  Likely quite a bit.  You will have many months where you collect that $136 spread, but then a large bill for repairs hits, or someone moves out and it takes awhile to get rented, and you lose all the money you saved from it, and more.

That's when managing it yourself.  If someone else manages it, you'll be paying another ~1400/yr.  By not paying them you're saving that expense, but giving yourself a side job.  If you want that, you can probably pick up a side job that earns more than 1400/yr.  In actuality, you're cash flow negative even managing it yourself, so it's a side job you're paying to do, rather than getting paid for.

If someone gave me that property free, I would decline.

I vote with your husband, be glad to get out of a losing investment without having to put any more money into it (selling for what you owe or a bit worse).

The caveat being: if it's in an area that you have particular reason to think will have strong appreciation in the short term, then you can delay selling and take the negative cash flow hoping to get it back when sold.  This is more risky (akin to market timing or gambling), but some prefer this.
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new2this

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Re: Keep the Rental?
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2012, 02:06:27 PM »
What if it means coming up with 20k to pay the remainder of the mortgage? There is a unit in our  neighborhood that has been on the market for almost a year at $130k.

Also, I can't find the post, but I remember seeing MMM saying that if your yearly rent amount is greater than (I think) 6% of the sell price then renting makes more sense.

I realize it isn't an ideal situation, it was purchased when we were really young and without a down payment, but I just can't stomach losing $20,000 or more right off the top. In the next few years I also plan to pay double mortgage payments so that we can refinance to a lower interest rate.

new2this

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Re: Keep the Rental?
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2012, 02:21:53 PM »
Nevermind, I just found the article.

"As for renting it out vs. selling it at a loss it is a good rental if the annual rent income exceeds about 6% of the current market value if you sold it". $7800 > $1632.

Excuse me while I brush up on my reading comprehension skills...

twinge

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Re: Keep the Rental?
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2012, 02:42:06 PM »
Have you looked in the possibility of doing a short sale?

 

new2this

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Re: Keep the Rental?
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2012, 02:48:33 PM »
Have you looked in the possibility of doing a short sale?

 

I haven't looked into it, but I'm not in love with taking a hit to our credit. We are saving for a down payment to purchase a new home in the next 4-5 years. Our mortgage is also through Bank of America and since they are so big and hard to deal with, I can't imagine trying to negotiate a short sale with them. I could be wrong though, it might be worth looking into.