Author Topic: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?  (Read 11511 times)

Mutton Chop

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 42
How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« on: February 22, 2015, 09:53:42 AM »
My wife and I are in a position where our consumer debt is going to be gone in a few months after 1.5 years of intense focus.

We're fortunate to have about $15,000-$25,000 in additional income starting this year and paid off $13,000 in debt last year. So positive cash flow of almost $28,000-38,000 annually.

What have you done to prevent lifestyle creep as your debt and lifestyle changes increased your cash flow?

My plan is to automatically transfer money into our retirement and other accounts and continue to live below our current income level.

Zamboni

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2376
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2015, 10:07:52 AM »
^That's what I do and it works pretty well.  You know the maximum amount you need per month right now (you can still optimize to work on getting that amount to go down), so make sure that all of the rest of your money either never makes it into your paycheck via pre-tax contribution or leaves easily accessible accounts within 24 hours of payday.

KD

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 239
  • "Waste is a resource out of place."-Coors Mfg.
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2015, 10:16:29 AM »
Tightly track and budget - use YNAB.  Any leftover $$s which were assigned a job and not spent?  ...at the end of the variable utility bill paying which is confined to narrow window of the month the leftover is skimmed immediately off towards savings and investments.  At the end of each month the household kitty is swept clean except for a small buffer and moved out of the local bank.

i.e.  Any electrictry budget leftover is siphoned off to a solar savings fund which will eventually do away with the bill entirely.  Any grocery dollars leftover is siphoned off to a 'stock up' fund which may or may not be accessed depending on the savings offered at the store.  If the stock market is tanking I'm liable to go long on PB & J, aluminum foil, tuna fish, etc.  Yes, I'm that kind of frugal weird. ;)

iris lily

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3288
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2015, 10:21:57 AM »
This is where I think having a "budget" is silly.

We have never budgeted for categories. For me budgeting just sets an amount of money that you can spend.

Instead, I look at every purchase we make to see if it is in line with my values. I don't give myself $x to spend each month and never have done that.. And that's what budgeting is.

Life is far more interesting when you spend only on the things that bring value to your life. It forces you to look at each "thing" that you bring into you household. Worth it? You will have to dust it, maintain it, fuss with it. Still worth it? 

   
Now I say that and I've always had enough money to cover my needs and the very few wants that I have. And before you think oh she must make a lot of money not true.my first job out of college was making around $11,500 annually but that was a long time ago.

Around age 40 I loosened the purse strings because we were on track to have early retirement money, and I started buying stuff. And ten years later, I jettisoned some of that stuff.

I still have two collections, but I am DONE collecting stuff.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2015, 10:27:52 AM by iris lily »

Davin

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 112
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Eureka, California
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2015, 10:44:55 AM »
I am by no means a high wage earner, but every time I get a raise at work I increase my 401k contribution by a corresponding amount,  so a 3% raise becomes a 3% 401k contribution increase. I also use a technique I call "boiling the frog" where I have my 401k contribution automatically increase by 1% on January first of each year, to slowly bring up my contribution level each year, without any dramatic drops in net income. I have not maxed it out yet, but I get closer every year with no noticeable impacts to my lifestyle. It is like lifestyle creep in reverse.

KD

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 239
  • "Waste is a resource out of place."-Coors Mfg.
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2015, 11:18:20 AM »
iris lily I agree with much of what you say. 

I am naturally frugal and have grown more so as I've aged.  Not everyone is though and even if one spouse is, the other may not be.  I am for budgeting even if it's just a number in your head.  No more than $400 a month on food.  The problem is the creep as the OP was asking about.  If someone is not good at keeping the spent $$s tallied in their head then the creep can set in. 

THAT is why I track & budget. 

You'll notice my response was on utility bills which are variable and groceries, also variable.  I can give myself a ballpark budget and stick to it fairly easily, Hubs not quite as well.  If I give myself $400 on groceries but by careful management only spend $325 this month then off the remainder goes to a bucket for that item.  To be spent at 'stock up' pricing. OVER TIME this has helped me beat inflation.  It took me over 20 years to spend all that aluminum foil I bought at 10 cents a roll on closeout - the whole $2.00 worth.  When it was selling @$3.49 while I was still using my 10 cent rolls I felt pretty good about it.  Fortunately for a lot of those years I had a basement for such kinds of storage.

I believe that not everyone is as gifted as you are in limiting their wants vs. needs.  Even having a pretty tight rein on my spending I have managed to skim from my allotted variable 'budget' items a lot of money over the years allowing me to live a long long time w/o having to touch my investments.

Maybe a silly game, but it's one I enjoy playing.  :)

NaturallyHappier

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 130
  • Age: 53
  • Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
  • FIRED 3/10/2017
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2015, 11:27:33 AM »
Personally, I think avoiding creep is more about how you think about each purchase. 

Every time I am tempted to make a purchase I ask myself, "how is this purchase going to contribute to my happiness and would I be happier FIREing a little earlier instead?"  I also ask myself how often I will use and enjoy the item.  I think about similar purchases and how I enjoyed that item.   

If you do that, you will quickly realize that much of what you buy brings you very little happiness and much of what you buy just sits around and takes up space. 

As for budgeting, I do keep a budget, but I don't really look at it much.  Budgeting for me is more about tracking my spending than curtailing it.

JetsettingWelfareMom

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 63
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2015, 11:40:23 AM »
I try to avoid lifestyle creep by not telling my husband about extra money. It MUST disappear immediately or it will be frittered away on something that we "deserve." So it goes into an account and into my memory hole....this isn't the best way but it's better than it was before!

RapmasterD

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 589
  • Location: SF Peninsula
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2015, 05:46:46 PM »
1) Pay yourself first. Period. Agree on the minimum percentage of take-home pay that you will put away.

2) Ignore what the Joneses are doing.

3) Kick any expensive habits, like....



deborah

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8627
  • Location: Australia or another awesome area
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2015, 06:03:17 PM »
I saved it all - not 50% - every single extra $ I got. When it got difficult (inflation really bites sometimes) I reduced savings by the current inflation rate.

mozar

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2963
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2015, 06:15:45 PM »
I focus on big wins. Like buying a house way below what I could "afford." Not owning a car. I rarely go to restaurants because they bother me for political reasons. I don't own a tv so no need to upgrade. I don't drink alcohol. I have been wanting to add more protein to my diet so I spent an extra $20 today at the grocery store. No big deal.

What I struggle with is wanting to renovate my house (doesn't need it). So I'll research it or make drawings in sketch up. But I have to sit on my hands sometimes so I don't start buying stuff.

Mutton Chop

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 42
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2015, 06:22:01 PM »
1) Pay yourself first. Period. Agree on the minimum percentage of take-home pay that you will put away.

2) Ignore what the Joneses are doing.

3) Kick any expensive habits, like....



Habits like buying ugly suits?! Haha

sandandsun

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 187
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2015, 06:28:46 PM »
I saved it all - not 50% - every single extra $ I got. When it got difficult (inflation really bites sometimes) I reduced savings by the current inflation rate.

This. 
From 40k salary on, put every single dollar of raise into pre-tax retirement accounts (which is 5% and match, then 18k and 18k in 403 and 457 annually)... after that, roth, after that taxable accounts with auto transfers... have let spending creep up a little in travel and food (I'm talking about buying occasional specialty items from places other than Aldi/Sav-a-lot, dining out a couple of times a month) , but still live in same house and drive 10+ yr old cars, so not much creep beyond inflation and a few luxuries here and there...
The key is to not get into the mindset of "you deserve it."  You don't deserve anything other than having basic needs met.  You have a good job and are in a position to save since you have more than you need- it may not always be that way, so take advantage of the situation while it lasts...

Exhale

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 824
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2015, 06:43:26 PM »
I refer myself to MMM's post re: spending now equals stealing from your future self. So, the only "extra" spending I do is health related re: healthy food, good shoes for exercise, etc. I consider those purchases investments (in my current and future health). I'm not saying it's always easy, but it's what works for me.


waltworks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3263
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2015, 06:46:43 PM »
Find activities that are so fun they start to consume your time and attention - that don't cost much/any money. Anything outdoors probably works (ie running/cycling/birdwatching/hiking/whatever) as do many fitness activities. Chess, bridge, etc on the intellectual end of things.

Your desire to have cable TV/TV at all will drop to zero. You will stop caring what kind of car you drive. You will get more awesome at some stuff and save money at the same time.

-W

kiwigirls

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 162
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2015, 06:49:44 PM »
Sounds like a plan.  I would have a celebration when you finally pay off the debt (ie dinner out or nice bottle of wine).  Then as you suggest put every extra dollar into your retirement accounts/savings accounts.  Trick yourself into thinking you are still earning the original amount & live on your original budget.  Of course its easier said than done - my hubby and I will be good for a while and then we relax and just start spending a little bit more....  Luckily we tend to pull each other up before it goes too far & we refocus on living within our budget.  Other things we do to avoid lifestyle creep is don't move house (then you aren't tempted to buy bigger) and most of our friends/neighbours spend about the same level as us.  ie we don't tend to hang out with people who go to the mall as a social occasion or eat out at high end restaurants all the time.

shuffler

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 322
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2015, 07:15:08 PM »
My plan is to automatically transfer money into our retirement and other accounts ...
All of my paycheck goes directly into my brokerage account.  And then my brokerage transfers a set amount to my checking account twice a month.

The advantage is never having to think about any of this stuff.

If I get a raise, all of it automatically stays in my brokerage.
If I get a yearly bonus, all of it automatically stays in my brokerage.
If I set my 401k to front-load early in the year (50% of paycheck, and yes my employer still matches the full amount), then it doesn't affect how much money I get in my checking account; I still get the regular transfers.

IOW, I've completely decoupled my checking account from my paycheck.

If I wanted to increase my lifestyle, I'd have to go adjust the amount of the regular transfers from brokerage -> checking.
If I want to avoid lifestyle creep, I just leave the transfers at the same amount.

Dimitri

  • Guest
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2015, 07:27:46 PM »
I think it is very simple.  Try to spend no more in any category you track (grocery, household, electric, etc.) than you spent the previous year.  If you are successful you have won the game.  If you aren't (and the increase is no more than the inflation rate) then you are hanging on.  Otherwise, you are experiencing lifestyle creep.

iris lily

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3288
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2015, 07:54:01 PM »
iris lily I agree with much of what you say. 

I am naturally frugal and have grown more so as I've aged.  Not everyone is though and even if one spouse is, the other may not be.  I am for budgeting even if it's just a number in your head.  No more than $400 a month on food.  The problem is the creep as the OP was asking about.  If someone is not good at keeping the spent $$s tallied in their head then the creep can set in. 

THAT is why I track & budget. 

You'll notice my response was on utility bills which are variable and groceries, also variable.  I can give myself a ballpark budget and stick to it fairly easily, Hubs not quite as well.  If I give myself $400 on groceries but by careful management only spend $325 this month then off the remainder goes to a bucket for that item.  To be spent at 'stock up' pricing. OVER TIME this has helped me beat inflation.  It took me over 20 years to spend all that aluminum foil I bought at 10 cents a roll on closeout - the whole $2.00 worth.  When it was selling @$3.49 while I was still using my 10 cent rolls I felt pretty good about it.  Fortunately for a lot of those years I had a basement for such kinds of storage.

I believe that not everyone is as gifted as you are in limiting their wants vs. needs.  Even having a pretty tight rein on my spending I have managed to skim from my allotted variable 'budget' items a lot of money over the years allowing me to live a long long time w/o having to touch my investments.

Maybe a silly game, but it's one I enjoy playing.  :)



Hey, I don't even BUY aluminum foil, or rather , I didn't buy it for decades Hahaha! When I host a potluck party I always ended up with pieces leftover from other people. Also paper towels, I hate to use them and while I do have a roll in the kitchen, we use them almost exclusively for cooking bacon.

Sadly, DH is addicted to Saran wrap and we go through several rolls a year. :(

But back to topic--I think tracking is very smart because you see your spending trends. I don't do it, but I think it's a good idea and I view that as a separate thing from budgeting.

« Last Edit: February 22, 2015, 10:02:09 PM by iris lily »

daymare

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 463
  • Age: 29
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2015, 08:44:22 PM »
I would say just tracking spending - I use mint and then manually enter everything into my personal monthly spreadsheet.  If you do this, you will notice if spending increases, and have the opportunity to evaluate whether that's intentional and making your life better, or if it's due to laziness or neglect and not enriching your life.  Then you can change your behavior.

I've found that, with time, old costly habits got less appealing, and instead watching my investments rise has been very rewarding.

Dee18

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1610
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2015, 09:55:56 AM »
I use the "30 day rule" for non-food purchases, and have taught my teen to do the same.  If I think I want something, I write it in a little notebook.  If I still really want it 30 days later, I can purchase it.  Most of the time, the desire has waned by then.  Sometimes the item is no longer available. 

mjs111

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 238
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2015, 10:09:13 AM »
I track my expenses every year, picking one month out of the year to record every expense, then compare that to previous years, seeing what changed. If there's noticeable creeping up in expenses it's pretty easy to see, and I decide what to do about it.  Some things just get more expensive over time due to inflation, some things I honestly want to spend a bit more money on and don't mind the added expense, and some things I didn't consciously realize I had increased spending on and can find ways to reduce.

Mike


Elliot

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 285
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2015, 10:26:53 AM »
Whenever I get any type of pay increase, I increase my retirement contribution by that amount. When I hit max (in a few years) I'll probably do something similar, just in a non tax-advantaged account.

When my partner finishes school and gets a big kid job, that's when I worry. Currently about half our take home pay goes to tuition/fees/etc, and then add in a real job salary, we'll be pretty well set. We currently plan to bring retirement contributions up to max, then save for a house downpayment, pay the house off (nearly)ASAP. My nervouseness comes in knowing that I DO want some lifestyle creep after we becaome truly dual-income, mostly in travel, but also in a couple other areas.  I'm just nervous I won't know when to stop.


catccc

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1681
  • Location: SE PA
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2015, 10:48:59 AM »
Like a lot of people here, I really strive to put anything extra away immediately.  Small change in paycheck due to change in benefit withholdings, even a measly $1.50 means I increase my automatic transfer to savings by the same amount.

I still have had some lifestyle creep.  But not much.

YNAB, which I started using in late 2013, is helping a lot.  Sometimes unexpected larger amounts coming in get thrown into vacation use (that's lifestyle creep), but more often than not, I assign it to a savings goal right away.

What's tougher for me is smaller amounts- $20 here or there... I have a tendency to shore up low budget categories with these amounts.  Pretty much every month I am doing this with tiny sums for ebay sales or whatever.

lifejoy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3963
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Canada, eh
  • Lovin' the Mustachian life!
    • Not Buying This
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2015, 10:55:41 AM »
I read FI blogs and watch Til Debt do us Part. I try to focus on what I have, instead of what I don't. I budget and use mint.

Many people will say they don't budget, they just buy things carefully and consciously or whatever. I can't do that. I need a budget because otherwise I will rationalize every "want" as a "need".

Imustacheyouaquestion

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 257
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2015, 10:58:08 AM »
Increase your retirement contributions if you're not at the max already, or you can set up an automated savings allotment with either your bank or your employer. Whatever you were paying towards the debt every month can be automatically transferred into a savings account or automatically invested with a brokerage so that you never see the difference in your monthly cash available.

FIreDrill

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1039
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2015, 11:09:50 AM »
My wife and I are maxing out our 401k's so that is 36k a year that comes straight out of our paychecks (43k if you include match).  I am more than content with what we have and adding anything else to our lives would just clutter it up more.  I find saving goals fun so any extra we have usually goes towards IRA's, mortgage payoff, or taxable investments.  Lifestyle inflation hasn't been an issue for us ever since saving has became a fun game to eventually be free from work all together.

Gone Fishing

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2754
  • So Close went fishing on April 1, 2016
    • Journal
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2015, 11:48:33 AM »
1) Pay yourself first. Period. Agree on the minimum percentage of take-home pay that you will put away.

2) Ignore what the Joneses are doing.

3) Kick any expensive habits, like....



Habits like buying ugly suits?! Haha

I think the OP was referring to buying jewelry!

Seriously though, be sure to keep a lid on the creep.  We crept quite a bit and then pulled back, and it wasn't easy.  I still get little urges to buy "stuff" that I really don't need.  Keeping the goal in sight is the most important part for me.  Right now my strategy is to just buy the basics and save the rest.       
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 11:53:46 AM by So Close »

Unique User

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 648
  • Location: NC
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2015, 03:28:24 PM »
Having the money come out automatically is key.  We've had some creep, but as long as we stay on track with maxing all our accounts, I'm not that worried.  But, we're right at the limit of maxing everything so any other raises would need to be dealt with, I'm investigating the mega backdoor roth for this very reason!

lifejoy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3963
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Canada, eh
  • Lovin' the Mustachian life!
    • Not Buying This
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2015, 07:24:41 AM »
I surround myself with people that are good at avoiding lifestyle creep. My family and friends keep me grounded, and my husband's coworkers make my jaw drop! But it's hard to resist the lifestyle of your peers, so be sure to make many of your peers Mustachian :)

begood

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 966
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2015, 07:47:20 AM »
I surround myself with people that are good at avoiding lifestyle creep. My family and friends keep me grounded, and my husband's coworkers make my jaw drop! But it's hard to resist the lifestyle of your peers, so be sure to make many of your peers Mustachian :)

Compared to my current cohort, I'm Al Pacino covered in blow. They, along with you fine folks and MMM, really opened my eyes. I still feel like a bit of an outlier, based on what we drive and how we vacation, but I really am quite happy to spend an evening with those folks hanging out, playing a board game, watching a DVD, rather than going out for dinner + drinks or a movie. I love my Mustachian peers. :)

nobody123

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 524
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2015, 08:19:43 AM »
When I get a raise, I let 1% get added to my take home pay and I increase my 401k deferral by the remainder.  I have done that the majority of my career and it's worked fine.  I've also always had a "big" goal to work towards (house, car, fancy vacation, etc.), so I have that to judge any discretionary purchase against.

We have a general budget where we track certain key items for us, and those are what we focus on reducing spend on for the year.  EOY, we see how we did, adjust amounts, and pick the areas of focus for the upcoming year.  After we agree that we're spending an acceptable to us amount on a line item, we just fold it into our 'variable expenses' line item.  I used to track 40+ line items to the penny every month, but it got tedious and my wife was disinterested in doing it at that level.  We do have line items in the budget for savings (new car, house maintenance, vacation, etc.), and those are the lines that get increased to absorb the extra 1% I allow after a pay increase.

Guizmo

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 263
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2015, 08:21:08 AM »
1) Pay yourself first. Period. Agree on the minimum percentage of take-home pay that you will put away.

2) Ignore what the Joneses are doing.

3) Kick any expensive habits, like....



Habits like buying ugly suits?! Haha

I think the OP was referring to buying jewelry!

Seriously though, be sure to keep a lid on the creep.  We crept quite a bit and then pulled back, and it wasn't easy.  I still get little urges to buy "stuff" that I really don't need.  Keeping the goal in sight is the most important part for me.  Right now my strategy is to just buy the basics and save the rest.     

No, I think it's the bag of flour in front of him. Do you all not see that! He's not even in a kitchen! How wasteful!

Jon_Snow

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2948
  • Location: An Island in the Salish Sea (or Baja)
  • In Baja....there is no kale.
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2015, 10:35:28 AM »
Avoiding "lifestyle creep" was the biggest factor in achieving FIRE for us. Our family income at 42 was twice that of when we were 32. But expenses actually went down over those ten years while our income doubled. That is a sure recipe for FIRE. And it was.

lifejoy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3963
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Canada, eh
  • Lovin' the Mustachian life!
    • Not Buying This
Re: How did you personally avoid lifestyle creep?
« Reply #34 on: February 26, 2015, 11:12:13 PM »

1) Pay yourself first. Period. Agree on the minimum percentage of take-home pay that you will put away.

2) Ignore what the Joneses are doing.

3) Kick any expensive habits, like....



Habits like buying ugly suits?! Haha

I think the OP was referring to buying jewelry!

Seriously though, be sure to keep a lid on the creep.  We crept quite a bit and then pulled back, and it wasn't easy.  I still get little urges to buy "stuff" that I really don't need.  Keeping the goal in sight is the most important part for me.  Right now my strategy is to just buy the basics and save the rest.     

No, I think it's the bag of flour in front of him. Do you all not see that! He's not even in a kitchen! How wasteful!

(Best series of posts ever.)

I bet he doesn't even cut his own hair.