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How much time to accept a job offer?

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Villanelle:
DH is retiring from the military and job hunting.  Neither of us have every really done higher level job hunting so we are clueless.

Typically, how long from when you get the call saying, "We'd like to hire you as Assistant Director of Mustachianism, with $5m salary and these other details," do you have to accept or reject?  Do you need to negotiate right away?  Like, do you say you want $6m, they come back at $5.5, and then you say, "Give me X days?"

Part of what is driving the question is several of the potential jobs are in places we've never been, and places are are absolutely not sure about.  We are happy to relocate, and in fact don't really want to stay where we are.  But we'd like to at least be able to squeeze in a 3-4 day trip to a city we've never been, before accepting.  But that takes some time to plan (booking dogsitters is an expensive nightmare!). Is it reasonable to ask for 2 weeks?  More?  Less? 

(In once case, even if the interview isn't Zoom, it would likely be where we are now, which is where most of the company is located, not in job city. So we'd have to plan our own trip there to check it out, at some point  In the other case, if it isn't virtual, it would probably be in the city.  But is it worth it for me to go along for the interview, pay for a ticket and dog sitter, plus maybe a couple days in the hotel if we extend our stay beyond whatever they pay for for him for the interview, if he's only at the interview stage and might not get an offer?)

TreeLeaf:
Typically I get the offer, then negotiate the offer, then after I accept the start date is very flexible. I would say around 2-4 weeks is normal wait for a start date in my field (Software dev). Time to negotiate and accept the offer is usually much shorter - probably 2-5 days in my experience - and I have 'lost' positions because I spent over a week thinking about it (I had multiple offers on the table so no big deal, and probably was not going to accept their offer anyway so it all worked out in the end).

Companies have to fill positions and some of them are not willing to wait for someone to accept an offer. It all sort of depends on the company and hiring manager, etc. I'm not sure if there is any sort of standard or universally accepted answer, and the willingness of a company to wait for someone to accept an offer probably changes as the job market changes as well and is different from industry to industry.

In your shoes I would probably just choose a few cities that seem interesting, and go visit them, then move, then find a job in the new city. But as you might guess I'm an incredible optimist when it comes to finding jobs, which is all based on my own experience in life and not on any sort of empirical data. So I have always chosen the location I want first, then just assumed there will be jobs there that meet my needs.

Good luck. :)

Villanelle:

--- Quote from: TreeLeaf on February 23, 2024, 05:51:38 PM ---Typically I get the offer, then negotiate the offer, then after I accept the start date is very flexible. I would say around 2-4 weeks is normal wait for a start date in my field (Software dev). Time to negotiate and accept the offer is usually much shorter - probably 2-5 days in my experience - and I have 'lost' positions because I spent over a week thinking about it (I had multiple offers on the table so no big deal, and probably was not going to accept their offer anyway so it all worked out in the end).

Companies have to fill positions and some of them are not willing to wait for someone to accept an offer. It all sort of depends on the company and hiring manager, etc. I'm not sure if there is any sort of standard or universally accepted answer, and the willingness of a company to wait for someone to accept an offer probably changes as the job market changes as well and is different from industry to industry.

In your shoes I would probably just choose a few cities that seem interesting, and go visit them, then move, then find a job in the new city. But as you might guess I'm an incredible optimist when it comes to finding jobs, which is all based on my own experience in life and not on any sort of empirical data. So I have always chosen the location I want first, then just assumed there will be jobs there that meet my needs.

Good luck. :)

--- End quote ---

Thanks.

DH wants to work in a pretty specific industry, so "move and get a job" becomes less ideal.  If we had to pick a place where he'd be most likely to find a job, it would be DC, which is where we are now.  I'm open to staying, but it wouldn't be my first choice.

TreeLeaf:

--- Quote from: Villanelle on February 23, 2024, 06:05:28 PM ---
--- Quote from: TreeLeaf on February 23, 2024, 05:51:38 PM ---Typically I get the offer, then negotiate the offer, then after I accept the start date is very flexible. I would say around 2-4 weeks is normal wait for a start date in my field (Software dev). Time to negotiate and accept the offer is usually much shorter - probably 2-5 days in my experience - and I have 'lost' positions because I spent over a week thinking about it (I had multiple offers on the table so no big deal, and probably was not going to accept their offer anyway so it all worked out in the end).

Companies have to fill positions and some of them are not willing to wait for someone to accept an offer. It all sort of depends on the company and hiring manager, etc. I'm not sure if there is any sort of standard or universally accepted answer, and the willingness of a company to wait for someone to accept an offer probably changes as the job market changes as well and is different from industry to industry.

In your shoes I would probably just choose a few cities that seem interesting, and go visit them, then move, then find a job in the new city. But as you might guess I'm an incredible optimist when it comes to finding jobs, which is all based on my own experience in life and not on any sort of empirical data. So I have always chosen the location I want first, then just assumed there will be jobs there that meet my needs.

Good luck. :)

--- End quote ---

Thanks.

DH wants to work in a pretty specific industry, so "move and get a job" becomes less ideal.  If we had to pick a place where he'd be most likely to find a job, it would be DC, which is where we are now.  I'm open to staying, but it wouldn't be my first choice.

--- End quote ---

Hmmm...

Would it be possible to make a list of where you want to live, like say 5 locations with top choice first, then second choice, and so on, then rent an apartment for one month at the first choice, look for jobs there and go sightseeing. If no jobs are found or you don't like it there, go to second choice for a month and so on?

If nothing works out then you can think of it as a long slow travelling vacation and move back to the DC area.

If DH finds a job at one of the locations and you both like it there you can settle down for a while.

ETA: Just some food for thought.
ETA2: It might be useful to know what job DH is looking for but I feel like that may be too personal to ask.

Villanelle:

--- Quote from: TreeLeaf on February 23, 2024, 06:25:51 PM ---
--- Quote from: Villanelle on February 23, 2024, 06:05:28 PM ---
--- Quote from: TreeLeaf on February 23, 2024, 05:51:38 PM ---Typically I get the offer, then negotiate the offer, then after I accept the start date is very flexible. I would say around 2-4 weeks is normal wait for a start date in my field (Software dev). Time to negotiate and accept the offer is usually much shorter - probably 2-5 days in my experience - and I have 'lost' positions because I spent over a week thinking about it (I had multiple offers on the table so no big deal, and probably was not going to accept their offer anyway so it all worked out in the end).

Companies have to fill positions and some of them are not willing to wait for someone to accept an offer. It all sort of depends on the company and hiring manager, etc. I'm not sure if there is any sort of standard or universally accepted answer, and the willingness of a company to wait for someone to accept an offer probably changes as the job market changes as well and is different from industry to industry.

In your shoes I would probably just choose a few cities that seem interesting, and go visit them, then move, then find a job in the new city. But as you might guess I'm an incredible optimist when it comes to finding jobs, which is all based on my own experience in life and not on any sort of empirical data. So I have always chosen the location I want first, then just assumed there will be jobs there that meet my needs.

Good luck. :)

--- End quote ---

Thanks.

DH wants to work in a pretty specific industry, so "move and get a job" becomes less ideal.  If we had to pick a place where he'd be most likely to find a job, it would be DC, which is where we are now.  I'm open to staying, but it wouldn't be my first choice.

--- End quote ---

Hmmm...

Would it be possible to make a list of where you want to live, like say 5 locations with top choice first, then second choice, and so on, then rent an apartment for one month at the first choice, look for jobs there and go sightseeing. If no jobs are found or you don't like it there, go to second choice for a month and so on?

If nothing works out then you can think of it as a long slow travelling vacation and move back to the DC area.

If DH finds a job at one of the locations and you both like it there you can settle down for a while.

ETA: Just some food for thought.
ETA2: It might be useful to know what job DH is looking for but I feel like that may be too personal to ask.

--- End quote ---

He still has a job, and hopes to find another one while he still has this one, so being nomadic for a while won't work.  Tht does sound lovely though!  (I'd rather not post specifics, but it's not so much that the job has specific location, as it is the industry.  Like if someone wanted to be an accountant for medical insurance companies. Not quite a parallel example,  but hopefully gives the gist of it. 

He actually hadn't intended to start the job search quite so early, but he was doing informational interviews and word spread, and people reached out to him.  One company wants to create a roll specifically for him, though there's a few reasons it might not happen.  (And of course the terms might not be what he wants.  We do have FU money, after all!)   

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