Author Topic: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)  (Read 2392 times)

nereo

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help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« on: July 08, 2015, 08:26:43 AM »
Alright, someone here please help me out.
I have a road bike with 700 x 23c tires and older (circa 2004) shimano 105 components with a 9 speed rear cassette.

The rear rim was bent beyond repair during a moving accident (it was a Mavic XP21 if that matters), and I'm trying to pick up a rear rim that's not too much money so I can start riding my road bike again.  My front rim/tire is fine.  I found a guy who's selling a Mavic Ksyrium Elite (rear rim) for $50, which seems like a great deal.

Questions:
1) any reason why this rim won't work?
2) any problems using this rim on the rear of my bike while keeping my less expensive Mavic XP21 on the front? (or in other words, can you use two different types of rims as long as the tire size is the same?)

TrMama

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2015, 09:40:25 AM »
It should fit fine. My concerns with the superlight wheel are:

1. If you are a heavier person, or carry heavy panniers on the back, the low spoke count, and light spokes, can make it hard to keep the wheel true. This is a bigger concern for rear wheels, because the rear wheel carries more weight than the front.

2. The rims on a really lightweight wheel are very thin. They will wear more quickly than a heavier built rim. If you want to race and are concerned about getting your bike as light as possible, light is fine. If you commute (especially in wet weather) the rim will wear out quickly. Once it's grooved, it will also wear your brake pads unevenly and you'll have to replace them more often.

Feel the rim to see if it's grooved, or "scooped". If it is, pass on the wheel.

humbleMouse

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2015, 09:49:30 AM »
A kyrisum is great.  When you go look at the rim to buy it, spin it in your hands and listen for any grit or grinding in the hub.  Also try to notice if it has any dents or is badly out of true.  Don't buy it if there are major dents on the braking surface, or if it is too badly out of true, or if there is a gritty noise/feel as it spins.  It will work on your bike though and is a nice wheel.

Quote
2. The rims on a really lightweight wheel are very thin. They will wear more quickly than a heavier built rim. If you want to race and are concerned about getting your bike as light as possible, light is fine. If you commute (especially in wet weather) the rim will wear out quickly. Once it's grooved, it will also wear your brake pads unevenly and you'll have to replace them more often.

The kyrisum is a very strong wheel.  It has bladed spokes and holds up well.  I wouldn't worry about it wearing out too quickly. 
« Last Edit: July 08, 2015, 09:54:34 AM by humbleMouse »

klystomane

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2015, 10:03:00 AM »
A kyrisum is great.  When you go look at the rim to buy it, spin it in your hands and listen for any grit or grinding in the hub.  Also try to notice if it has any dents or is badly out of true.  Don't buy it if there are major dents on the braking surface, or if it is too badly out of true, or if there is a gritty noise/feel as it spins.  It will work on your bike though and is a nice wheel.

Quote
2. The rims on a really lightweight wheel are very thin. They will wear more quickly than a heavier built rim. If you want to race and are concerned about getting your bike as light as possible, light is fine. If you commute (especially in wet weather) the rim will wear out quickly. Once it's grooved, it will also wear your brake pads unevenly and you'll have to replace them more often.

The kyrisum is a very strong wheel.  It has bladed spokes and holds up well.  I wouldn't worry about it wearing out too quickly.

+1

I commute on a bike with Ksyrium wheels which seem kinda meaty for a road bike IMO. I have a rear rack and a DIY laptop "pannier" that I load up to go to work. I would say the rack + bag/contents is about 10-15lbs. I weigh about 150lbs, so a total of 160lbs give or take.

I haven't had any issues with it yet, but I do weigh a bit on the light side.

nereo

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2015, 10:33:33 AM »
thanks all.  I'm going to check out the wheel tomorrow, and will look for grit/grinding as well as whether it's dented or 'grooved'.  The guy says it's in great shape.

This isn't my daily commuter bike, but something I take out on weekend just to ride long distances.  I'm 6'5" and 200 so my size alone puts a lot of weight on the rear wheel - c'est la vie.

To sum up then; there's no mechanical reason why i can't use two different wheels on my bike at the same time, as long as they are the same size (and the rear wheel is designated to be a rear wheel), right?

abiteveryday

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2015, 10:40:02 AM »
You will have no difficulty with mismatched wheels.    If the new one doesn't come with a cassette, make sure you are prepared to move the old one moved to the new wheel.    It is a very simple job, but not one you can do without the proper tools.

TrMama

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2015, 10:40:13 AM »

To sum up then; there's no mechanical reason why i can't use two different wheels on my bike at the same time, as long as they are the same size (and the rear wheel is designated to be a rear wheel), right?

Correct. A bike is not a car. The wheels don't need to match.

Faraday

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Re: help - replacing rear wheel (bike repair/maintenance)
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2015, 10:44:54 AM »
thanks all.  I'm going to check out the wheel tomorrow, and will look for grit/grinding as well as whether it's dented or 'grooved'.  The guy says it's in great shape.

This isn't my daily commuter bike, but something I take out on weekend just to ride long distances.  I'm 6'5" and 200 so my size alone puts a lot of weight on the rear wheel - c'est la vie.

To sum up then; there's no mechanical reason why i can't use two different wheels on my bike at the same time, as long as they are the same size (and the rear wheel is designated to be a rear wheel), right?

Should be no issues. Things you should be looking for:

1) You didn't say if you are transferring a tire or not - you'll want to make sure it fits.
2) Were you able to save the rim strip from the old rim and/or are you getting a rim strip on the next rim?
3) There may be differences in the width that require you to monkey with the brake settings - loosening the pads and moving them in the brake or changing the opening width of the brakes.
4) Look for a quick release on the brakes so you can open them up to remove/replace the wheel.