Author Topic: Interview dilemna  (Read 4191 times)

Daisy

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Interview dilemna
« on: February 28, 2014, 03:37:01 PM »
I want some advice on a potential opportunity I came across.

I am in my 40s. I would consider myself a SWAMI (satisfied working...for the time being), definitely have FU money, am probably FI, and definitely have thoughts of RE almost every day. I was thinking a few more years before I felt comfortable with RE.

Why I am SWAMI:
- Have worked at the same place for about 20 years. I left for a few years to try something else out and got (happily) laid off from the other place and they took me back at my original company. I really disliked the other place. I had left my original company wanting to do a certain role, and when I came back they had started a group working on this very thing at my old company. When I came back, they honored my years of service...awesome!
- I get 32 days of PTO and management is very flexible (occasionally work from home). No one is micromanaging me.
- There was just a recent big layoff and I survived...morale is affected at work. They offered voluntary severance packages to levels just above me with two weeks of pay per year worked. The amount of money I would get if they ever offer this again is 1-2 years of expenses, so it's a good safety net.
- Work feels like family and I have a lot of friends there. I felt very welcomed coming back.

Negatives:
- Commute is about 28 miles one way. But I live a couple of blocks from the beach in a walkable/bikable area so I willingly entered into this arrangement. I used to live close to work and was bored with it. This can be somewhat bikable (leave car at work overnight and ride back, then ride into work the next day), but haven't tried that yet.

Situation:
- I just saw an opening matching what I would like to do even more (combining technology with working with artsy type of people) at a local startup. The work sounds very exciting.
- Commute would cut down to 17 miles each way (and the route is more bikable for sure).

Question:
I am so debating just even applying for this job. I already left my large corporation once so if I leave again I know I won't be able to go back. Although recently people don't even know the long term viability of the company locally and they may shut down the local office. But this could be 5 more years. I had thought that's when I would RE because I have such a sweet setup right now. I would hate to lose the flexibility I have and the huge amount of PTO by going to a startup. But, isn't this what FU money is all about? I guess it can't hurt to interview then if I get an offer I would assess the situation. This could be my first step into RE because I had wanted to look into something more artsy to complement my engineering background. I could also use the experience to enhance my future plans of working just 6 months out of the year and travelling the rest. So many thoughts to balance out in my head...

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2014, 03:48:18 PM »
First I would get a better handle on this:

I ..... am probably FI

Get rid of that probably. If you haven't already, run the numbers and see if your passive income exceeds your current expenses. Then figure out if your current expenses are adequate. If they are, congrats you're FI.

In my opinion the opportunity sounds like it's too good to pass up. It doesn't sound like you really need to worry about your current job. If it's gone soon you will receive severance. If it lasts a few years you will definitely be ready to RE. So... I don't think fear of losing that job should push you into the other one, but it sounds like something you were looking to do in the near future anyway. Why not try it out, and if it doesn't fit your needs you have plenty of FU money to fall back on.

Since it's a startup maybe they would be more flexible with working from home or working 3 days/week, which would be a nice intro into RE.

Numbers Man

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2014, 03:50:36 PM »
Why would you leave a piece of cake type job for the unknown when so close to calling it quits? You better understand the management style at this start-up. Most people I have run across that start new companies have a very in your face management style. Your independence might be compromised.

Daisy

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2014, 03:58:23 PM »
Why would you leave a piece of cake type job for the unknown when so close to calling it quits? You better understand the management style at this start-up. Most people I have run across that start new companies have a very in your face management style. Your independence might be compromised.

You hit the nail on the head on my dilemna!!!

I am basically bored at my job right now. After the layoff, a big project was cancelled. I know I will be working on something later in the year, but I am not sure when it's starting. I have been flapping around at work since the holidays. Not a bad place to be considering I am the opposite of a work-a-holic. I do well when I have to, but don't believe in working extra time all of the time.

I am about to go on a two week vacation. I fully use my PTO. Don't get me started on people that lose PTO days on the yearly rollover! I literally look at them as if they are from outer space when they mention it. PTO would be the biggest reason for me to stay. I only left for that other company temporarily because they almost matched the PTO.

I just talked with a co-worker whose husband started working there and he says it's a really cool project (they are kind of hushed about it), but that he only has two weeks of vacation.

I thought of interviewing and then asking if I can work on a contract basis.

I like the artsy part of the new company. I wouldn't want the crazy hours. Hmmm....

Daisy

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2014, 04:03:39 PM »
First I would get a better handle on this:

I ..... am probably FI

Get rid of that probably. If you haven't already, run the numbers and see if your passive income exceeds your current expenses. Then figure out if your current expenses are adequate. If they are, congrats you're FI.

In my opinion the opportunity sounds like it's too good to pass up. It doesn't sound like you really need to worry about your current job. If it's gone soon you will receive severance. If it lasts a few years you will definitely be ready to RE. So... I don't think fear of losing that job should push you into the other one, but it sounds like something you were looking to do in the near future anyway. Why not try it out, and if it doesn't fit your needs you have plenty of FU money to fall back on.

Since it's a startup maybe they would be more flexible with working from home or working 3 days/week, which would be a nice intro into RE.

I do run the numbers...all of the time. I started when I was unhappy at the other company. I thought "I can't do this the rest of my life!". I should probably say I am FI depending on how I calculate my expenses. Health care is a big variable, also the amount of money allocated to travel. I am currently selling my overpriced house and moved to a mortgage free place at the end of this past year so it's looking even better.

I am basically staying put because of my sweet situation.

I secretly wish they would offer me the severance. I could live at least a year on that. Depends on the package they offer. It was offered to the level just above me so I hope the next time around it gets offered at my level. I would hate to leave the current job and have that offered later in the year and I would have missed out on almost two years of expenses without working.

Daisy

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2014, 05:13:21 PM »
I guess I should clarify...my ideal situation at this point in my life is to have my current company offer me a severance package at some point this year. Then I take a year off of work with the severance pay. Then I look for a part-time or contract job at something interesting.

It's just that this new company seems like that "interesting" thing, especially if I can work out a non full-time job. The job description is exactly what I want to do (not exactly what I am doing now). But the timing is not right as I would give up a potential severance package in the next couple of years while working at a place with flexibility.

It does look pretty obvious that I should stay put. I suppose it can't hurt to interview just to see what that company is like.

tracipam

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2014, 06:33:19 PM »

Can't hurt to apply, can it?  Try, see if you get an interview, scope the place out.  Worst case, you get the job, don't take it, get severance later and sometime in the future another position at that company opens up and you apply again and already have interviewed. 

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2014, 08:40:31 PM »
I guess I should clarify...my ideal situation at this point in my life is to have my current company offer me a severance package at some point this year. Then I take a year off of work with the severance pay. Then I look for a part-time or contract job at something interesting.

It's just that this new company seems like that "interesting" thing, especially if I can work out a non full-time job. The job description is exactly what I want to do (not exactly what I am doing now). But the timing is not right as I would give up a potential severance package in the next couple of years while working at a place with flexibility.

It does look pretty obvious that I should stay put. I suppose it can't hurt to interview just to see what that company is like.

Ok this paints a different picture than the one I got earlier. Stick it out! If you will be FI (For sure!) within a year or two, plus you feel confident you might get that severance I would stay.

At that point, shit you could just volunteer at the startup if you wanted to, you won't need the money. How could they pass that up?

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2014, 09:17:03 PM »
Always go WAY over the top. Do you have red pants?

Daisy

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2014, 09:28:37 PM »
Always go WAY over the top. Do you have red pants?

I do own a pair of red pants. I'm not sure what this has to do with the topic, but I'll go with it...

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2014, 08:46:08 AM »
I think Kreigsspiel is offering fashion advice for the job interview. ; ) Or maybe wearing red pants will piss off management enough to get rid of you and accelerate that severance. Either way, solid advice! Red pants for all!

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Interview dilemna
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2014, 10:46:56 AM »
Yea exactly. Wearing red pants is an enhanced version of the red power tie.