Author Topic: Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado  (Read 2972 times)

croco

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Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado
« on: July 25, 2014, 10:31:56 PM »
Hi All!

I have a gas line in my house for heating. I want to extend it to make hookups in the kitchen for a range, in the laundry for a gas dryer, and, while I am at it, for the backyard grill. I want to do the work myself, it looks like I can handle it.

The question I am hoping to understand is the permits and inspections. I've been googling and browsing the Douglas county web site for a while now but cannot seem to get a straight answer whether I can do the work myself as the house owner, or I must hire a licensed contractor. If I can do the work myself, do I need a permit? Do I need inspections? At what times? If I just go ahead and do the work, who will know if everything is done to code, and the line is already here, I am not adding a new one, just extending?

Any info on these issues would be great, or some advice how to figure it out.

Thanks!

TomTX

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Re: Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2014, 06:04:28 AM »
Call up the county permit office and ask.

Greg

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Re: Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2014, 09:59:21 AM »
Second the phone call suggestion.  Often websites and such can't address all the possible questions or for lawyer's sake are too complex to understand.

Likely you can do the work yourself, likely you should get a permit.  Also likely that if you didn't get a permit, no one would know or even care unless you did something wrong and blow your house up.

Typically for an extension as you plan, the first thing would be to install a ball valve at the extension beginning so that the new parts can be tested separately from the existing.  A ball valve should also be used at each planned outlet, or capped if you create a provision for future use.

Usually a pressure gauge and time are needed to test.  Usually there's only one inspection, some places you can "self-certify" that you performed the test.

From their website (http://www.douglas.co.us/building/sequence-of-inspections/):
"Interior Gas Line

This inspection is typically performed at the same time as the Rough Frame inspection.  The pipe system must be completed and tested with a 10 pound air test on a maximum 30 pound gauge, unless alternative piping is used."

« Last Edit: July 26, 2014, 10:01:55 AM by Greg »

croco

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Re: Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2014, 11:37:17 AM »
Hi again!

It's been a while but I am now actually close to the aforementioned pressure test. I did get the permit, and the work is mostly done.

The county told me that the inspector will expect the system to be "on test" when he arrives.

1. It sounds like I need to turn off the gas at the meter. Do you guys know if I am allowed to do that or I need to get the Xcel to do that, and then turn it back? It sounds like I have to have the whole system on test, not just the new installation.

2. Is it ok to pump air into the gas line? I mean, that sounds like a recipe for blowing stuff up to me. If not, how do I purge the line before pumping it?

3. I hear that older grease valves do not withstand the test pressure, and i should just cap off the pipes. How do I find out if my old valves are that kind? Must I cap off anyways or if the valves are all modern, I can just close the valves?

Thanks!

ncornilsen

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Re: Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2014, 11:42:54 AM »
I always turned it off at the meter myself. needed a cresent wrench to turn it.
You should disconnect your gas meter, regulator, etc from the gas line.
You should valve off, disconnect, CAP, then open the valves, to each appliance. Nat Gas valves don't always seal close against test pressure, but won't leak it out of the stem if the valve is open.
It is OK to pump air in there. On most things, it just takes a little while to let the air purse through while holding a match. I've never had much trouble. My furnace needed a couple of resets after two subsequent "no light" faults, but that was it.


Greg

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Re: Gas line modification in Douglas county, Colorado
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2014, 10:46:49 AM »
I would recommend (or would have) a valve inline between old and new work, so that you can test just the new.  That's how it's done by my plumber when I have a remodel project for a client.