Author Topic: Garage Apron  (Read 1522 times)

LearningMustachian72

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Garage Apron
« on: June 04, 2018, 01:15:02 PM »
Hi!

Putting in a garage apron and debating cold patch, pavers or concrete.  I have 12 inches from my driveway sawed and dug out.

Any suggestions or tips?

ohmylookatthat

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2018, 05:12:26 PM »
try to use nylon tape

Dicey

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2018, 06:49:10 PM »
Why are you doing this? Do you have drainage problems?

LearningMustachian72

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2018, 08:09:24 AM »
There is a downspout on one side of my garage and the driveway in front of the garage is not slanted away, which lead to water and ice accumulating in the front of my garage.

Dicey

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2018, 08:50:30 AM »
What is your plan to move the water away from the foundation? Are you installing drainage or just changing the pitch?

LearningMustachian72

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2018, 08:54:02 AM »
No, I put drain tile from my downspout, across my driveway to the back of my property....that is the main reason I dug out the 1 ft in front of my garage. 

Now I am determining what is the best method to patch it back up.

Dicey

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2018, 09:54:28 AM »
Okay. DH is the expert. I'll ask him tonight and get back to you. My hunch is that he's going to say "concrete" because if poured properly, it won't settle the way the others are prone to. Did you put a bed of compacted sand/gravel under the drain tile to keep it level?

LearningMustachian72

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2018, 10:05:44 AM »
Yes, we compacted gravel under the drain tile. 

I appreciate you reaching out to your contact!  The guy at my local tool rental place also recommended concrete but to expand the apron to 3ft.  We are a little nervous doing this ourselves as we have not poured concrete before.

Therefore, was wondering if pavers or cold patch would hold up for the 1 ft apron we have now.

If concrete is indeed the best solution, any instructional articles/videos would be much appreciated.

Thanks again!

Fishindude

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2018, 10:07:26 AM »
I'd do concrete, minimum 3' width with at least 1" of fall sloped away from garage slab in that 3'.
If you are someplace that experiences freeze / thaw cycles, you will want to "pin" that apron to the garage slab with rebar dowels so it doesn't heave upward where they join together.
A good 4" to 6" of compacted crushed stone under an apron is always a good idea too.

Pennycounter

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2018, 10:29:55 AM »
Agreed 100% with fishin dude.  Make sure you have at least #4's in the apron doweled into the rest of the driveway or garage slab. 

LearningMustachian72

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2018, 10:31:55 AM »
@Fishindude & @Pennycounter

Definitely all for doing what is best quality but this sounds above my skill/experience level.  Do you think I would be able to do this properly having never done something like this before?

If not, do you think if I fitted the 1' I currently have with pavers or cold patch, it would hold up?

Fishindude

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2018, 02:06:07 PM »

Definitely all for doing what is best quality but this sounds above my skill/experience level.  Do you think I would be able to do this properly having never done something like this before?
Yes if you have someone to kind of coach you along.   It's pretty tough physical work but not all that technical.

If not, do you think if I fitted the 1' I currently have with pavers or cold patch, it would hold up?
This will be a pretty short term fix, more of a patch job.

Pennycounter

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #12 on: June 05, 2018, 02:40:28 PM »
It depends on how handy you are in general. Placing concrete is not hard but it is laborious. I do not place my own concrete because I'm just not strong enough and everything is HEAVY.  Concrete is NOT difficult, just intimidating. Even with a wonky finish it will

I think installing pavers would take almost as much work to get right as concrete so I would steer clear.

You could certainly go with bags of cold patch as a hinky solution. Be prepared to repatch regularly when it settles or is displaced but that is relatively easy.  I would not but if the option is leave it as compacted rock for 3 years or cold patch, then go for it. 

Sojourner

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #13 on: June 05, 2018, 11:46:22 PM »
If you do your own concrete pour, you will be renting the mixer I assume.  I would not use quikcrete type pre mixed sacks.  It doesn't finish as well as using a raw 3-2-1 mix of 3/4" gravel, sand, and cement (respectively).  Do a simple calc to determine how much of each material you will need to achieve the volume of concrete you will need.  Of course, have all your rebar or wire mesh in place with any 2x wood forms properly pre-installed with necessary slopes.  Consider placing an empty 4" diameter length of drain pipe across (below) the entire width of the intended pour (in case you want to run any sort of future lines below your concrete from one side to the other, underground).  Even if you never use this empty conduit, it's a cheap nice-to-have.  You may thank yourself later.

If the overall pour is greater area than you think you can handle in a day, consider splitting the work into 2 parts.  Do one half one day, next half the next day.  Pour up to a piece of form you set at the mid point.  The next day remove that piece of formwork and complete the second half of the pour.
 
Also, have a tool ready to create control joints at intervals to control any cracking that may occur down the road.  Install the control joints while the concrete is freshly poured and still very wet.  If it gets too dry, this will be much more difficult.  To get a nice uniform finish, use a screed board, which can simply be a 2x4 of adequate length.  Work it on end, back and forth as you pour the concrete to even it out.  You will need to work somewhat quickly, but usually there's not too much of a rush.  Having a helper is best.  For example, one person can be mixing the concrete in the mixer and the other placing it.  At a certain point, the wet concrete will begin to dry enough that you can begin to trowel the surface to achieve a finish.  You can broom finish a bit later when the concrete is more dry in order to create a non-slip surface.

Probably tons of related Youtube videos.

Perhaps post some photos so folks here can make more informed suggestions.

affordablehousing

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2018, 12:06:33 PM »
#1 learning resource is looking at Odell Complete Concrete's video series on Youtube, the guy has a reassuring voice and is a complete master. Go through the videos but check out the ones where he's adding on to a slab, and thus doweling and epoxying in, he also does a lot with drainage. He talks a lot about mix too. If it were me, I would hire a laborer to help me, and in particular one who's experienced with putting the kind of finish you want with a float or trowel to match what you have already. Otherwise, as others have said, concrete is just a lot of heavy work. Watch OCC's videos and you'll be more confident.

Fishindude

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #15 on: June 07, 2018, 01:55:15 PM »
Buy ready mix concrete delivered, don't mix by hand or with a mixer.
You'll pay a small order premium fee but it will be good quality material and one less thing to worry about.

Sojourner

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2018, 09:10:33 PM »
Can readily be done using a mixer for a small job with quality results, but of course ordering a truck is easier (higher cost).  Just depends on how much DIY you're up for.  Done this many times.  It's a fun and rewarding project.  Hiring a skilled finish laborer and pre mix truck, well that's not DIY, but nothing wrong with that if you don't feel comfortable about it.  I don't think you mentioned how wide the pour will be.  If it's over about 2 CY and you've never done this before, yeah consider hiring it out.

No responses, maybe the OP abandoned the thread.

Dicey

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Re: Garage Apron
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2018, 01:30:06 AM »
No responses, maybe the OP abandoned the thread.
Wait, I see four responses. Maybe OP is busy watching You Tube videos or trying to get a contractor to return their call. Or maybe they got their boots stuck in concrete. Just kidding on that last one. Patience, Sojourner.