Author Topic: How are you adapting to inflation?  (Read 7816 times)

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #50 on: February 15, 2022, 08:54:20 AM »
To be honest, even with 5 mouths to feed, I never even look at food prices. If you mostly eat produce and grains, food is so stupid cheap that price changes are just totally irrelevant. I guess I notice the price of avocados because it's a discreet unit, but I buy them when they're 50 cents and also when they're $2.00, doesn't matter much.
-W

Indeed, the relative price of food at home has dropped by more than 50% in the last 60 years.

https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/chart-gallery/gallery/chart-detail/?chartId=78028

Not to nitpick, but the graph is of "per capita disposable income spent on food".  Disposable income also increased significantly from 1960 to 2013.  It doesn't show 2022 which could be the first time that there is a significant reversal in this trend...

Currently food costs have increased significantly while buying the same items in our household, but raises are supposed to outpace inflation this year also. 

It would be really interesting, in aggregate, to see if % disposable income remains flat (either through substitution / skipping avocados) or wages outpacing inflation.  I get the impression that people are generally going to be OK this year, absorbing the initial vestiges of inflation, but could begin to struggle more and more over time.

waltworks

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #51 on: February 15, 2022, 09:33:30 AM »
Food inflation has run about 3%/year over the last 100 years, so pretty close to the same as general inflation.

But incomes have skyrocketed in that same timeframe, so the portion of income spent on food (as per the chart) has declined dramatically.

-W
« Last Edit: February 15, 2022, 11:42:06 AM by waltworks »

YttriumNitrate

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #52 on: February 15, 2022, 10:22:15 AM »
Not to nitpick, but the graph is of "per capita disposable income spent on food".  Disposable income also increased significantly from 1960 to 2013.  It doesn't show 2022 which could be the first time that there is a significant reversal in this trend...
Yes, that's why I described it as the relative price of food dropping by more than 50%.

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #53 on: February 15, 2022, 02:19:34 PM »
Not to nitpick, but the graph is of "per capita disposable income spent on food".  Disposable income also increased significantly from 1960 to 2013.  It doesn't show 2022 which could be the first time that there is a significant reversal in this trend...
Yes, that's why I described it as the relative price of food dropping by more than 50%.
Ah that makes sense, I misinterpreted what was meant by relative...  Also, I was wondering where @waltworks got the 3% figure on food inflation.  Obviously higher during high inflation times and lower during the mechanization and conglomerization of farms.  Also depends on what is considered 'food' - Twinkies?  Taco Bell?  Or fresh fruit / produce and grass fed free range animals??

Edit to add - Wow, the CPI gets really detailed on food! - https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.t02.htm
« Last Edit: February 15, 2022, 02:25:48 PM by EscapeVelocity2020 »

Psychstache

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #54 on: February 15, 2022, 02:40:38 PM »
To be honest, even with 5 mouths to feed, I never even look at food prices. If you mostly eat produce and grains, food is so stupid cheap that price changes are just totally irrelevant. I guess I notice the price of avocados because it's a discreet unit, but I buy them when they're 50 cents and also when they're $2.00, doesn't matter much.

-W

+1. I go to store with a list and buy the list.

Cranky

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #55 on: February 16, 2022, 01:35:23 PM »
Todayís Aldi trip was interesting! First of all, they were *much* better stocked than Iíve seen since sometime last fall. The only thing on my list I couldnít find was cream cheese, but I still have a spare anyway.

(And the flowers were really crummy, but I suppose thatís Valentineís Day related?)

Prices are coming down! I really noticed it with the meat. Salami, which has been over $5, was $3.39. Even the fresh meat was all down a bit. The Aisle of Stuff was fully stocked, too.

So maybe things are starting to move a bit better?


BlueMR2

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #56 on: February 16, 2022, 05:29:32 PM »
I wonder where you are and what you're making it with - perhaps local costs really are that much higher, but if that were the case I wouldn't think ordering it would be cheaper. My general is close to what others have said - $1.50 or $2 a pizza (not including the fuel to cook it) and I use brand name bread flour (King Arthur), brand name canned tomatoes (Muir Glen usually), and other not-particularly inexpensive ingredients. Now if you're making 5 or 6 pizzas, I could see spending the $20 to make it at home, including having to buy a whole bag of flour because you don't usually use it and a new bottle of olive oil - but those generally contain enough to make multiple batches of pizza. (A 5 lb bag of flour will make about 16 pizzas; said bag of flour costs $7.50 at the most expensive store around but more like $4.50 at a normal store)

Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #57 on: February 17, 2022, 08:52:15 AM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk

clarkfan1979

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #58 on: February 17, 2022, 09:10:04 AM »
Iím wondering what sorts of contrarian hacks Mustachians have developed to address the inflationary time weíre living in?  Ways of reducing consumption?  Adjusting what goods you buy?  I realize that basic MMM habits are good at times like these, but whatís been helpful in particular?

I'm keeping my spending habits the same and thus my expenses for personal consumption will go up. I raised the rent on my rentals to account for my increased spending on personal consumption. No real change here. 

Cassie

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #59 on: February 17, 2022, 09:35:57 AM »
When I divorced a year ago my income was cut in half. We sold the house and I bought a condo with a small mortgage. Rents are skyrocketing here so owning was key to being able to stay here.  I spend 150/month on groceries by shopping at Winco and buy whatever I want. Being 67 I donít eat as much as I used to. My son found me a T-Mobile plan for 15/month, YouTube tv instead of cable and put led bulbs everywhere which lowered the electric bill by 10.

 I only go through a tank of gas a month.  My car is a 2008 Toyota Corolla with 68k miles so probably my last car. My priorities are taking trips and having money to spend on medical care for my 2 Maltese.  I have really gotten cold since getting older so keep the heat at 73. Itís included in my condo fee.

affordablehousing

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #60 on: February 17, 2022, 11:16:45 AM »
We're picking up more stuff on the street. Just last night I convinced my spouse to be ok with picking up someone's thrown out cookies that tasted fine but I guess they didn't like. It has been a challenge to get them to allow me to pick up street food. I now try to only acquire clothes I find on the street rather than go to Goodwill, and we haven't bought anything for the kids to play with in a year. The streets near us have more books than the library and more free toys in people's garbage than at preschool.

Cranky

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #61 on: February 17, 2022, 01:25:37 PM »
We're picking up more stuff on the street. Just last night I convinced my spouse to be ok with picking up someone's thrown out cookies that tasted fine but I guess they didn't like. It has been a challenge to get them to allow me to pick up street food. I now try to only acquire clothes I find on the street rather than go to Goodwill, and we haven't bought anything for the kids to play with in a year. The streets near us have more books than the library and more free toys in people's garbage than at preschool.

We got a doorknob that we needed out of a trash pile this week. LOL Free is my favorite price.

BlueMR2

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #62 on: February 17, 2022, 02:48:53 PM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk

I don't think you've bought ingredients recently.  Those prices are a normal jar of sauce, bag of pepperoni, and medium bag of cheese pre-recent inflation, not any huge amount.  It'll make a pizza slightly smaller than a baking sheet and by no means overflowing with toppings.

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #63 on: February 17, 2022, 02:51:34 PM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk


OMG that video. Thanks for sharing the link . . . maybe?

jnw

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #64 on: February 17, 2022, 03:56:30 PM »
We make pizza here with stuff we normally already have on hand.  Mozzarella cheese, bacon, tomato paste, individual spices: oregano, basil, onion powder, garlic powder; olive oil.    We don't have to buy anythign special.   And it comes to less than $2 for a medium size pizza (enough food for the both of us and the dog).   

We make just enough sauce with say a heaping tbsp of tomato paste .. we porrtion the tomato paste with plastic wrap and baggy and freeze.  It's like 8 cents of tomato paste.  Sprinkle in a little oregano , basil, onion powder, black pwpper, garlic powder and a drizzle of olvie oil into the sauce... add like 15 cents more for the spices and oil.  So like 23 cents for the sauce for the entire pizza, and nothing extra to buy.

We use bacon for our pizza topping.. about 4 slices cut up into pieces and friend 1/2 way before topping.   We always have bacon here.  Now we are making our own bacon for $1.58 /lb out of pork butt and pork loin.  So the bacon cost is like what 35 cents, for the amount we use. 

We also top with very thinly sliced white onion, the remainder of which we wrap in plastic wrap and throw in veggie bin, preserving the onion for weeks for other meals.  The same with green bell pepper if we also use that for topping.

We also top with a bit of basil from our garden which we food process with olive oil and freeze into ice cubes.  Has a fresh basil taste and costs next to nothing since we grew it here in the summer.

I challenge you to figure out a way to make pizzas for under $3 -- or $4 depending on size of pizza.  Because many of us here are already doing it.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2022, 04:03:41 PM by JenniferW »

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #65 on: February 17, 2022, 05:18:21 PM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk

I don't think you've bought ingredients recently.  Those prices are a normal jar of sauce, bag of pepperoni, and medium bag of cheese pre-recent inflation, not any huge amount.  It'll make a pizza slightly smaller than a baking sheet and by no means overflowing with toppings.

Bought ingredients last week. I make my own sauce ($1.19/can of diced tomatoes, Muir Glen). A bag of sliced pepperoni is $2.50; it's got enough pepperoni in it for about 6 pizzas. An 8 oz bag of shredded cheese (enough cheese for 2-3 pizzas) costs $4 for the name brand not on sale (but is normally on sale); fresh mozzarella is $7 for a pound. My pizzas are 12" across, so probably 1.5 of mine is one of yours.

Are you buying ingredients at a 7-11 or similar convenience store? I'm not trying to be snarky at all; I am honestly mystified at the prices you're citing. And if the prices are reflective of the area you live in, buying pizza at a pizzeria must be about $50. If it's cheaper to buy pizza from the pizzeria than to make it yourself there's something very very very far off.

Cranky

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #66 on: February 17, 2022, 06:45:14 PM »
I make pizza for lunch about once/week, and agree that those are Manhattan food prices, maybe? Even there, shop around. Aldi has a big bag of grated mozzarella for around $3, and you can buy cheese on sale and freeze it.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #67 on: February 18, 2022, 08:09:01 AM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk
I don't think you've bought ingredients recently.  Those prices are a normal jar of sauce, bag of pepperoni, and medium bag of cheese pre-recent inflation, not any huge amount.  It'll make a pizza slightly smaller than a baking sheet and by no means overflowing with toppings.

Normally, I would shop at Aldi where prices are a bit lower, but they don't post their prices online so I had to go with WalMart.

A quart to half a gallon of tomato sauce
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Pizza-Sauce-23-9-oz/944712101
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Prego-Pizza-Sauce-Pizzeria-Style-14-Ounce-Jar/40601572

2-3 pounds of mozzarella
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Shredded-Mozzarella-Cheese-Low-Moisture-Part-Skim-16-oz/10452421
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Kraft-Mozzarella-Shredded-Cheese-16-oz-Bag/43981976
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Gluten-Free-Low-Moisture-Part-Skim-Shredded-Mozzarella-Cheese-5-lb/39171185 ($3.20 a pound when you buy 5 pounds)

A pound of pepperoni
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Original-Pepperoni-Slices-21-oz/483646515
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Original-Pepperoni-Slices-6-oz/40495518

Flour
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-All-Purpose-Flour-5LB-Bag/10403017?athbdg=L1200

jnw

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #68 on: February 18, 2022, 10:29:56 AM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk
I don't think you've bought ingredients recently.  Those prices are a normal jar of sauce, bag of pepperoni, and medium bag of cheese pre-recent inflation, not any huge amount.  It'll make a pizza slightly smaller than a baking sheet and by no means overflowing with toppings.

Normally, I would shop at Aldi where prices are a bit lower, but they don't post their prices online so I had to go with WalMart.

A quart to half a gallon of tomato sauce
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Pizza-Sauce-23-9-oz/944712101
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Prego-Pizza-Sauce-Pizzeria-Style-14-Ounce-Jar/40601572

2-3 pounds of mozzarella
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Shredded-Mozzarella-Cheese-Low-Moisture-Part-Skim-16-oz/10452421
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Kraft-Mozzarella-Shredded-Cheese-16-oz-Bag/43981976
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Gluten-Free-Low-Moisture-Part-Skim-Shredded-Mozzarella-Cheese-5-lb/39171185 ($3.20 a pound when you buy 5 pounds)

A pound of pepperoni
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Original-Pepperoni-Slices-21-oz/483646515
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Original-Pepperoni-Slices-6-oz/40495518

Flour
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-All-Purpose-Flour-5LB-Bag/10403017?athbdg=L1200

How many pizzas could you make with all that?

Dicey

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #69 on: February 18, 2022, 10:50:02 AM »
Sauce runs $3-4.  A couple bucks for ingredients to make the crust.  Pepperoni is around $5.  I'll kill a whole $10ish bag of cheese on it.  It's delicious, but not cost effective.
2-3 pounds of cheese, a pound of pepperoni, a quart to half a gallon of sauce, a few pounds of flour...

So basically, you're trying to recreate the Epic Meal pizza:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXpxBe6Amhk
I don't think you've bought ingredients recently.  Those prices are a normal jar of sauce, bag of pepperoni, and medium bag of cheese pre-recent inflation, not any huge amount.  It'll make a pizza slightly smaller than a baking sheet and by no means overflowing with toppings.

Normally, I would shop at Aldi where prices are a bit lower, but they don't post their prices online so I had to go with WalMart.

A quart to half a gallon of tomato sauce
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Pizza-Sauce-23-9-oz/944712101
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Prego-Pizza-Sauce-Pizzeria-Style-14-Ounce-Jar/40601572

2-3 pounds of mozzarella
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Shredded-Mozzarella-Cheese-Low-Moisture-Part-Skim-16-oz/10452421
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Kraft-Mozzarella-Shredded-Cheese-16-oz-Bag/43981976
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Gluten-Free-Low-Moisture-Part-Skim-Shredded-Mozzarella-Cheese-5-lb/39171185 ($3.20 a pound when you buy 5 pounds)

A pound of pepperoni
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Original-Pepperoni-Slices-21-oz/483646515
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Original-Pepperoni-Slices-6-oz/40495518

Flour
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-All-Purpose-Flour-5LB-Bag/10403017?athbdg=L1200

How many pizzas could you make with all that?
Enough for all of us. Yum!

I have to laugh though. I shop at the kind of stores that sell whatever they get deals on, not the kind that have the same thing in the same place 24/7/365. Therefore, my costs are even lower, because I don't buy everything at the same time. I literally always have these ingredients on hand. Including yeast, ahem.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #70 on: February 18, 2022, 11:17:11 AM »
How many pizzas could you make with all that?
Just one, but it's a heck of a pizza.

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #71 on: February 18, 2022, 12:21:20 PM »
So what I'm getting from this thread is that I'm going to be eating a lot of pizza until the Fed manages to tame inflation?  Sounds good to me!

jnw

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #72 on: February 18, 2022, 01:15:44 PM »
So what I'm getting from this thread is that I'm going to be eating a lot of pizza until the Fed manages to tame inflation?  Sounds good to me!

LMAO :)

Captain FIRE

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #73 on: February 18, 2022, 01:17:59 PM »
Y'all making pizzas are skimpy on ingredients.  Isn't one benefit of cooking at home that you can load it up?!

For two of us, we do 5 or even 6 slices of bacon (no "2-3 slices" here) ($2 for 1/3 a package?), 1/2 an apple (50 cents?) and some slices of red onion for our go to pizza.  And most of a bag of pre-shredded* cheese ($2.50? 3? on sale) because divorce is expensive, plus flour etc.  So I'm somewhere between the $1.50 and $15-20 estimates.  Still cheaper than ordering pizza though.

*Using pre-shredded cheese is a compromise with spouse on certain cooking efforts. He does not feel the effort is worth the cost of grating ourselves.  Since I get resentful at doing 100% of the things he deems as non-essential (this ranges from cleaning to cooking), I have compromised in some areas.

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #74 on: February 18, 2022, 01:54:41 PM »
Definitely NOT skimping on ingredients here, though I think it's all a matter of perspective.

LOL on "most of a bag of cheese because divorce is expensive" - love it.

Oooh apple on the pizza. Haven't done that one yet. The best surprise pizza we've made recently was fig preserves with goat cheese and sliced fresh jalopenos. We were in a rental house where the owners said "use what you find in the fridge" so we did. OMG.

jnw

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #75 on: February 18, 2022, 02:27:55 PM »
Put whatever you want on your pizza, it comes out to 25% or less compared to buying the pizza from a joint :)

Captain FIRE

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #76 on: February 18, 2022, 07:52:18 PM »
Definitely NOT skimping on ingredients here, though I think it's all a matter of perspective.

LOL on "most of a bag of cheese because divorce is expensive" - love it.

Oooh apple on the pizza. Haven't done that one yet. The best surprise pizza we've made recently was fig preserves with goat cheese and sliced fresh jalopenos. We were in a rental house where the owners said "use what you find in the fridge" so we did. OMG.

People kept talking about "thin slices" of this or that, or just a few slices of bacon etc.

We stole the recipe from a restaurant.  No pizza sauce - just moz cheese, apple, bacon, red onion.  It's delicious :) 

Omy

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #77 on: February 19, 2022, 07:20:24 AM »
What spices? I'm hungry...

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #78 on: February 19, 2022, 07:26:56 AM »
best adder to our pizza is what we call crack.

Mix 1/3 c olive oil with 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes and 4 cloves of garlic, crushed. Heat this gently until you can smell the garlic, then turn it off. Brush this on the pizza before any sauce or toppings. Makes enough crack for 5-6 pizzas.

Obviously doesn't work if you don't like garlic.

jnw

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #79 on: February 19, 2022, 07:47:12 AM »
best adder to our pizza is what we call crack.

Mix 1/3 c olive oil with 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes and 4 cloves of garlic, crushed. Heat this gently until you can smell the garlic, then turn it off. Brush this on the pizza before any sauce or toppings. Makes enough crack for 5-6 pizzas.

Obviously doesn't work if you don't like garlic.

That sounds insanely good :) I'll give it a go.  (We already sprinkle top of pizza with crushed red pepper and garlic powder.  Also we drizzle olive oil into the sauce :)

Fishindude

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #80 on: February 19, 2022, 09:31:06 AM »
Not much you can do about inflation other than suck it up and move ahead.
You've been dealing with inflation your entire life.   Heck gas was $0.39 per gallon when I started driving, and my first new car was $5800.

jnw

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #81 on: February 19, 2022, 10:34:27 AM »
All the more reason to buy used stuff when you can. I notice the used prices people are selling stuff on Facebook Marketplace are based of what they paid for the item pre-inflation.   e.g. Weber 22" One Touch Gold Kettle is $199 now at the store, just a few short years ago it was $149.  I see them all the time for $50 on Facebook Marketplace, same as it was years ago.

I am doing everything I can to battle this inflation by buying used stuff.  Or products that haven't inflated in price such as cases of pork butt and pork loin at Sam's Club.   Making about 16 lbs of bacon right now with them -- buckboard and canadian bacon.   Will smoke it all at same time in my Weber Smokey Mountain.   Will taste better than the $6/lb bacon, at only $1.58/lb.

I am battling this inflation and I will win!  However, I can't keep the utilities companies from charging more so that's annoying.. so trying to be more efficient with electricity, etc..
« Last Edit: February 19, 2022, 10:37:08 AM by JenniferW »

mistymoney

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #82 on: February 19, 2022, 11:23:26 AM »
just when I think I've adapted to the "new" prices, they go up again.

clarkfan1979

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #83 on: February 20, 2022, 08:20:45 AM »
I make pizza for lunch about once/week, and agree that those are Manhattan food prices, maybe? Even there, shop around. Aldi has a big bag of grated mozzarella for around $3, and you can buy cheese on sale and freeze it.

I buy the 5 lb. bag of mozzarella cheese from Costco/Sams Club. It's 2.75/lb. I also buy 4 packs of pepperoni pizza for $10.99. I think the cheese only one is $9.99. I sprinkle an extra 3-4 ounces of cheese on top. I'm around $3.25-3.50/pizza, made to my liking. 

stoaX

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #84 on: February 20, 2022, 10:07:59 AM »
By spending more money!

Same here. The biggest dollar increases in costs for us have been property taxes (because the value of the house has gone up) and health insurance (even after ACA subsidies).  The only solution would be to move... but moving would generate expenses greater than the increases in taxes and health insurance.

Damned if you do, damned if you don't...

Sibley

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #85 on: February 20, 2022, 11:17:45 AM »
I find the whole pizza discussion hilarious. I don't make pizza from scratch. I buy the Aldi's frozen pizzas. I'm perfectly happy with it, its reasonably priced and easy. Pizza is often the "I'm really struggling to eat right now so the easiest thing I can figure out that will fill me up that I can actually manage to eat" go to, so making it from scratch defeats the purpose. Disordered eating is a bitch sometimes, and it's been tough the last couple months. Its getting better finally. Of course, the reason it's getting better is I adopted a 2nd cat, so that adds expense.

My grocery list this week is funny. My freezer stash of meats is depleted, so I'd like to restock. Chicken, beef, pork chops. Might get a ham and split it with my parents too. I don't technically need to get all of it, but stock has been a factor so if they have what I want I'll just suck it up.

LightStache

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #86 on: February 26, 2022, 12:20:24 PM »
Here in SoCal the ubiquitous Ralph's grocery is selling medium pizzas for $5. It's terrible for you but still affordable. Trader Joe's salads, my lunchtime staple, can still be had for $5 too.

But I spent way too much on restaurant food before crazy inflation and now I'm just spending more. It's always been the #1 weak spot in my budgeting.

The only change I've made is to start plugging in my hybrid at work. It's still the same $1/hr. With gas prices above $4/gal now it makes economic sense to charge up.

I also was considering buying a new-to-me-car because my Fusion Energi is terrible in the mountains. But I think I've decided to just rent anytime I'm going to be in snowy conditions and I'll get better tires the next time I'm due for replacement.

Villanelle

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #87 on: February 26, 2022, 04:49:53 PM »
Iím being pretty careful about the groceries at this point. There just arenít many bargains to be had at this point!

And we turned the thermostat down to 66į, at which temperature Iím cold all the time, but I was outvoted on this. Luckily I bought electric throws last winter!

Otherwise, our housing costs are stable and we donít need a new car. We donít drive all that much so gas prices donít affect us too much.

Long walks and the library continue to be free.

We keep our thermostat at 63 during the day, but have a space heater in the main living space, which is much cheaper than heating the entire house.  Would something like that work for you? 

Cranky

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #88 on: February 27, 2022, 05:57:35 AM »
I donít think so - itís a good sized space to heat and I think it would suck up more electricity than itís worth.

Weíre getting new windows this summer, which will help with costs, but honestly, at 66į Iím always going to be Too Cold.

Iíve got on about 5 layers already. Iím warmer when we go out for a walk and its 15į!

Imma

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #89 on: February 27, 2022, 06:22:38 AM »
As a low-consumption vegan who doesn't buy most of the high-inflation categories at all, it really has not been an issue for me so far. If I was having problems with inflation, I would just lean harder into anticonsumption/zero waste. It's worth keeping in mind that there are many people at every point in the spending spectrum, including people who spend $0, so unless you're already spending $0/year, you always have options and the ability to spend less if you choose to.

We are very low-consumption too, but inflation is still influencing us quite a bit. Of course, cutting back is always an option, but I'm really noticing inflation across the board, not just in luxury items.

Our property tax has gone up about 15% this year, and we already live in a location that has relatively low taxes.

Public transit is "only" 2% more expensive than last year, and got 2% more expensive in 2020 as well. That seems pretty low. Until you start to notice that most buses and trains run 2 times per hour now instead of 4, due to lower amounts of passengers due to Covid / WFH. And they start running later in the day. I think the earliest bus in my neighbourhood is now 6.30am instead of 5.30am. And right before the pandemic, VAT on public transit was raised (from 6 to 9%) which resulted in an average 5% increase in price. All in all we're getting half of the amount of buses and trains for a 10% higher price than pre-Covid.

Another staple that has doubled in price since the pandemic are 1 pound bags of oats, that used to cost me Ä0,30 but are now Ä0,69.

Still, we're doing more than OK. We've both got a few raises that more than compensate the higher prices.

stoaX

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #90 on: February 27, 2022, 08:17:43 AM »
As a low-consumption vegan who doesn't buy most of the high-inflation categories at all, it really has not been an issue for me so far. If I was having problems with inflation, I would just lean harder into anticonsumption/zero waste. It's worth keeping in mind that there are many people at every point in the spending spectrum, including people who spend $0, so unless you're already spending $0/year, you always have options and the ability to spend less if you choose to.

We are very low-consumption too, but inflation is still influencing us quite a bit. Of course, cutting back is always an option, but I'm really noticing inflation across the board, not just in luxury items.

Our property tax has gone up about 15% this year, and we already live in a location that has relatively low taxes.

Public transit is "only" 2% more expensive than last year, and got 2% more expensive in 2020 as well. That seems pretty low. Until you start to notice that most buses and trains run 2 times per hour now instead of 4, due to lower amounts of passengers due to Covid / WFH. And they start running later in the day. I think the earliest bus in my neighbourhood is now 6.30am instead of 5.30am. And right before the pandemic, VAT on public transit was raised (from 6 to 9%) which resulted in an average 5% increase in price. All in all we're getting half of the amount of buses and trains for a 10% higher price than pre-Covid.

Another staple that has doubled in price since the pandemic are 1 pound bags of oats, that used to cost me Ä0,30 but are now Ä0,69.

Still, we're doing more than OK. We've both got a few raises that more than compensate the higher prices.

Your comment about the reduced public transport schedule is kind of like the shrinkflation we've seen in goods... it's the first example of it happening in the service sector that I have seen.

BlueMR2

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #91 on: February 27, 2022, 09:02:58 AM »
By spending more money!

Same here. The biggest dollar increases in costs for us have been property taxes (because the value of the house has gone up) and health insurance (even after ACA subsidies).  The only solution would be to move... but moving would generate expenses greater than the increases in taxes and health insurance.

Damned if you do, damned if you don't...

Property taxes took a big jump for us between the value of the property going up and another round of taxes being voted in.  The school taxes are killing us.  People automatically vote for whatever ridiculous increase they want just because "it's for the kids".  Over 2/3 of our tax is now JUST for the schools.  The entire rest of the local government runs on the remaining 1/3.  I wouldn't be upset as much if throwing more money at schools made smarter kids, but that relationship doesn't appear to exist once one is past a certain threshold...

Dicey

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #92 on: February 27, 2022, 09:09:46 AM »
By spending more money!

Same here. The biggest dollar increases in costs for us have been property taxes (because the value of the house has gone up) and health insurance (even after ACA subsidies).  The only solution would be to move... but moving would generate expenses greater than the increases in taxes and health insurance.

Damned if you do, damned if you don't...

Property taxes took a big jump for us between the value of the property going up and another round of taxes being voted in.  The school taxes are killing us.  People automatically vote for whatever ridiculous increase they want just because "it's for the kids".  Over 2/3 of our tax is now JUST for the schools.  The entire rest of the local government runs on the remaining 1/3.  I wouldn't be upset as much if throwing more money at schools made smarter kids, but that relationship doesn't appear to exist once one is past a certain threshold...
I appreciate that they can't really do that in CA. Something people don't think about when they decide to flee...

GreenSheep

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #93 on: February 27, 2022, 10:25:51 AM »
Your comment about the reduced public transport schedule is kind of like the shrinkflation we've seen in goods... it's the first example of it happening in the service sector that I have seen.

I guess you haven't been to a hotel lately.

https://thepointsguy.com/news/missing-hotel-amenities/?utm_source=TPG%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=3784969&utm_usr=82d9cdb74aebb92726074379679f5b8d8d41690e2743188eb9b2c0fcf341afb0&utm_msg=28bb7cb9eb5e4bb98356b55fb1739bb0&utm_date=2022-02-27

stoaX

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #94 on: February 27, 2022, 12:14:20 PM »
Your comment about the reduced public transport schedule is kind of like the shrinkflation we've seen in goods... it's the first example of it happening in the service sector that I have seen.

I guess you haven't been to a hotel lately.

https://thepointsguy.com/news/missing-hotel-amenities/?utm_source=TPG%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=3784969&utm_usr=82d9cdb74aebb92726074379679f5b8d8d41690e2743188eb9b2c0fcf341afb0&utm_msg=28bb7cb9eb5e4bb98356b55fb1739bb0&utm_date=2022-02-27

Thanks for the link.  Out of all the things that went away "because of covid", I would miss the do not disturb sign the most.

GreenSheep

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #95 on: February 27, 2022, 12:44:44 PM »
Your comment about the reduced public transport schedule is kind of like the shrinkflation we've seen in goods... it's the first example of it happening in the service sector that I have seen.

I guess you haven't been to a hotel lately.

https://thepointsguy.com/news/missing-hotel-amenities/?utm_source=TPG%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=3784969&utm_usr=82d9cdb74aebb92726074379679f5b8d8d41690e2743188eb9b2c0fcf341afb0&utm_msg=28bb7cb9eb5e4bb98356b55fb1739bb0&utm_date=2022-02-27

Thanks for the link.  Out of all the things that went away "because of covid", I would miss the do not disturb sign the most.

YES!! That was my first thought, too! It's not that I sleep in; it's that I don't need someone coming into my room to tidy up while I'm out for the day if my stay is only a few days long. I'll take the privacy/security over the tiny added luxury of having someone else make my bed.

ixtap

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #96 on: February 27, 2022, 01:23:52 PM »
Your comment about the reduced public transport schedule is kind of like the shrinkflation we've seen in goods... it's the first example of it happening in the service sector that I have seen.

I guess you haven't been to a hotel lately.

https://thepointsguy.com/news/missing-hotel-amenities/?utm_source=TPG%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=3784969&utm_usr=82d9cdb74aebb92726074379679f5b8d8d41690e2743188eb9b2c0fcf341afb0&utm_msg=28bb7cb9eb5e4bb98356b55fb1739bb0&utm_date=2022-02-27

Thanks for the link.  Out of all the things that went away "because of covid", I would miss the do not disturb sign the most.

Happy to report that every hotel I have stayed at in the last 9 months had the do not disturb sign available.

JAYSLOL

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #97 on: February 27, 2022, 02:31:21 PM »
A few things Iíve been doing that help a lot lately

-my own car maintenance, Iíve always done my own oil changes, swapping tires and minor work like brake pads and spark plugs, but last year I decided to tackle some harder jobs that in the past ive had a shop do, including timing belt and water pump replacement and brake caliper/bleeding brake system.  Probably saved $2-3k last year doing work myself as we had a bunch of things all at once on two cars.  On a side note, it helps that I drive two ~$4k Hyundaiís and keep them on the road myself rather than have a couple big monthly car payments. 

- we buy a side of pork and do the butchering ourselves, itís like 1/3 the price of buying in the store and it only takes a few hours. 

- I hardly ever buy new stuff, most of what I need I find at garage sales or auctions or if it is new I donít often pay retail and get it from a liquidation place or Facebook marketplace


Our food cost and heating bill have gone up, but weíve just absorbed the extra cost for the most part.  Iím hoping by next year I can negotiate a significant raise, but in the mean time Iím going to try to ramp up the side hustles

pasadenafr

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #98 on: February 27, 2022, 03:30:06 PM »
Your comment about the reduced public transport schedule is kind of like the shrinkflation we've seen in goods... it's the first example of it happening in the service sector that I have seen.

I guess you haven't been to a hotel lately.

https://thepointsguy.com/news/missing-hotel-amenities/?utm_source=TPG%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=3784969&utm_usr=82d9cdb74aebb92726074379679f5b8d8d41690e2743188eb9b2c0fcf341afb0&utm_msg=28bb7cb9eb5e4bb98356b55fb1739bb0&utm_date=2022-02-27

Thanks for the link.  Out of all the things that went away "because of covid", I would miss the do not disturb sign the most.

Happy to report that every hotel I have stayed at in the last 9 months had the do not disturb sign available.

Yeah me too. However every hotel I have stayed at in the last year had no more housekeeping unless you ask for it a day in advance, barely any food service (breakfast, lunch and/or dinner) and increased prices for everything.

Not that I travel much outside of work these days, but AirBnB it is. For work, well, I don't really have a choice, unfortunately, but I'll check these things before I choose a room to book, even if it's not my usual Marriot (haven't gotten a room upgrade in a year either, although I'm a Gold member).

GreenSheep

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Re: How are you adapting to inflation?
« Reply #99 on: February 27, 2022, 04:58:22 PM »
So they have Do Not Disturb signs for the housekeeping that... doesn't exist. Genius.