Author Topic: Graduation Gifts  (Read 3828 times)

cheeselover91

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Graduation Gifts
« on: May 19, 2014, 11:59:31 AM »
Does anyone have a good recommendation for graduation gifts? I've got two non-typical parties this year that I kinda need help with-

A) High school graduate that is not going to college
B) College graduate

I could do money, but the college grad already has a good paying job and doesn't need my $$. Money is kind of a lame gift anyway- there's got to be something better than that out there.

Any suggestions? I was thinking maybe a book of some sort. A gift that will keep on giving would be preferable.

MayDay

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2014, 12:24:51 PM »
The high schooler wants money.  The end. 

The college person, I have no idea.  I kind of doubt they want a "thing" unless you are talking about spending a decent amount of money.  If they are moving into their first apartment or house, then you could do a household item like a nice kitchen appliance.  If your budget is small, you could do a nice potted plant for their front stoop, or a seasonal wreath for their front door, etc. 

RetireAbroadAt35

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2014, 01:59:32 PM »
Give a check (so the grad has to take it to the bank), as well as a copy of a spreadsheet based on the Shockingly Simple Math with a projection towards FI.  Encourage them to save it.

studentdoc2

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2014, 05:02:04 PM »
My younger sister just graduated from college. I gave her Lean In and a book on finances in your 20s and 30s (discusses things like what is an IRA, how does compounding interest work, 401(k), stocks vs. bonds, funds, etc....). She's been living on handouts from Mom & Dad, so I'm hoping this helps as she starts having to control her own budget and money for the first time.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2014, 06:28:43 PM by studentdoc2 »

galliver

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2014, 05:21:22 PM »
You always want to start looking for gift ideas by looking at a person's place in life, goals, interests, etc.

For the college grad, could they use something for their nice job? Wardrobe update (pretty much no one graduates college with a proper professional wardrobe), nice/quality bag, headset, new headphones for public transit commute, etc. Just because they don't desperately need it right this second doesn't mean it wouldn't be nice, appreciated, and maybe eventually needed anyway. Same goes for apartment; maybe they "have everything" but that includes mismatched plastic dishes and a $5 mixer because it was cheapest. Maybe as an adult they'd be interested in upgrading these things gradually, and you can expedite the process if you contribute.

For the HS grad, I feel like we'd need more information to give good suggestions. Do they have a job lined up? Another kind of training? What are their long-term plans if not college? What are their hobbies (many hobbies have consumable supplies that are always in demand)?  Of course money would help with any of the above, but I find there's a kind of social ritual and communication in giving actual gifts and I rather like that. Even if it's a gift card rather than money, as long as there's thought/reason behind the card.

MillenialMustache

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2014, 07:00:23 AM »
When I graduated high school, I got mostly money, which was appreciated. My favorite gift though was a very nice set of bookends (probably $40-$50). I still have them on display almost 10 years later, but it was already well known to my family I loved to read. Maybe try to buy something particularly nice related to a hobby? No college graduation gifts stand out to me, and I know I mostly got money. Good luck!

Ottawa

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2014, 07:04:34 AM »
Does anyone have a good recommendation for graduation gifts? I've got two non-typical parties this year that I kinda need help with-

A) High school graduate that is not going to college
B) College graduate

I could do money, but the college grad already has a good paying job and doesn't need my $$. Money is kind of a lame gift anyway- there's got to be something better than that out there.

Any suggestions? I was thinking maybe a book of some sort. A gift that will keep on giving would be preferable.

I've not heard of this before.  A party among peers..yes, but hosted by friends/family...no.   

I mean, I have no problem if someone wishes to celebrate a milestone such as this...but gifts?  Absolutely not.

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2014, 07:14:34 AM »
Does anyone have a good recommendation for graduation gifts? I've got two non-typical parties this year that I kinda need help with-

A) High school graduate that is not going to college
B) College graduate

I could do money, but the college grad already has a good paying job and doesn't need my $$. Money is kind of a lame gift anyway- there's got to be something better than that out there.

Any suggestions? I was thinking maybe a book of some sort. A gift that will keep on giving would be preferable.

I've not heard of this before.  A party among peers..yes, but hosted by friends/family...no.   

I mean, I have no problem if someone wishes to celebrate a milestone such as this...but gifts?  Absolutely not.

Wait, really?

Maybe it's a US thing. At least in the part of the country I'm from, basically everyone has a high school graduation party, usually open-house style at your parents' house, usually attended by a mixture of relatives and peers/friends. Usually you have a board up with cute/embarrassing pictures of you as a little kid, all the way up through high school. Usually your relatives give you a card and money. Some people really go all out with catering and shit, but I think we just had sloppy joes and typical low key summer food.

I did always think it was kind of weird that we celebrated graduating from high school so much more than graduating college or grad school... because high school is pretty fucking easy to graduate, not sure it deserves a party and presents, LOL. For college I just went out to dinner with my parents/aunt/grandma and then out to bars with friends, and the day I defended my MS thesis I just went out to lunch with my boyfriend afterwards and that was it. I don't think anyone gave me any presents for graduating college (not that I expected it!) but it was also my 21st birthday so my parents and aunt did give me presents for that :)

Anyway, back on topic, I like everyone else's suggestions for gifts :)

galliver

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Re: Graduation Gifts
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2014, 08:50:24 AM »
Does anyone have a good recommendation for graduation gifts? I've got two non-typical parties this year that I kinda need help with-

A) High school graduate that is not going to college
B) College graduate

I could do money, but the college grad already has a good paying job and doesn't need my $$. Money is kind of a lame gift anyway- there's got to be something better than that out there.

Any suggestions? I was thinking maybe a book of some sort. A gift that will keep on giving would be preferable.

I've not heard of this before.  A party among peers..yes, but hosted by friends/family...no.   

I mean, I have no problem if someone wishes to celebrate a milestone such as this...but gifts?  Absolutely not.

Yeah,  it's very common in the US. Actually in our society I think graduation gifts make more sense than wedding gifts, since we now expect people to become independent when they turn 18/graduate HS/graduate college rather than when they marry. And getting a leg up on supplies for independent living makes sense as an objective of gift-giving.