Author Topic: For those European stock investors...  (Read 2065 times)

Baylor3217

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For those European stock investors...
« on: June 20, 2013, 07:59:44 PM »
As America moves closer and closer to full blown socialism, can you give us some perspective on how long term investing in your European stock markets has gone?

I've been fortunate to accumulate a fair among of wealth but want to keep a finger to which way the wind is blowing.

pom

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Re: For those European stock investors...
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2013, 08:11:08 AM »
Lets compare the last 20 years, the returns are roughly:

France: 7.0% per annum
Germany: 7.5% per annum
US: 8.5% per annum

So it's been lower in Europe but certainly not the disaster that your question seems to imply.

My wife is Romanian and grew up under Nicolae Ceaușescu and even that is not considered "full-blown".

You really think that the US is going socialist?

Do you really think that countries like France are socialist even though there are 2.3 million millionnaires and two of the top 10 richest people in the world?

Baylor3217

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Re: For those European stock investors...
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2013, 10:10:17 PM »
That's great info. I'm trying to better to better understand how governments who have blown up their credit card ultimately affected the stock market which is generally the best way to acquire wealth.

America has been moving more and more towards socialism for decades. This is not new with Obama but has accelerated. Socialism tends to provide a floor but significantly reduces te average persons ceiling.

My personal goal is to prepare myself, If necessary, based on lessons we could learn from those that have gone down this path before them.

In my limited research, it seems those that could in European countries invested in the US market. If that option were blunted, not saying it would be but trying to learn based on other social experiments, what would that do for those of us who by luck or hard work or talent or all of the above were able to accumate and invest more than the average person?

It introduces another variable to the data we have from the last as more and more money goes to socialization and regulation.

Maybe the result will be negligible. Time will tell.

I have t changed my approach at all yet and may never but was curious if others have considered this potential risk to their stache.

Lets compare the last 20 years, the returns are roughly:

France: 7.0% per annum
Germany: 7.5% per annum
US: 8.5% per annum

So it's been lower in Europe but certainly not the disaster that your question seems to imply.

My wife is Romanian and grew up under Nicolae Ceaușescu and even that is not considered "full-blown".

You really think that the US is going socialist?

Do you really think that countries like France are socialist even though there are 2.3 million millionnaires and two of the top 10 richest people in the world?