Author Topic: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?  (Read 7667 times)

Meowkins

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Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« on: May 23, 2017, 06:44:13 AM »
Hi all,

So, this is going to be a real swell year for ticks and a real shit year for the rest of us that don't like disease-infested vermin stealing our hard-won blood. Do you have any good advice for novice hikers on how to avoid ticks on the trail and treat clothes post-trail?

Yes, I do have Google and have searched about this; but this is a place of unusually resourceful and inspired folk, so I would also like to crowd source it.

Also, I just like talking to people, so there.

somers515

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2017, 06:54:11 AM »
When I first started hiking I would occasionally find a couple of ticks on me after a long hike.  Now I use Sawyer Permethrin spray on my hiking clothes and I haven't found a tick yet (knock on wood).  I hang the clothes in my basement, spray them, next day they are dry and ready for use.  The spray molecules adhere to the clothing and will last through several washes before you have to re-apply.  Good luck!

YttriumNitrate

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2017, 07:17:26 AM »
When I first started hiking I would occasionally find a couple of ticks on me after a long hike.  Now I use Sawyer Permethrin spray on my hiking clothes and I haven't found a tick yet (knock on wood).  I hang the clothes in my basement, spray them, next day they are dry and ready for use.  The spray molecules adhere to the clothing and will last through several washes beforef you have to re-apply.  Good luck!
Permethrin is wonderful stuff for keeping ticks at bay, however with a user name of Meowkins and an avatar picture of cats it is probably a no-go. Deet isn't as effective as permethrin, but it is more cat friendly.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2017, 07:25:31 AM »
Hmm, thanks! I'll do some more research on it. As Nitrate points out, I do have two cats and live in a 1BR, so not much room to let clothes dry away from contact with animals and people. But it's good info to have.

slappy

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2017, 07:52:37 AM »
Following. All the local moms groups are going crazy about ticks right now. Short of staying indoors, I'm not sure how much can be done. I've seen some things about essential oil combinations that repel ticks, but I can't seem to find anything that is unanimously recommended as actually working. I did read that one good practice is to tuck your pants into your socks so they can't go up your pants. This weekend I was wearing a pair of leggings under my jeans and when I took off my jeans, there was a tick on the leggings. So I guess they will crawl up under the pants.

trollwithamustache

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2017, 08:11:54 AM »
I'm that guy out there hiking in pants no matter how hot it is.

A second vote for Permethrin.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2017, 08:16:07 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

Fishindude

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2017, 08:21:55 AM »
You are just as likely to get a tick on you cutting the grass and brushing up against a tree as you are out hiking.  Just be aware and look for them.  I generally find them on myself before they get a chance to dig in.  Check little kids and pets carefully.

R62

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2017, 08:24:40 AM »
I'm that guy out there hiking in pants no matter how hot it is.


This, and a pair of tweezers, just in case.

Dicey

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2017, 08:41:02 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."
I've also heard them referred to as, "Singles Bars for ticks".

slappy

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2017, 09:03:19 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

Yeah but the alternative is not letting them outside, and to me that's not an option. One of my coworkers actually said he is making his 11 year old stay inside and letting him play more video games as a consolation prize for not being outside and climbing trees. (I guess the kid likes to climb trees.)  Ticks are a part of life, unfortunately.

YttriumNitrate

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2017, 11:01:50 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

I live in an area overrun with deer, and one of the highest rates of Lyme disease in the state. I tried tick tubes (permethrin drenched cotton balls in tubes), but that is seems to have more of a long term plan. Recently, I decided to implement the nuclear option and sprayed the whole yard with permethrin, so the cat is now banished from the outdoors. If spraying doesn't work, I might unleash a flock of Guinea Fowl on the subdivision...

slappy

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2017, 11:08:55 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

I live in an area overrun with deer, and one of the highest rates of Lyme disease in the state. I tried tick tubes (permethrin drenched cotton balls in tubes), but that is seems to have more of a long term plan. Recently, I decided to implement the nuclear option and sprayed the whole yard with permethrin, so the cat is now banished from the outdoors. If spraying doesn't work, I might unleash a flock of Guinea Fowl on the subdivision...

I actually just bought some praying mantis egg sacks to hatch for our yard. Supposedly they eat all kinds of bugs and ticks.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004LTFMAY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

My coworker complained that it was trading one bug for another, but as far as i know, the praying mantis is harmless to humans, while ticks are not. The eggs have not hatched yet, so I can't speak to effectiveness, but if all else fails, it will be a fun activity for my toddler.

MsPeacock

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2017, 11:27:37 AM »
In terms of repellant the "Repell" brand was rated highly (I think in consumer reports and is deet free).

Treating clothes is always a good idea if you can manage it

Deet also works, of course.

I used to treat my dog with Frontline, which was completely ineffective against ticks. Two years ago she had tick paralysis which was scary and expensive (emergency vet, neurology vet, etc). We have switched to Bravecto for the dog and she hasn't had a tick on her since. I live in a wooded neighborhood and deer are in my yard daily, so this is quite effective treatment. I stopped using frontline on the cats and they don't have ticks either. I think the Bravecto has some carry over effects to the household.

Two of three cats are excellent mousers and have elimated mice and rats in the yard. Mice are the main carriers of the ticks, so I think this also helps.

Lastly I removed all the barberry bushes in my yard. Allegedly they harbor ticks (and are an invasive non-native plant).

Lastly always check yourself and pets for ticks and remove them immediately.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2017, 11:37:22 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

Yeah but the alternative is not letting them outside, and to me that's not an option. One of my coworkers actually said he is making his 11 year old stay inside and letting him play more video games as a consolation prize for not being outside and climbing trees. (I guess the kid likes to climb trees.)  Ticks are a part of life, unfortunately.

Oh, you misunderstand. I really like challenges! And of course kiddos should be out playing in the sunshine :) I was asking any tick pros to brainstorm that element too.

I will think on it as well.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2017, 11:38:19 AM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

I live in an area overrun with deer, and one of the highest rates of Lyme disease in the state. I tried tick tubes (permethrin drenched cotton balls in tubes), but that is seems to have more of a long term plan. Recently, I decided to implement the nuclear option and sprayed the whole yard with permethrin, so the cat is now banished from the outdoors. If spraying doesn't work, I might unleash a flock of Guinea Fowl on the subdivision...

I actually just bought some praying mantis egg sacks to hatch for our yard. Supposedly they eat all kinds of bugs and ticks.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004LTFMAY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

My coworker complained that it was trading one bug for another, but as far as i know, the praying mantis is harmless to humans, while ticks are not. The eggs have not hatched yet, so I can't speak to effectiveness, but if all else fails, it will be a fun activity for my toddler.

Also praying mantis are pretty darn cool.

seattlecyclone

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2017, 11:40:19 AM »
Wear long pants, tuck them into your socks if you must, and avoid walking through tall grass. I personally can't stand the smell of DEET so I rarely use it. No lyme disease yet!

SingleMomDebt

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2017, 11:42:26 AM »
I want my own praying mantis. That's cool.

Ticks are not a big problem where I am at.. But I saw this the other day: Peppermint oil will get out ticks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HbNtwluBYCY




trollwithamustache

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2017, 12:09:11 PM »
Trying to reframe it in the context of kids playing outside is an added challenge!

It also reminds me now why Louis CK referred to deer as, "Rats with hooves."

I live in an area overrun with deer, and one of the highest rates of Lyme disease in the state. I tried tick tubes (permethrin drenched cotton balls in tubes), but that is seems to have more of a long term plan. Recently, I decided to implement the nuclear option and sprayed the whole yard with permethrin, so the cat is now banished from the outdoors. If spraying doesn't work, I might unleash a flock of Guinea Fowl on the subdivision...

Please go Guinea Fowl and give us a full report.
       
-from a Chicken man looking to take the next step.

neophyte

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2017, 12:17:57 PM »
I recommend a good handheld mirror. 

GoingToMaine

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2017, 02:06:53 PM »
I sent a bunch of my hiking clothes away to Insect Shield to get them treated.  For like $65, they send you a bag that fits at least 8 garments (I fit a LOT more).  You mail them the bag (they pay the postage), and about a week later you get your treated clothes back.  It's the same thing as treating your clothes with permethrin, but treating them yourself lasts 5-7 washings.  Having them do it lasts 70 washings, so basically as long as you'll ever have those clothes.  Plus, you don't have to worry about poisoning your cats.  And like regular permethrin treatments, there is no smell or anything.

Since I did that, I've gone on a handful of hikes in some pretty grassy areas and haven't had a single tick on me.  I haven't gotten any mosquito bites either, and watched a swarm of gnats part around me.  The black flies in Maine seemed unfazed by it, though.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2017, 02:13:33 PM »
I sent a bunch of my hiking clothes away to Insect Shield to get them treated.  For like $65, they send you a bag that fits at least 8 garments (I fit a LOT more).  You mail them the bag (they pay the postage), and about a week later you get your treated clothes back.  It's the same thing as treating your clothes with permethrin, but treating them yourself lasts 5-7 washings.  Having them do it lasts 70 washings, so basically as long as you'll ever have those clothes.  Plus, you don't have to worry about poisoning your cats.  And like regular permethrin treatments, there is no smell or anything.

Since I did that, I've gone on a handful of hikes in some pretty grassy areas and haven't had a single tick on me.  I haven't gotten any mosquito bites either, and watched a swarm of gnats part around me.  The black flies in Maine seemed unfazed by it, though.

:O....


You are a genius.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2017, 02:14:27 PM »
Slappy, maybe tell you rkids to choose a bunch of "outside" clothes and get them treated?

I do not have children and have no idea how feasible that is.

GoingToMaine

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2017, 02:24:23 PM »
I sent a bunch of my hiking clothes away to Insect Shield to get them treated.  For like $65, they send you a bag that fits at least 8 garments (I fit a LOT more).  You mail them the bag (they pay the postage), and about a week later you get your treated clothes back.  It's the same thing as treating your clothes with permethrin, but treating them yourself lasts 5-7 washings.  Having them do it lasts 70 washings, so basically as long as you'll ever have those clothes.  Plus, you don't have to worry about poisoning your cats.  And like regular permethrin treatments, there is no smell or anything.

Since I did that, I've gone on a handful of hikes in some pretty grassy areas and haven't had a single tick on me.  I haven't gotten any mosquito bites either, and watched a swarm of gnats part around me.  The black flies in Maine seemed unfazed by it, though.

:O....


You are a genius.

I wouldn't go that far, but I'm definitely pleased with the decision so far.

GoingToMaine

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2017, 02:24:54 PM »
Ugh - what does stop the black flies?  I hate them!
Nothing.  They are evil incarnate.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #25 on: May 23, 2017, 02:28:22 PM »
Welp, now I know what black flies are and where they are a problem in my county. The more you know!

slappy

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2017, 03:10:41 PM »
Slappy, maybe tell you rkids to choose a bunch of "outside" clothes and get them treated?

I do not have children and have no idea how feasible that is.

They are still toddlers, so I probably won't do that. I don't have any issue with them playing outside and just inspecting them thoroughly. I'm not sure why the local moms groups are freaking out. Do they not realize that bugs exist? I know Lyme is a big concern but ticks are not exactly a new thing.

MrsWolfeRN

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2017, 03:30:15 PM »
Meh, just pull them off when you notice them. The tick has to be on for quite some time to transmit Lyme disease. Just make sure to check your kids after they play outside.

MsPeacock

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #28 on: May 23, 2017, 03:38:45 PM »
The reason for the freak out is that the incidence of Lyme has increased dramatically.

http://www.westernjournalism.com/researcher-predicts-increase-in-lyme-disease-in-2017/

Plus ticks carry a host of other nasty diseases, many of them worse than Lyme.


Yuck!

LWTG

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #29 on: May 23, 2017, 06:27:29 PM »
Meh, just pull them off when you notice them. The tick has to be on for quite some time to transmit Lyme disease. Just make sure to check your kids after they play outside.

That's what I do; just pull them off. But he "quite some time" is'nt as long as some people think ~36 hours they say

We try to check the kids every day, but sometimes forget... or you miss one or they are on the couch from the dog or falling off your clothes and then climb on you or or etc...each of my kids has already had one that was biting them this year (not just crawling). I've had 3 so far and my wife has had 1.

Between construction work, my yard maintenance/playing, and hiking/mtn biking I pull a good 20+ a year off me. I have been precautiously treated twice (when the bites developed the tell tale bulls-eye pattern) for Lymes though never actually had it show up in my blood stream (thank goodness)

I've never heard of this clothes treating, may look into it. Though it seems they usually either climb up from the bottom or just fall on you from the trees. Way too hot (for me) to not wear shorts and short sleeves so lots of skin exposure too. I've tried dousing my legs/feet/shorts with Deet before Mtn biking but it's a pain and kind of sticky/smelly. Nay try again though as this year they do seem worse already and it's only Spring!

They are pretty damn annoying

MayDay

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #30 on: May 23, 2017, 06:40:21 PM »
80% of ticks land on your head, 20% from your feet according to one study I read. We spray hats and shoes with permethrin. We still get them all over. Chickens keep them under control in our yard but that doesn't help for hiking.

We get them on us sometimes. Eh. Not a big deal. Pull it off.

My son did get Lyme last summer but we caught it at the bullseye rash stage and he had a month of antibiotics and never had a positive Lyme blood test result.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #31 on: May 23, 2017, 06:51:18 PM »
80% on your head?!?! HOW?

MrsWolfeRN

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #32 on: May 23, 2017, 07:34:30 PM »
80% on your head?!?! HOW?

They jump out of trees and land on you.
 
My hospital system does not do pre-emptive treatment. I called their triage line once because hubby had a bulls eye rash and they said he was fine as long as he didn't have a fever.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #33 on: May 23, 2017, 07:36:39 PM »
Quote from: MrsWolfeRN link=topic=73984.msg1563463#msg1563463

They jump out of trees and land on you.

[/quote

Sweet baby jesus

Mr. Green

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #34 on: May 23, 2017, 09:32:10 PM »
Permethrin is the only way to go. Developed by the military, when an insert lands on a fabric impregnated with permethrin it overloads the nervous system and kills the insect instantly. When clothes are soaked in it and then dried, the permethrin chemically binds to the fibers. In that state they are locked in and harmless. You could lick your shirt and be fine. It is the agitation during washing that begins to break up the permethrin when the friction starts breaking the bonds. If you have a newer washing machine without an agitator the permethrin will likely stay around more than a couple washes. Also, you can buy it concentrated (13%) at farm supply stores instead of in a retail store at 0.5% and dilute it yourself. Waaaaay cheaper. Farmers will spray the stuff directly on livestock and let it dry to keep insects away from the animals.

elaine amj

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #35 on: May 23, 2017, 09:56:38 PM »
Hmmm...will check out permethrin. Lyme disease is a big scare in our area this year and DH is super worried. Last year, I brought home 3 ticks after my first two spring hikes! He asked, and I agreed (a bit reluctantly) to avoid hiking in the woods for the rest of the year. I missed it a lot though.

This year, after our first camping trip last weekend, my son found a tick crawling up his leg on the drive home. Ugh.

I think I will check out this permethrin - maybe if I had specific "hiking clothes" I use for my wooded hikes, that would help.

Can you spray it on running shoes?


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Axecleaver

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2017, 05:41:00 AM »
We're in upstate NY, which is ground zero for ticks. I don't remember them being a problem when I was a kid, and I spent every minute of daylight rolling around in the grass and walking through the woods. But now, they're horrible. Just mowing the lawn I get ticks on me. End of days.

One tip I haven't seen yet is to shower - put all your clothes right in the wash after you come in and take a shower. This will get the majority off. Then do a full body inspection, with a buddy if possible. They love to get into ears and right on the hairline, where they're tough to see.

Quote
80% of ticks land on your head, 20% from your feet according to one study I read
Ticks do not climb trees or jump on your head. They climb to the top of vegetation (grass blades mostly) but don't ever get higher than the knees, until they find a victim. Smooth knee-high boots will do wonders for reducing your tick exposure. Then they climb as high as they can on the victim. Perhaps the study said they found 80% around the head, but they didn't start there.

Like termites, they need to stay in relatively high-humidity areas or they die. They couldn't spend more than 20 minutes in a tree because the wind would dry them out and kill them.

http://www.walterreeves.com/gardening-q-and-a/maple-tree-tick-prevention/
http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/myth-buster-ticks-falling-trees
https://www.hunker.com/12592360/cedar-trees-and-ticks

Quote
Ugh - what does stop the black flies?  I hate them!
Smoke cigars. I went camping in the De Laurentides one summer with friends, and that was the only thing that worked for us. As soon as it goes out though, they're back on you.

MayDay

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #37 on: May 24, 2017, 06:04:04 AM »
80% on your head?!?! HOW?

Yup. If there is anything overhead they either fall onto you or you brush your head against branches as you walk.

They jump out of trees and land on you.
 
My hospital system does not do pre-emptive treatment. I called their triage line once because hubby had a bulls eye rash and they said he was fine as long as he didn't have a fever.

MayDay

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #38 on: May 24, 2017, 06:06:29 AM »
Hmmm...will check out permethrin. Lyme disease is a big scare in our area this year and DH is super worried. Last year, I brought home 3 ticks after my first two spring hikes! He asked, and I agreed (a bit reluctantly) to avoid hiking in the woods for the rest of the year. I missed it a lot though.

This year, after our first camping trip last weekend, my son found a tick crawling up his leg on the drive home. Ugh.

I think I will check out this permethrin - maybe if I had specific "hiking clothes" I use for my wooded hikes, that would help.

Can you spray it on running shoes?


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You can spray it on running shoes.  On a sunny day if you spray clothes and lay them in the sun, it'll only take 10-20 minutes to dry, so you don't have to plan too far ahead.

MayDay

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2017, 06:08:08 AM »
Axecleaver, Google agrees with you. So weird. I would have sworn I read from a reputable source the head thing.

elaine amj

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2017, 09:17:35 AM »
OK - next question - where to buy permethrin?

Spork

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #41 on: May 24, 2017, 09:29:39 AM »
Not related to hiking, but still related to ticks:  Oddly the gawd awful fire ant is an awesome tick hunter.  While I hate the little bastards, we pretty much don't have ticks once it starts getting hot around here.  Our tick peak is winter when the fire ants are hiding away.

MrsDinero

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #42 on: May 24, 2017, 09:29:59 AM »
i use YaYa Organics Tick ban spray.  I think it works pretty well and I haven't had a tick yet.  I spray it on my kids and cat.  It is best used if sprayed on your skin and not clothes.  My husband who does not use it has had several already.  Bonus no DEET.

https://www.yayaorganics.com/

Also you should just get in the habit of checking often. 

Axecleaver

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #43 on: May 24, 2017, 10:03:00 AM »
Buy the concentrated permethrin at your local livestock place - around here it's Agway and Tractor Supply. You can dilute that 40:1 in a spray bottle.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #44 on: May 24, 2017, 10:11:32 AM »
Permethrin seems pretty safe even for those that hate that sort of thing. However, apply it carefully because our poor bees are already suffering! The recommendations I'm seeing are not to spray it near bodies of water and to do it during hours where bees are supposed to have less activity. TBH, I'm leaning towards just getting the insect shield stuff and hope that their treatment is bee-conscious...


Mr. Green

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #45 on: May 24, 2017, 10:50:39 AM »
Buy the concentrated permethrin at your local livestock place - around here it's Agway and Tractor Supply. You can dilute that 40:1 in a spray bottle.
+1.

I bought a pre-diluted bottle when I was in a last minute pinch at REI but concentrated is totally the way to go. However you can buy different percentages of concentrate. You want it diluted to 0.5% roughly.

GoingToMaine

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #46 on: May 24, 2017, 01:31:09 PM »
Meh, just pull them off when you notice them. The tick has to be on for quite some time to transmit Lyme disease. Just make sure to check your kids after they play outside.

That's what I do; just pull them off. But he "quite some time" is'nt as long as some people think ~36 hours they say


That is outdated advice, unfortunately.  It is true for Lyme disease, but there has been a surge over the past couple of years in a second disease, a virus called Powassan.  So far it's mostly in the northeast, but like Lyme it is expanding.  Transmission time is as low as 15 minutes, and so far around 10% of the cases have been fatal.  50% who survive it end up with impairments.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #47 on: May 24, 2017, 01:52:29 PM »
Meh, just pull them off when you notice them. The tick has to be on for quite some time to transmit Lyme disease. Just make sure to check your kids after they play outside.

That's what I do; just pull them off. But he "quite some time" is'nt as long as some people think ~36 hours they say


That is outdated advice, unfortunately.  It is true for Lyme disease, but there has been a surge over the past couple of years in a second disease, a virus called Powassan.  So far it's mostly in the northeast, but like Lyme it is expanding.  Transmission time is as low as 15 minutes, and so far around 10% of the cases have been fatal.  50% who survive it end up with impairments.

Totally almost shat my pants and vowed to never leave my house again, so caveating that the CDC reports, "Approximately 75 cases of POW virus disease were reported in the United States over the past 10 years." On the rise, but not yet at epidemic or likely proportions.

But shit, y'all. Nature so scary.

AZDude

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #48 on: May 24, 2017, 02:20:29 PM »
http://legacy.wbur.org/2012/06/27/lyme-vaccine

Of course, remember, this could all be prevented if not for anti-vaccine nutters and other fucking stupid people. An effective Lyme's disease vaccine exists, is 80% effective, and is available for dogs. You cannot get it though because the company that made it decided it was not worth the hassle of putting up with public stupidity.

So if you believe vaccines are safe... I am sorry. If you think they cause autism, then enjoy your Lyme disease.

Meowkins

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Re: Hikers: What to do about the dreaded Tick?
« Reply #49 on: May 24, 2017, 02:37:32 PM »
http://legacy.wbur.org/2012/06/27/lyme-vaccine

Of course, remember, this could all be prevented if not for anti-vaccine nutters and other fucking stupid people. An effective Lyme's disease vaccine exists, is 80% effective, and is available for dogs. You cannot get it though because the company that made it decided it was not worth the hassle of putting up with public stupidity.

So if you believe vaccines are safe... I am sorry. If you think they cause autism, then enjoy your Lyme disease.

I thought the vaccine was pulled due to joint problems it caused in patients? Can we get Powassan vaccine, like yesterday?