Author Topic: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?  (Read 2153 times)

mistymoney

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Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« on: April 03, 2020, 06:22:44 AM »
So - now what?

Early to mid March - we stocked up on 2 good weeks, and +2-4 weeks emergency rations. We have run out of usual foodstuffs, paper products are low. Last 2 grocery runs have revealed nothing much - no tp, no frozen veg, were able to get some mushrooms and onions.

Is this going to be a long haul? Shortages for 6 or more months?

How to prepare for this now - when it seems too late?


maisymouser

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2020, 06:31:33 AM »
I'm in the same boat. I'm just hunkering down. I don't think there is much you can *do* apart from that.

Have you made or acquired cloth masks yet? That's on my to-do list as soon as I get my supplies from our second property.

Christof

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2020, 06:52:17 AM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

chemistk

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2020, 07:19:05 AM »
The best solution is to be creative with what's available in your area, currently. Substitutions and eliminations from recipes/daily consumption is the biggest imperative, as you obviously want to limit the number of trips out of the house and into the store if possible. It's certainly a great time to learn how to cook the (plenty) of food that's left on the shelves.

That being said, this won't be forever. As long as grocery stores can maintain a steady stream of deliveries, eventually the stores will return to 'normal'. All major food manufacturers are currently operating at near-normal production levels (I should know, I work in the food industry). Since production forecasts are set in place months in advance, many manufacturers have only been able to make as much as they planned to make per their schedule. Now that we're more than a month into this, a lot of products will be prioritized as much as production capacity allows. It just takes time for food to get from a manufacturing facility to the store shelf. For non-perishable items, that number is usually measured in months (plant -> shelf), for perishable but shelf stable items, that number is (usually) in weeks.

The produce supply chain moves at a much faster pace than the rest of the items in the store, which is why many stores are restocking produce and other perishables more frequently than stuff like pasta, beans, and frozen items.

Just be patient, and the shelves will be restocked in the near future, especially since most of the panic buying should be over.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 08:45:05 AM by chemistk »

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2020, 07:24:57 AM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

I think tp is easiest to replace as you mention. I don't want to think about cleaning up cat vomit without paper towels. I've already used about 10 klenex this morning and felt quite guilty about it!

We have been very flexible with food stuffs, but I'm not as confident as some of you that supplies will eventually be replace.

I'm worried about what may or may not be available in 3-4 months. I want 20 pound of lentils and rice. And it isn't anywhere.

Christof

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2020, 07:37:35 AM »
It seems to be available on amazon.com and a few other places I checked, albeit I can not say anything about their prices. We have friends that are farmers. They still work and grow crop. One problem could be that they pretty much decided on what to grow this year and that might not be what is needed, such as corn for bio diesel instead of peas or wheat. My friends are growing hemp, popular until recently, but doesnt provide food. They are on a multi-year contract, though.

Sibley

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2020, 08:25:03 AM »
I'm going to the store later today. Haven't been for 2 weeks. My must have list consists of 2 items (which technically I can do without but it will make me very, very crabby). And I'm looking for cleaning products for a friend, so hopefully can pick up something for her.

mistymoney - the pessimism I think is unwarranted. Yes, it's a mess. But it's not because we had a massive disaster that wiped out 50% of the food production capacity. The system is out of wack, and it'll take time for it to return to equilibrium. But it will eventually.

As for masks - well, I have 3/4 inch elastic. I have fabric somewhere. And I do have a sewing machine that is currently inaccessible without moving a bunch of stuff. I'm also working full time from home, so it's not like I'm sitting around doing nothing. I'll get there, eventually.

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2020, 10:26:33 AM »
I'm in the same boat. I'm just hunkering down. I don't think there is much you can *do* apart from that.

Have you made or acquired cloth masks yet? That's on my to-do list as soon as I get my supplies from our second property.

Masks haven't been on my radar. I personally haven't left the house in 3 weeks.

What are homemade masks compared to a scarf or bandanna use? Has there been any info on that?

tralfamadorian

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2020, 11:08:49 AM »
I'm going to the store later today. Haven't been for 2 weeks. My must have list consists of 2 items (which technically I can do without but it will make me very, very crabby). And I'm looking for cleaning products for a friend, so hopefully can pick up something for her.

mistymoney - the pessimism I think is unwarranted. Yes, it's a mess. But it's not because we had a massive disaster that wiped out 50% of the food production capacity. The system is out of wack, and it'll take time for it to return to equilibrium. But it will eventually.

As for masks - well, I have 3/4 inch elastic. I have fabric somewhere. And I do have a sewing machine that is currently inaccessible without moving a bunch of stuff. I'm also working full time from home, so it's not like I'm sitting around doing nothing. I'll get there, eventually.

LOL - yeah - like it was 6 weeks ago?

And btw - stop making up emotions that you think other people are having. It's rude, in case your mother never told you.

And even if you knew what emotions anyone is having - it is not yours to manage or even comment about. Grow up. Go start your own thread if you have a different line of discussion you want to have.

In my case - you have no idea what emotions I am having. Your guesses are wildly incorrect. But if I did want to have a melt-down pissy panic fit, I'd feel free to have one. And discuss it in any way I wanted to.

I feel that your response to sibley's post was outsized and bordering on a personal attack. We're all under a lot of stress and I think treating each other with some extra kindness will go a long way in the next few months.

wenchsenior

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2020, 11:09:05 AM »
I'm going to the store later today. Haven't been for 2 weeks. My must have list consists of 2 items (which technically I can do without but it will make me very, very crabby). And I'm looking for cleaning products for a friend, so hopefully can pick up something for her.

mistymoney - the pessimism I think is unwarranted. Yes, it's a mess. But it's not because we had a massive disaster that wiped out 50% of the food production capacity. The system is out of wack, and it'll take time for it to return to equilibrium. But it will eventually.

As for masks - well, I have 3/4 inch elastic. I have fabric somewhere. And I do have a sewing machine that is currently inaccessible without moving a bunch of stuff. I'm also working full time from home, so it's not like I'm sitting around doing nothing. I'll get there, eventually.

LOL - yeah - like it was 6 weeks ago?

And btw - stop making up emotions that you think other people are having. It's rude, in case your mother never told you.

And even if you knew what emotions anyone is having - it is not yours to manage or even comment about. Grow up. Go start your own thread if you have a different line of discussion you want to have.

In my case - you have no idea what emotions I am having. Your guesses are wildly incorrect. But if I did want to have a melt-down pissy panic fit, I'd feel free to have one. And discuss it in any way I wanted to.

Wow, did you read a lot into a benign comment. 

Rdy2Fire

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2020, 11:33:27 AM »
Went to the supermarket today it was well stocked and got everything i wanted/needed.

I went during what would normally be an off time but since people are working from home or not working there were a decent amount of people. I would say about 60% were wearing masks and gloves, some just gloves.

People were pretty respectful of space and the store has signs everywhere saying they are limiting items to 2 like items. 

chemistk

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2020, 11:49:55 AM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

I think tp is easiest to replace as you mention. I don't want to think about cleaning up cat vomit without paper towels. I've already used about 10 klenex this morning and felt quite guilty about it!

We have been very flexible with food stuffs, but I'm not as confident as some of you that supplies will eventually be replace.

I'm worried about what may or may not be available in 3-4 months. I want 20 pound of lentils and rice. And it isn't anywhere.

The biggest thing you have to understand is that nearly every food manufacturer is doing everything feasible (and within the guidelines set by local/state governments) to operate at as high a capacity as they can. This fact may seem obvious but the reality is, within the framework of what the FDA/USDA/State Ag Depts require, it's very very difficult to just turn your manufacturing processes on a dime. And yet, I've watched firsthand as formerly insurmountable logistical issues have been addressed and overcome at breakneck pace.

When it comes to stuff like rice and lentils (and other similar commodities), I do believe those items will take longer to come back to normal levels - mostly because those goods take an especially long time to go from farm to shelf and they're typically low turnover products so sourcing additional quantities has a much longer lead time.

The supplies (nearly all of them) will be back in stores eventually - both because there's only so much hoarding people can do before they just don't need to replenish their bunkers, and because almost every major manufacturer (food, paper, household supplies) is busting tail to get product to stores.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 11:52:00 AM by chemistk »

Gin1984

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2020, 12:00:52 PM »
But what happens when those people get infected with SARS-CoV2 and they need to shut down to clean?

lhamo

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2020, 12:08:27 PM »
Check and see if there are any places in your area that typically supply restaurants that are now doing pick-up/delivery sales to individual buyers.  The Seattle area is ahead of the curve and this is a shift that has been happening here that has helped to level out the supply chain disruptions somewhat.  If the amounts are larger than you need for your household you can try using a platform like Nextdoor or Buy Nothing to create a co-op buying group.

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2020, 12:12:38 PM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

I think tp is easiest to replace as you mention. I don't want to think about cleaning up cat vomit without paper towels. I've already used about 10 klenex this morning and felt quite guilty about it!

We have been very flexible with food stuffs, but I'm not as confident as some of you that supplies will eventually be replace.

I'm worried about what may or may not be available in 3-4 months. I want 20 pound of lentils and rice. And it isn't anywhere.

The biggest thing you have to understand is that nearly every food manufacturer is doing everything feasible (and within the guidelines set by local/state governments) to operate at as high a capacity as they can. This fact may seem obvious but the reality is, within the framework of what the FDA/USDA/State Ag Depts require, it's very very difficult to just turn your manufacturing processes on a dime. And yet, I've watched firsthand as formerly insurmountable logistical issues have been addressed and overcome at breakneck pace.

When it comes to stuff like rice and lentils (and other similar commodities), I do believe those items will take longer to come back to normal levels - mostly because those goods take an especially long time to go from farm to shelf and they're typically low turnover products so sourcing additional quantities has a much longer lead time.

The supplies (nearly all of them) will be back in stores eventually - both because there's only so much hoarding people can do before they just don't need to replenish their bunkers, and because almost every major manufacturer (food, paper, household supplies) is busting tail to get product to stores.

Yes - I think we all hope that things get restocked but for those of us who didn't do a 6-month stock up, and it seems many did, that is leaving us in an uncertain situation right now.

So - just as a silly example - where's the tp? The stores have been wiped out for a month or more now. I'm thinking - well - half the city did a 6-12 month stock up so when new ones are delivered we can get some. That isn't happening.

We haven't been able to get any tofu for weeks now. Have a little ground beef left, but not much.

Who is stocking up all of this? How much do they have put by and are they continuing to buy it?

I just don't know why I can't get things, and I'm trying to think of a longer term plan while we wait.

I guess the short version is: Yes, I hope so but I don't want to wait until we have nothing to eat to start thinking about if this is going to last awhile.

chemistk

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2020, 12:12:56 PM »
But what happens when those people get infected with SARS-CoV2 and they need to shut down to clean?

The current FDA guidelines suggest that at this time it is expected/assumed that the virus is not transmitted through food or food packaging materials.

Just about any product that's currently approved for production line, equipment, and environmental cleaning and sanitization is more than enough to neutralize the virus.

At our manufacturing facilities, there is a comprehensive set of procedures that have been outlined to determine the nature and extent of virus exposure. If there is a known case, what actions the plant takes will depend on who was exposed and when but the facility would not be shut down for any longer than necessary - the appropriate cleaning measures would be taken and the site would reopen for production as soon as safe (often less time necessary than you'd think).

Most food manufacturers likely already have similar protocols in place and the loss of product/production capacity would be very minimal.

Of course the bigger challenge for any company is if a significant percentage of the workforce becomes ill. Most companies, I'd guess, would reduce the number of shifts and slow down production enough that people could be as spaced apart as possible.


mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2020, 12:15:11 PM »
Based on suggestion here, I have removed several of my posts to not derail this further.

chemistk

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2020, 12:23:49 PM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

I think tp is easiest to replace as you mention. I don't want to think about cleaning up cat vomit without paper towels. I've already used about 10 klenex this morning and felt quite guilty about it!

We have been very flexible with food stuffs, but I'm not as confident as some of you that supplies will eventually be replace.

I'm worried about what may or may not be available in 3-4 months. I want 20 pound of lentils and rice. And it isn't anywhere.

The biggest thing you have to understand is that nearly every food manufacturer is doing everything feasible (and within the guidelines set by local/state governments) to operate at as high a capacity as they can. This fact may seem obvious but the reality is, within the framework of what the FDA/USDA/State Ag Depts require, it's very very difficult to just turn your manufacturing processes on a dime. And yet, I've watched firsthand as formerly insurmountable logistical issues have been addressed and overcome at breakneck pace.

When it comes to stuff like rice and lentils (and other similar commodities), I do believe those items will take longer to come back to normal levels - mostly because those goods take an especially long time to go from farm to shelf and they're typically low turnover products so sourcing additional quantities has a much longer lead time.

The supplies (nearly all of them) will be back in stores eventually - both because there's only so much hoarding people can do before they just don't need to replenish their bunkers, and because almost every major manufacturer (food, paper, household supplies) is busting tail to get product to stores.

Yes - I think we all hope that things get restocked but for those of us who didn't do a 6-month stock up, and it seems many did, that is leaving us in an uncertain situation right now.

So - just as a silly example - where's the tp? The stores have been wiped out for a month or more now. I'm thinking - well - half the city did a 6-12 month stock up so when new ones are delivered we can get some. That isn't happening.

We haven't been able to get any tofu for weeks now. Have a little ground beef left, but not much.

Who is stocking up all of this? How much do they have put by and are they continuing to buy it?

I just don't know why I can't get things, and I'm trying to think of a longer term plan while we wait.

I guess the short version is: Yes, I hope so but I don't want to wait until we have nothing to eat to start thinking about if this is going to last awhile.

I can understand what you're saying. It's all regional, too, depending on where and when the outbreaks are occurring. In our area, I can find anything I need today including TP.

A lot of areas right now are in the 'dead zone' where the lead time for the longer-to-stock items is running its course. I would suspect yours is an area like that.

Sorry to keep pounding the industry anecdotes, but it also hinges a lot on how close you are to the distribution centers that supply the stores in your area, and what part of the country you're in. East Coast and West Coast DC's are pretty easy to stock because there's a lot of production capacity for the biggest manufacturers and product can get to shelves quickly relative speaking.

If you're nearer to a Midwest or Southern DC, or your location is a significant distance from the DC, it's just going to be longer and more uncertain when you look at the restocking rate.

One huge hurdle the food industry is probably (because I don't work in logistics/analytics, I can't say for certain) dealing with is that products are unevenly distributed around the country. Most companies use incredibly complex data analytics and modeling to determine what stores should be stocked with what, where, and when. This is then worked out logistically way ahead of time and shipping schedules are fairly well set. Suddenly everyone, everywhere needs something and your model goes flying out the window.

I wish I could offer more advice. FWIW, I didn't stock up past 3 weeks myself, and even then I'd hardly call it a stock up. I really think it is/was unreasonable for everyone to run out in a huge free-for-all assuming the apocalypse is nigh.

I still have to go to work occasionally, so we're making a little bit longer than weekly grocery runs, but I can totally get trying to mitigate the risk and not go to the store if possible.

Is grocery delivery available in your area? 

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2020, 12:26:54 PM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

I think tp is easiest to replace as you mention. I don't want to think about cleaning up cat vomit without paper towels. I've already used about 10 klenex this morning and felt quite guilty about it!

We have been very flexible with food stuffs, but I'm not as confident as some of you that supplies will eventually be replace.

I'm worried about what may or may not be available in 3-4 months. I want 20 pound of lentils and rice. And it isn't anywhere.

The biggest thing you have to understand is that nearly every food manufacturer is doing everything feasible (and within the guidelines set by local/state governments) to operate at as high a capacity as they can. This fact may seem obvious but the reality is, within the framework of what the FDA/USDA/State Ag Depts require, it's very very difficult to just turn your manufacturing processes on a dime. And yet, I've watched firsthand as formerly insurmountable logistical issues have been addressed and overcome at breakneck pace.

When it comes to stuff like rice and lentils (and other similar commodities), I do believe those items will take longer to come back to normal levels - mostly because those goods take an especially long time to go from farm to shelf and they're typically low turnover products so sourcing additional quantities has a much longer lead time.

The supplies (nearly all of them) will be back in stores eventually - both because there's only so much hoarding people can do before they just don't need to replenish their bunkers, and because almost every major manufacturer (food, paper, household supplies) is busting tail to get product to stores.

Yes - I think we all hope that things get restocked but for those of us who didn't do a 6-month stock up, and it seems many did, that is leaving us in an uncertain situation right now.

So - just as a silly example - where's the tp? The stores have been wiped out for a month or more now. I'm thinking - well - half the city did a 6-12 month stock up so when new ones are delivered we can get some. That isn't happening.

We haven't been able to get any tofu for weeks now. Have a little ground beef left, but not much.

Who is stocking up all of this? How much do they have put by and are they continuing to buy it?

I just don't know why I can't get things, and I'm trying to think of a longer term plan while we wait.

I guess the short version is: Yes, I hope so but I don't want to wait until we have nothing to eat to start thinking about if this is going to last awhile.

TP: https://marker.medium.com/what-everyones-getting-wrong-about-the-toilet-paper-shortage-c812e1358fe0

Basically, demand for commercial TP (offices, restaurants) virtually disappeared, and the demand for consumer TP skyrocketed. TP designed for commercial use cannot easily be diverted to consumers. The low supply isn't just hoarding, it's true, immediate demand outstripping supply.

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #19 on: April 03, 2020, 12:53:50 PM »
TP: You can order a travel bidet or just create your own with a squeezable bottle and a straw. A wet wash cloth is a suitable replacement, too, though you might have some cultural based hesitations.

What food is available in grocery stores in your area. In our area some food is mostly sold out such as pasta and flour. Most food is available, so it is a matter of doing things differently than before.

You could ask when supplies arrive at your grocery store. At least in our area grocery stores still get deliveries, its just sold very quickly.

I think tp is easiest to replace as you mention. I don't want to think about cleaning up cat vomit without paper towels. I've already used about 10 klenex this morning and felt quite guilty about it!

We have been very flexible with food stuffs, but I'm not as confident as some of you that supplies will eventually be replace.

I'm worried about what may or may not be available in 3-4 months. I want 20 pound of lentils and rice. And it isn't anywhere.

The biggest thing you have to understand is that nearly every food manufacturer is doing everything feasible (and within the guidelines set by local/state governments) to operate at as high a capacity as they can. This fact may seem obvious but the reality is, within the framework of what the FDA/USDA/State Ag Depts require, it's very very difficult to just turn your manufacturing processes on a dime. And yet, I've watched firsthand as formerly insurmountable logistical issues have been addressed and overcome at breakneck pace.

When it comes to stuff like rice and lentils (and other similar commodities), I do believe those items will take longer to come back to normal levels - mostly because those goods take an especially long time to go from farm to shelf and they're typically low turnover products so sourcing additional quantities has a much longer lead time.

The supplies (nearly all of them) will be back in stores eventually - both because there's only so much hoarding people can do before they just don't need to replenish their bunkers, and because almost every major manufacturer (food, paper, household supplies) is busting tail to get product to stores.

Yes - I think we all hope that things get restocked but for those of us who didn't do a 6-month stock up, and it seems many did, that is leaving us in an uncertain situation right now.

So - just as a silly example - where's the tp? The stores have been wiped out for a month or more now. I'm thinking - well - half the city did a 6-12 month stock up so when new ones are delivered we can get some. That isn't happening.

We haven't been able to get any tofu for weeks now. Have a little ground beef left, but not much.

Who is stocking up all of this? How much do they have put by and are they continuing to buy it?

I just don't know why I can't get things, and I'm trying to think of a longer term plan while we wait.

I guess the short version is: Yes, I hope so but I don't want to wait until we have nothing to eat to start thinking about if this is going to last awhile.

TP: https://marker.medium.com/what-everyones-getting-wrong-about-the-toilet-paper-shortage-c812e1358fe0

Basically, demand for commercial TP (offices, restaurants) virtually disappeared, and the demand for consumer TP skyrocketed. TP designed for commercial use cannot easily be diverted to consumers. The low supply isn't just hoarding, it's true, immediate demand outstripping supply.

And so many of us aren't using office tp 8 or more hours a day! :P

stoaX

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2020, 01:27:39 PM »
Went to the supermarket today it was well stocked and got everything i wanted/needed.

I went during what would normally be an off time but since people are working from home or not working there were a decent amount of people. I would say about 60% were wearing masks and gloves, some just gloves.

People were pretty respectful of space and the store has signs everywhere saying they are limiting items to 2 like items.

I went to the grocery store this morning as well.   My experience was identical to yours.

Also, I was happy to see the tp aisle stocked and not a single person in it. I was glad to just walk past it knowing we didn't need any and feeling confident it will be there when we do.

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2020, 04:00:24 PM »
Ordering delivery was frustrating, no availability for delivery, no times, etc. I almost gave up. Things were popping out of my cart! No longer available. :(

I just kept refreshing the page and finally after several hours was able to pick a time. Tofu is back on the menu! Allegedly! Will see what gets delivered.

Paper products are still an issue - didn't occur to me to add to a food order - may not have been a good idea anyway - I was worried to take too long about the shopping.

I am amazed at what isn't available anywhere.....lentils.....split peas......really? The food no one wanted ever? :P




Sibley

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2020, 07:02:47 PM »
I was going to post the article that MonkeyJenga did, but they beat me to it. It makes a lot of sense re the different TP markets, and there's no/very little cross over. However, that does suggest that if someone is desperate for TP they should consider looking for the commercial supply, which should be in stock. I imagine that other industries might have similar situations, though probably not as pronounced as TP. Perhaps some of the cleaning products?

I just went to the grocery store tonight. It wasn't fully stocked, but it was decently stocked. Lots of per item limits, especially on the stuff that went so quickly before. Didn't impact me. The only problem I had was they only had one package of the cookies I'm currently addicted to. I got different cookies, which I also like, but are not the ones I wanted. I will live. The crabby Sibley is averted.

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2020, 07:32:29 PM »
I am worried a non-zero amount about the food supply, beyond just the bumps of current stocking up demand. 

Are farmers planting, fully?  Are they and the people tend their crops well enough to do so?  Will they be able to harvest everything, given who typically does the harvesting?  What about all the found we typically import?  (I believe the US is a net food importer, though some of that could easily be made up with less waste, if less waste actually happens.)

That said, I'm not sure there's much we can do about it.  Plant your own (of any food source), to the extent that you have the space to do so, for whatever good that will do. 

Frankies Girl

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2020, 08:12:08 PM »
Quick suggestion about the paper towel thing...

I used to think the same - can't do cat barf without paper towels.

And then I cut up a ton of old teeshirts that I was going to throw away due to being ripped/old/stained/ugly and realized I could easily cut them into nice wash cloth sized pieces, throw them into a cute container (basket) and sit them on my washer to handle general cleaning/gross stuff.

Cat barfs? Grab a couple to wipe/pick up the mess, dump said mess into garbage can, toss rags into washing machine. Next time you do a load of laundry, they get washed and then throw the clean rags back into the cute container. If they're horrifyingly disgusting, I always told myself I could always just toss the whole thing, but honestly, a bit of fur/food/goo isn't that big a deal and you can shake the majority off easily into the garbage.

Use a clean one with a squirt of window cleaner if it's a bare floor to clean it after, and they actually work way better (no paper bits) with a touch of carpet cleaner if on a rug.

I use them to wipe up spills on the floor, pick up cat barf, whatever. I make sure my first load of laundry is the hot wash/touch of bleach and the rags are great and I'm not chained to using tons of disposable towels.

« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 08:13:50 PM by Frankies Girl »

OtherJen

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2020, 09:43:35 PM »
Ordering delivery was frustrating, no availability for delivery, no times, etc. I almost gave up. Things were popping out of my cart! No longer available. :(

I just kept refreshing the page and finally after several hours was able to pick a time. Tofu is back on the menu! Allegedly! Will see what gets delivered.

Paper products are still an issue - didn't occur to me to add to a food order - may not have been a good idea anyway - I was worried to take too long about the shopping.

I am amazed at what isn't available anywhere.....lentils.....split peas......really? The food no one wanted ever? :P

Try smaller markets. I found both lentils and split peas (and several other dried legumes) at a small independent market last week. They were sold out of both the week before, so it was definitely new stock.

Christof

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2020, 04:07:24 AM »
Are farmers planting, fully?  Are they and the people tend their crops well enough to do so?  Will they be able to harvest everything, given who typically does the harvesting?  What about all the found we typically import?  (I believe the US is a net food importer, though some of that could easily be made up with less waste, if less waste actually happens.)

In Germany we have some of this already happening... Asparagus and strawberries are both labor intensive to harvest. Many workers apparently come from Poland or other Eastern European countries that now can't enter Germany or don't want to enter Germany.

And then there's a lot of specialization even in farming. Oregon is a major producer of carrot seeds that are exported world-wide. They are harvested the second year making it hard to suddenly move production elsewhere.

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2020, 06:34:51 AM »
Are farmers planting, fully?  Are they and the people tend their crops well enough to do so?  Will they be able to harvest everything, given who typically does the harvesting?  What about all the found we typically import?  (I believe the US is a net food importer, though some of that could easily be made up with less waste, if less waste actually happens.)

In Germany we have some of this already happening... Asparagus and strawberries are both labor intensive to harvest. Many workers apparently come from Poland or other Eastern European countries that now can't enter Germany or don't want to enter Germany.

And then there's a lot of specialization even in farming. Oregon is a major producer of carrot seeds that are exported world-wide. They are harvested the second year making it hard to suddenly move production elsewhere.

interesting. it seems likely that a lot of food items will become at least more expensive and less plentiful even if still available.

who knew about Oregon cornering the market in carrot seeds! LOL!

mistymoney

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2020, 07:06:24 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/04/europe/southern-italy-coronavirus-black-economy-intl/index.html

Italy starting to have some social/economic fallout from the pandemic with food issues at the forefront for those who aren't needing medical care.

Something to think about.

In the US, already noting a class divide in those who need to risk their health in essential businesses.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/30/economy/shipping-company-workers-coronavirus/index.html

As a precaution, I plan to try to stockpile a 6 month supply of paper products and rice and beans slowly over time. Just buying what we need plus a a little extra each time. If things don't worsen in terms of supply chain and availability of food and essentials, no big deal but we won't have immediate critical food issues in our household if it does.

but - joke is kind of on me for not stocking up early. Lentils going for nearly $4/pound. Used to get them local at the store for about 1.50.

Note on gardening - I will try to plant some things, but I haven't had much luck previously. Between squirrels, bunnies, raccoons, etc. it is usually an exercise in frustration.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2020, 07:09:03 AM by mistymoney »

tralfamadorian

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2020, 09:23:10 AM »
Planet Money did a podcast last week about the food supply in the US that covers some of the points brought up here-
https://www.npr.org/2020/03/25/821593542/episode-984-food-and-farmworkers

Regarding ways to get produce and animal protein if things stay uneven or become more difficult as the spring continues- personally, I emailed the local farmers market for contact info for the vendors then called/emailed them. Many who were previously market only are doing a weekly delivery or contactless pickup as the farmers markets are closed in my state. The ones who are not as tech savvy- no online ordering, website, social media- were not fully booked out already and seemed grateful for the interest.

I bought 25lb of rice and 50lb of flour in late February in a nod to over the top preparativeness. Of course now I wish I had bought a variety of dried legumes as well.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2020, 08:14:37 PM by tralfamadorian »

Serendip

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Re: Ongoing coronavirus preparedness?
« Reply #30 on: April 04, 2020, 10:28:02 AM »
Planet Money did a podcast last week about the food supply in the US that covers some of the points brought up here-
https://www.npr.org/2020/03/25/821593542/episode-984-food-and-farmworkers

Regarding ways to get produce and animal protein if things stay uneven or become more difficult as the spring continues- personally, I emailed the local farmers market for contact info for the vendors then called/emailed them. Many who were previously market only are doing a weekly delivery or contactless pickup as the farmers markets are closed in my state. The ones who are not as tech savvy- no online ordering, website, social media- were not fully booked out already and seemed grateful for the interest.

I bought 25lb of rice and 50lb of flour in late February in a nod to over the top conservationism. Of course now I wish I had bought a variety of dried legumes as well.

Good idea to email the farmers.

Some friends who are farmers have accepted more people into their CSA programs (Community Supported Agriculture) as they are also uncertain about what the markets will look like this year, and this helps support them directly. We received a weekly veggie box in the past but for the past few years have grown a small garden and supplemented with trips to the farmers market. We signed up for their program this year..at least we will have plentiful veggies and I saw that other small farms are doing CSA-style chickens too.