Author Topic: Food Nostalgia  (Read 9649 times)

Miamoo

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Food Nostalgia
« on: February 16, 2015, 10:18:24 AM »
Just curious.

We live in a rural community that consists of people mainly Swedish or German descent, that have evolved sadly into just boring white people with no cultural affinity when it comes to food.  (Am I using the right words here?)  At any rate, it was almost impossible to find much besides iceberg lettuce and prepackaged foods here until recently.

A new grocery store has opened in town.

They offer so much more. 

Perusing the deli counter yesterday I noticed that they now offer so many more meat and cheese selections.

Bought a half pound of "Prasky" (Hubs is 100% Bohemian-the country-not the lifestyle)

Here's his reaction . . . .

http://youtu.be/5LaVzxHIR4Y

I'd be interested in others food nostalgia. 




KD

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2015, 10:28:53 AM »
I think that there has to be a cook in the family that is interested in preserving the cultural food traditions.  Usually requires more work than most Americans want to put into things though. 

Hubs is of PA Dutch/German descent.  I try to make a few things of his cultural heritage thru the year.  They are more special events type of things than in the weekly rotation of foods.

We do live near an Amish community that we travel thru on the way to visit family so some goods are available there that aren't usually available elsewhere.  One food he particularly likes is Lebanon Bologna and every other deli in the area looks at you like your head is screwed on sideways when you ask for it.

IMHO, the homogenization of America is rather sickening.

Miamoo

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2015, 10:45:51 AM »
From KD.  You are so right.

"IMHO, the homogenization of America is rather sickening."

And . . .

"I think that there has to be a cook in the family that is interested in preserving the cultural food traditions.  Usually requires more work than most Americans want to put into things though

I'm Irish and can boil or burn anything you'd like to death.

I have learned of so many different (Mustachian) foods over the years of living with this dude.  Nothing and I mean nothing goes to waste.


Miamoo

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2015, 10:49:31 AM »
Good grief, I don't know how to work this bolding thing.

Thanks KD.  Most Americans wouldn't bother.

savedough

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2015, 02:33:05 PM »
I don't see homogenization.   I look at what a typical cookbook included years ago versus now and I think the food culture is growing.   We seek out ethnic restaurants at every opportunity and I check cookbooks out from the library to try and replicate.   Despite living in Montana, which is not exactly a cultural food mecca, I can find most of the ingredients I need at our grocery stores.

I truly think we have access to so much.

KD

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2015, 03:39:23 PM »
Hmmm, well savedough I came to that viewpoint thru travel and seeing the same franchise restaurants all over the U.S. of A.  To the point that it has made most US travel a big old giant yawn for me.

Perhaps the food trucks will save us from dying of food boredom????  One can hope!

savedough

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2015, 05:58:30 AM »
I agree that most restaurants are the same burger, chicken pasta blandness.   We don't eat out much unless we are traveling and then we look for local specialties or something we don't have at home.  I was basing my view on what I can get at the grocery store which I think has increased twenty fold in the last forty years.

MayDay

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2015, 06:46:24 AM »
My family's food traditions involve things like wonder bread, fried bologna (how the beck do you spell that?) And spam.  No one is a recent immigrant, and they were poor, so cheap junk is what my parents grew up on. My grandparents grew up on "whatever we could scrounge or grow during the depression".

The one exception is my Danish great grandmother. But she died in her 30's so nothing was handed down. My mom does have one Danish cookbook but I have no idea if it's culturally accurate.

It's my sister and I who ha 've gotten away from std. American junk, and I think it's an improvement over what we were raised on.

tlars699

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2015, 10:41:49 AM »
I don't see homogenization.   I look at what a typical cookbook included years ago versus now and I think the food culture is growing.   We seek out ethnic restaurants at every opportunity and I check cookbooks out from the library to try and replicate.   Despite living in Montana, which is not exactly a cultural food mecca, I can find most of the ingredients I need at our grocery stores.

I truly think we have access to so much.

Except that there is this huge separation for the process of cooking now.
Joy of Cooking may have stuck to European and French cooking back in the day(my book is from the 1970's), but they show you how to butcher your own meat for everything from a side of beef to squirrels and rabbits.

Modern cookbooks also focus way more on the pictures than the processes. The best cookbooks are those that have both, of course, but the process of cooking has become super simplified, and not necessarily in a good way.

I will agree that access to a wider range of ingredients has increased, but nobody knows how to use them due to the homogenization of what is convenient.

KD

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2015, 12:31:03 PM »
One way for a Mustachian to increase utilization of international type recipes is to remember that spices are generally cheap if you buy just enough (bulk) to do the deed...no need to buy a big can of something if the recipe only calls for a tsp.  You might get funny looks at the store, but ehhhh - Mustachians be hardy folk.

Miamoo

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2015, 12:55:55 PM »
One way for a Mustachian to increase utilization of international type recipes is to remember that spices are generally cheap if you buy just enough (bulk) to do the deed...no need to buy a big can of something if the recipe only calls for a tsp.  You might get funny looks at the store, but ehhhh - Mustachians be hardy folk.

If that's not possible, like where we live now - the spices can be frozen indefinitely as far as I know.

Otherwise we grow and then dry or freeze whatever we can - that will grow here.

Yeah MayDay - same here.  Fried bologna, Spam, beans & weenies.  I learned a lot along the way by working in Greek restaurants, from my AfricanAmerican girl friends, now from my MIL.  And traveling around the US.  When traveling KD ya gotta go off the beaten path.  If you pop into a grocery store or even at the gas station - ask a local.

I do still make beans and weenies (with a side of cornbread and greens) once in a while now . . .

savedough

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2015, 01:00:55 PM »
Except that there is this huge separation for the process of cooking now.
Joy of Cooking may have stuck to European and French cooking back in the day(my book is from the 1970's), but they show you how to butcher your own meat for everything from a side of beef to squirrels and rabbits.

Modern cookbooks also focus way more on the pictures than the processes. The best cookbooks are those that have both, of course, but the process of cooking has become super simplified, and not necessarily in a good way.

I will agree that access to a wider range of ingredients has increased, but nobody knows how to use them due to the homogenization of what is convenient.

I think saying nobody knows how to use them is overgeneralizing.    In my circle of friends, there are quite a few very good and adventurous cooks.  We share ingredients that are specialized and it makes for tasty meals.     Cooking instructions have been dumbed down quite a bit, but that doesn't mean the dishes are any less ethnic, creative or different.    I mean eggs in gelatin (aspic??  is that right??) - I don't want to eat that, but wasabi deviled eggs - delish!

I also grew up with a mom who loved to cook and made us try everything and then help in the kitchen as we got older.  She cooked EVERYTHING and still can.

Probably the average American doesnt cook well or often and I just happen to be lucky to find frugal, foodie friends and grow up in an adventurous family.  My reality may be skewed.

MayDay

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2015, 01:04:39 PM »
Has anyone seen the "20 most revolting jello salads" type of Facebook posts?  My grandmas loved those too. 

Whoever first put vegetables in jello, and then convinced decades of housewives that is was a good idea, should be jailed.  What a crime.  But meat + jello.?  Really?  I would love to understand that thought process. 

KD

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2015, 01:07:21 PM »
The last ten years has been resort travel w/a gifted to me timeshare exchange and we do most of the cooking in the suite w/only a few meals out.  I make the menu out before we leave hoome and take a box of food with us, hit the grocery store after we've settled in.  So, maybe on a weeks vacation we'll eat OUT three times...a breakfast, a lunch, and a dinner, so it isn't too bad and yes we do ask for recommendations and follow up on them - still there are just way too many franchises in the US in my opinion.  Nowadays the thing we enjoy more than eating out which used to be more of a treat on vacation is visiting various wineries and bringing home some excellent wines to enjoy later in the year.

Miamoo

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2015, 01:16:10 PM »
Has anyone seen the "20 most revolting jello salads" type of Facebook posts?  My grandmas loved those too. 

Whoever first put vegetables in jello, and then convinced decades of housewives that is was a good idea, should be jailed.  What a crime.  But meat + jello.?  Really?  I would love to understand that thought process.


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH!  I haven't seen the revolting jello salads on FB but inherited 20 or so small cookbooks that were published by Good Housekeeping in 1958.  One of them has loads of those aspic & gelatin recipes.

Thought process?  They were purty? 

Miamoo

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2015, 01:30:33 PM »
But my original question had to do with food nostalgia.  I was wondering actually what sort of foods you grew up with that you still might crave or make now.  Maybe I worded it wrong.

Eg:  My husband loves his Bohemian stuff.  I still make the beans & weenies once in a while.  And I love what we used to call "Goop" (cuz there was no name for it).  "Goop" was just a pound of ground beef browned, some bullion, some flour & water to make a gravy, dumped on a pile of mashed potatoes, with a can of sweet peas dumped on top of that.

THAT was a dinner!!!  And I still make it.

That's what I was looking for.

savedough

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #16 on: February 17, 2015, 02:42:09 PM »
Crab bisque,   Smoked salmon,  raspberry anything and fruit salad with marshmallows.    Growing up in the pacific  NW, we ate a lot of fish.   Every summer our raspberry bushes would produce pounds and pounds of berries,  so many that we would freeze them and enjoy all year round.

I also loved sharing artichokes with lemon butter with my mom and splitting oranges with my dad for dessert.   

Oh and burnt bread.   Despite being an amazing cook, my mom regularly burnt garlic bread.

Miamoo

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #17 on: February 17, 2015, 02:48:58 PM »
Crab bisque,   Smoked salmon,  raspberry anything and fruit salad with marshmallows.    Growing up in the pacific  NW, we ate a lot of fish.   Every summer our raspberry bushes would produce pounds and pounds of berries,  so many that we would freeze them and enjoy all year round.

I also loved sharing artichokes with lemon butter with my mom and splitting oranges with my dad for dessert.   

Oh and burnt bread.   Despite being an amazing cook, my mom regularly burnt garlic bread.

Now THAT'S what I was looking for savedough.  Dang were you lucky.  Any recipes?  Do you still make these foods once in a while?

savedough

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2015, 03:13:02 PM »
Sure.   I'll post the crab bisque recipe tonight.     I was and am very lucky, but I'm not sure I realized it at the time.   I wanted a Lunchable like all the other kids in my class, not smoked salmon and crackers.    I wanted Oreos for dessert, not a piece of fruit.  But time has given me a perspective and appreciation for the exposure I did have.  The one processed food that makes me nostalgic is Cup of Noodles.   In the winter, in order to cut costs when we went skiing, my mom would pack us a cup of noodles (like ramen in a styrofoam cup) so all we had to do was add hot water.  That and instant hot cider packets.     

My husband, on the other hand, loves his southern BBQ sauce (think vinegar style), boiled peanuts, Mountain Dew, Chex Mix, and Kraft Mac and Cheese.   Even my homemade baked mac and cheese is a distant second to the blue box for him.  Chex Mix and Mountain Dew is his game day food of choice, party food of choice, pot luck contribution of choice.

I wonder what will remind my kids of their childhood. 

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #19 on: February 17, 2015, 03:34:04 PM »
Crab bisque,   Smoked salmon,  raspberry anything and fruit salad with marshmallows.    Growing up in the pacific  NW, we ate a lot of fish.   Every summer our raspberry bushes would produce pounds and pounds of berries,  so many that we would freeze them and enjoy all year round.

I also loved sharing artichokes with lemon butter with my mom and splitting oranges with my dad for dessert.   

Oh and burnt bread.   Despite being an amazing cook, my mom regularly burnt garlic bread.

Wow, that all sounds delicious and amazing!!

Like others, most of the nostalgic foods of my childhood are processed and frankly kinda gross sounding, although a Spam sandwich still sounds appealing... I ate bologna and ketchup sandwiches and Spam sandwiches with my dad, oh and braunschweiger-on-toast sandwiches which I still eat, especially when I visit my parents... my dad and I could eat braunschweiger endlessly but no one else gets it, LOL. Whatever, more braunschweiger for me! I also ate a lot of Kraft mac and cheese with ketchup (yeah, total ketchup obsession) and Hamburger Helper. But the top two for nostalgia would be my grandma's egg bake, which I still make for Easter every year (god it's so good, and a total heart attack in a pan), and my mom's "chewy no-bake bars," the ones with a base layer made with Special K and peanut butter and a top layer made with melted chocolate and butterscotch chips. Mmmmm!!

sheepstache

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2015, 03:46:18 PM »
Has anyone seen the "20 most revolting jello salads" type of Facebook posts?  My grandmas loved those too. 

Whoever first put vegetables in jello, and then convinced decades of housewives that is was a good idea, should be jailed.  What a crime.  But meat + jello.?  Really?  I would love to understand that thought process.


AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH!  I haven't seen the revolting jello salads on FB but inherited 20 or so small cookbooks that were published by Good Housekeeping in 1958.  One of them has loads of those aspic & gelatin recipes.

Thought process?  They were purty?

See my understanding is that the use of gelatin was related to tough economic times. It took artistry but not a lot of money to decorate with aspic--jello being sort of the unartistic poor-man's version, also the celebration of new materials created through industry and technology, like how people came up with way too many uses for aluminum foil, plywood, polyester, etc., when those came out. (James Lileks has an amazing, amusing, time sink of a site about all the advertising these sorts of trends generated and general nostalgia.)

And that's the thing, a lot of food traditions are related to necessity.  Fermented cabbage? Tripe? People didn't do these things to be culturally diverse or gourmands, they did it because they were trying to get the most out of their limited resources. True, in some areas that meant you ate a much wider range of things, but in some areas it didn't.

Professor Ecks

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2015, 03:56:08 PM »
I pretty much still make the dishes I grew up on, so sadly, most of my food nostalgia revolves around restaurant food no longer available to me.

Like early-90s Taco Bell tasted SO much better than the crap they serve now (bring back black olives!)

And Hardee's (AKA Carl's Junior) used to serve the Big Roast Beef sandwich. Yum. They also did fried chicken for a bit, which was surprisingly good.

Others are just chains that I used to loved that no longer exist (at least in my area) like: Bennigans, Black Eyed Pea, Grandy's, Checker's, Fuddrucker's, Hot N' Now, Po' Folks, Shoney's, and Country Kitchen.

Oh, and I miss the Stuffed Double Deckeroni from Old Chicago.

geekette

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2015, 04:39:56 PM »
My husband, on the other hand, loves his southern BBQ sauce (think vinegar style), boiled peanuts, Mountain Dew, Chex Mix, and Kraft Mac and Cheese.   
Yum.  Except skip the boiled peanuts and add country ham and red eye gravy.  With canned flaky biscuits, of course!

<small voice> I still cook this for brunch every couple of weeks.  Can't wean DH off the canned biscuits. </sv>

PEIslander

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2015, 05:20:32 PM »
Here's a link with pics that will help you remember the kinds of recipes that used a can of soup or gelatin (or both): https://www.homemadebyyou.co.uk/articles/fun-stuff/15-utterly-revolting-retro-recipes.

Getting serious -- The comfort food I adored as a child was roast beef with yorkshire pudding (popovers) at my grandmothers house. I also remember being about in grade 3 and going on a field trip to a "pioneer village". They had a cheese maker and we were given samples of a sharp white cheddar. It was the best cheese I'd ever tasted. Funny thing is I still remember its taste and texture so vividly. It has been the standard by which I judged cheddar for almost 45-years.

MayDay

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2015, 05:32:14 PM »
Ass far as dishes I remember fondly:

I know I loved fried bologna dipped in mayo as a little kid, but I tried it once as a teenager for nostalgia, and it was revolting. 

My favorite meal as a teenager was stir fry.  This was made with those frozen stir fry kits.  Now I still love stir fry, but real stir fry, not that soupy steamed junk. 

We always had either canned green beans or canned spinach as our vegetable side dish.  Mmmm mmmmm.  I still love those.  Only the salt kinds though, the low sodium stuff is nasty.  I think the salt covers up the fact that the veggies are nasty. 

We loved Kraft Mac and cheese, and my brother still loves it. 

My sister loves green bean casserole like mad.  She has tried to make "less disgusting" versions without all cream o crap soup and canned beans. 

We always had vichyssoise soup for Christmas Eve.  We still make that.  The kids hate it, hopefully they will grow into it. 

2 recipes from my grandma that we still make (although healthy-fixed versions with whole wheat flour) are blueberry tea cake and cinnamon tea ring. 

From my other grandma, we make a bunch of dessert recipes.  The most famous amongst the family, and most original, is bread pudding.  It came from Germany, and is this thick pudding with about a dozen egg yolks.  We make that a couple times a year but it is soooooo unhealthy.  She also made lots of pies, but they are fairly generic- coconut cream, etc.  So there are recipes all over the internet that are pretty similar to what she made. 

For us the hue issue with food traditions is that we are vegetarian.  That rules out all the main dish meals of our grandmothers. 

pipercat

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2015, 06:00:23 PM »
Chocolate gravy over hot biscuits for breakfast.  So good!

MrsPete

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #26 on: February 17, 2015, 06:20:43 PM »
I agree that the number of ingredients available to us has widely increased, and with the advent of the internet it's super easy to find new recipes.  I'm always trying new things.  Lately we've been experimenting with Scottish foods in honor of my husband's heritage.  Hint:  Cockaleekie soup is delicious, but fight your temptation to eliminate the prunes -- yes, they do belong in soup. 

Having said that, I also cook lots of old things that we ate when I was growing up:  Just today I had a fried livermush sandwich with mustard.  YUM.  Homemade egg nog, the BEST stuffing ever, Eggs Benedict.  I can pluck a chicken, process fresh-butchered pork, and can vegetables.  I'm not so good with pickles.  But I've dropped other things that I never really liked:  Salmon patties made from a can and hominy, for example. 


Annamal

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2015, 09:37:40 PM »
Nostalgia-wise (I am tremendously thankful that vegetables in jelly never made it to NZ, although condensed milk mayonnaise is kind of icky):

My grandmother's Christmas cake and fruit mince pies (we had some of her mince pies this Christmas and they are still amazing)
My family's gigantic home-made pizza with yeast bread (not traditional Italian but still good), actually come to think of it,
Tua tua (shellfish similar to a mussel but prone to living buried in the sand) roasting on a barbecue although that was more about the fun of gathering them than the actual taste

wileyish

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2015, 09:45:33 PM »
My maternal grandmother was Polish and cooked everything from scratch. For my 30th birthday my mother gave me a compilation book of our “family” recipes. Most start with something like: add a cube of butter, a cup of lard, and the grease from frying bacon. Heh. There’s only about two or three recipes I make from that book, but I do love to flip through it occasionally and reminisce about the Kielbasas, kraut, and potato pancakes slathered in applesauce and sour cream. The fun part is that Ma and I are still adding to the book so its interesting to see the evolution of the recipes (raw kale, oh yeah!).

I’ve only tried this one once and used water because I didn’t have evaporated milk on hand (who does?) so it was kind of a soupy mess. And I’m too embarrassed to buy Crisco. Anyway, here’s Grandmother Wileyish’s baba recipe:

Potato Pancakes (Baba)

5 large potatoes (peeled and cubed)
1/2 large onion (cubed)
3 TBSP flour (or more as needed)
Evaporated milk as needed
4 eggs
1/2 TSP salt
1/2 TSP pepper
2 TSP sugar
Crisco (!) for frying

Liquify potatoes and onion in blender a bit at a time until liquified. Pour into bowl and add remaining ingredients, blending well. Add flour and/or milk as needed to make it into “pancake batter” consistency. Drop from large spoon into hot oil and fry until golden. Serve with applesauce and sour cream.

kathrynd

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #29 on: February 17, 2015, 11:14:06 PM »
I'm 54.
Poptarts were such a treat growing up. My favorite was unfrosted blueberry (I can't buy them anymore)
I will still buy Poptarts if they are on sale...and usually eat them all within a day or two.

Things i still make from my childhood:

Creamed peas (canned) on toast.

Creamed asparagus (canned) on toast.

Toasted tomato and mayo sandwiches

Fried bologna ( it is very expensive now) wth canned baked beans w/molasses

shipwreck casserole (layers of hamburg, onion, sliced potatoes, carrots..with tomato soup)

goulash (macaroni, hamburg, onions, tomato soup)

shephards pie casserole (veg soup mixed wiith cooked hamburg, with a layer of mashed potatoes over the top)

yummmmm

Kaydedid

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2015, 11:21:06 PM »
My mom's family is from Northern Germany, and the women all cooked from scratch.  I miss the baked goods most of all - homemade bread, lebkuchen,  pfefferkuchen, etc.
They also did homemade spaetzle cooked in chicken broth, which I tried to replicate with the boxed stuff - not the same at all.
We also had potato pancakes, and chicken soup with dumplings that was to die for.

sweetproserpina

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2015, 05:30:35 AM »
My dad was a great cook, but cooked the usual things- chicken, pasta, burgers etc. Everything homemade though, but no real traditions. My husband's family is straight from Norway, and I've learned a few recipes from his childhood that everyone likes. So we eat norwegian meatballs regularly, and Norwegian pancakes when I've got lots of time! My mother-in-law belongs to "daughters of norway" and they put out a small, authentic cookbook every so often, which is a great resource. I draw the line at fiskbol though... floating codfish balls, err, no thanks.

One thing my mum and I do is can a couple family recipes every year. My Ukrainian grandma's dill pickle recipe, and my great great grandmother's chili sauce recipe. My kids will literally only eat our homemade dills, we are pickle snobs 😊

rocksinmyhead

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2015, 08:53:15 AM »
We always had either canned green beans or canned spinach as our vegetable side dish.  Mmmm mmmmm.  I still love those.  Only the salt kinds though, the low sodium stuff is nasty.  I think the salt covers up the fact that the veggies are nasty. 

Haha, my boyfriend and I keep talking about this lately... those canned French-cut green beans! With butter and salt... mmmm.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #33 on: February 18, 2015, 09:13:23 AM »
Crab bisque,   Smoked salmon,  raspberry anything and fruit salad with marshmallows.    Growing up in the pacific  NW, we ate a lot of fish.   Every summer our raspberry bushes would produce pounds and pounds of berries,  so many that we would freeze them and enjoy all year round.

I also loved sharing artichokes with lemon butter with my mom and splitting oranges with my dad for dessert.   

Oh and burnt bread.   Despite being an amazing cook, my mom regularly burnt garlic bread.

Another NW kid checking in. We would do a crab boil then eat the meat with melted butter or mayo. Tons of smoked salmon and halibut. Blackberry cobbler in the summer (or better yet, eating the berries fresh when they're still warm from the sun). Clam chowder. Venison stew. Elk cube steak topped with sausage gravy.

I don't know if this counts though since I still eat all of this pretty often (except the cobbler, haven't made that in a couple years). Less unique but still nostalgic- kudos bars, cheese sandwiches on potato bread, and costco pumpkin pies. Oh! And we would top tortillas with cream cheese, black olives, and alfalfa sprouts. Mmmmmm.

kathrynd

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Re: Food Nostalgia
« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2015, 09:23:01 AM »
oh...and fried potatoes dipped in mayo


love them