Author Topic: Flat Bike Tires  (Read 2819 times)

acepedro45

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Flat Bike Tires
« on: August 21, 2018, 08:20:57 AM »
Hi Mustache People,

Can you cycling experts speculate about my bike tires? I do a regular 4 mile round trip bike commute to work most days. I get flats seemingly quite often, maybe 4-5 in the last 6 months. Could I be doing something wrong?

A. This is normal incidence - I should expect flat tires every so often with this much bike use.

B. Maybe I'm changing my tubes improperly - I'm shamefully ignorant on bike maintenance. Is there a wrong way to change a tire? I've watched a few videos and asked questions while the bike shop changed my tires in the past.

My last change I didn't even use the two plastic tire levers to get the tire on and off. I just put the tube in place, wrestled the tire on, and then filled up at the gas station. That lasted only a month. Some recommend partially inflating the tube as you put it in place but I didn't do this. I've never patched a tube - I just replace.

C. Maybe I'm using cheapo Walmart tubes that don't hold up - In fact I am! Do you think these aren't good enough for normal commuting? I'm using $4 Duro tubes...but I have at least verified they are the correct diameter and width for my bike. Limited reviews online but maybe I'm going too cheap here.

D. Maybe I'm riding over glass or sharp objects too much. One flat I attribute to a sharp stone that was unfortunately placed in my path, all the others I really don't know the cause.

E. Maybe my tires themselves are bad/not resistant enough to puncture. I replaced them a year or so back with new but cheap tires. I think I paid $50 for the pair at a bike shop (but a place I trust) and installed myself.

Speculation welcome.

PoutineLover

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2018, 08:25:16 AM »
That is way more often than I get flats. I would guess that it's the way you're changing it. By not partially inflating the tube, part of it could be wedged in wrong and wearing out too fast. When I changed my tube myself the first time that's what I did and I got a flat shortly after. I now get flats about once a year and it's usually from running over something sharp by accident. It's also important to check the tire, if a piece of glass is still wedged in there it'll puncture the next tube too.

RWD

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2018, 08:41:21 AM »
Not removing debris from inside the tire was my first thought. You say you are inflating at the gas station. Are you checking that the tire pressure is within the recommended range?

acepedro45

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2018, 08:53:29 AM »
I am checking tire pressure and inflating to the 70 psi posted on the sidewall. I have hybrid tires.

I characterized myself as "shamefully ignorant" about bike maintenance - but maybe that self assessment was a little harsh. I always check the tire for whatever caused the puncture and remove it if found. I usually try to locate the puncture on the tube and then inspect with extra scrutiny around the corresponding area on the tire.

Thing is these flats are a month apart or so and randomly distributed between front and back tire....that makes me think it's not just a case of a repeat offender puncturing the tire over and over.

sol

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2018, 08:54:14 AM »
It depends on what kind of flat you're getting.  Find the hole and post a picture for us.

If you google "pinch flat" you'll see pictures of tubes damaged by being compressed between the ground and the edge of the wheel.  These are more common with under inflated tired, and bumps like curbs.  Don't ride over curbs!  Also, make sure that your wheel is the right size for your tire, because pinch flats are more common with tires that too big (wide) for the wheel they're mounted on.

Or you might live in an area with lots of sharp stuff.  Could be broken glass on the side of the road, or some places have plants like goatheads that will leave little stickers in your tires. 

In either case, you need to

a) make sure your tire pressure is correct.  Thin tires need to be inflated every few days.  Big fat ones need to be inflated about every two weeks.  Overinflating will lead to blowouts.

b)  consider getting some new puncture resistant tires.  The gatorskinz are popular but the Panasonic ribmos are usually cheaper.  These are kevlar reinforced tires designed for city commuting.  These tires are too heavy for racers, where grams count, but they are lifesavers for commuters.  Alternately, you can consider getting some puncture tape, but the right tire is probably a better option and easier to install correctly.

edit:  a posted 70 psi sounds like a very medium sized tire, should be fine for commuting.  Still check the recommended wheel sizes for your tire just to be sure.  randomly distributed between front and back is good, because it means you probably don't have a rogue spoke causing the same hole over and over again.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2018, 08:56:47 AM by sol »

GuitarStv

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2018, 09:04:19 AM »
Off the top of my head, I'd check five things:

- Is there pokey shit still stuck in your tire?

When something pokey pushes through the thick rubber of your tire and punctures your tube, it doesn't go anywhere.  It stays stuck in your tire.  Often something can be stuck so that you can't see it from the outside of the tire.  When you replace the tube, you always need to run your fingers around the inside of the tire to make sure that there's nothing pokey still in there.  If there is, you need to pull it out (usually a pair of pliers will work great for this).


- Is your rim tape on properly and doing it's job?

The spokes go through a hole in the rim.  When you take your wheel off you will notice a piece of plastic-y kinda tape that sits over these holes.  It needs to cover every hole!  The edges of these holes are sharp and will puncture a tire.when it's inflated.  If your rim tape isn't in the right position, slide it to the correct spot and then wrap some hockey tape or medical around it to keep it in place.


- Is your tire often underinflated?

If you let your tires go too flat while cycling around, you will get punctures.  Why?  Because you can roll around on an underinflated tire for a while, but when you hit a big bump the tire will flex too much, the rim will hit the ground, and it will put two cuts in your tube (usually looks like a snake bite).  The solution to this one is simply to inflate your tire regularly (at least once a week).


- Are you pinching the tube while changing your tire?

When you change a tube, sometimes the tire is very tight going back on the rim.  It can be pretty easy to catch part of the tube under the bead of the tire unless you put a little bit of air in the tube (just enough so that it starts to take a round donut shape) before mounting the tire.  Usually you will see a slight bulge when you start inflating the tire if the tube is stuck under the bead, so put 5 - 10 psi into the tire and then spin it to check.  If the tube under the bead doesn't blow when you inflate it, it will get a hole and go flat eventually as you ride around on it because of the rubbing of the bead on the fragile tube.


- Is your tire worn out?

If you've been using these tires for a couple years they could just be worn out.  Worn tires will go flat all the time because the rubber on them wears away and becomes thin, allowing pokey stuff to pierce them more easily.  Check your tread wear (and many tires have wear indicators that you can check for.)  If you like to skid your tires, that will wear them very quickly.  If you are using soft mountain bike or cyclocross tires on the road, they will wear very quickly.



You should not get flats very often on your bike (I can usually go 10,000 km on a new set of tires without flats).  Defective tubes do happen, but not all that often in my experience.  Puncture resistant tires work very well if the issue is just that you're running over sharp objects all the time.  Schwalbe Marathon Pluses or Continental Ride Tours are both pretty bombproof tires if you're looking to replace.

mudstache

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2018, 09:24:16 AM »
I was getting flats on my new (to me) bike, and took it to a bike shop to get advice.  They inflated the tires right there (my pump gauge was apparently lying to me), told me the tubes were fine, and sent me on my way.  Best 5 minutes ever - they didn't charge me anything, biking is faster and easier now, and I know where I will go the next time I need anything.  Could be worth a drop in to a local bike shop for a diagnosis!  Good luck!

Dave1442397

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2018, 11:34:57 AM »
https://www.bicycling.com/repair/a20004232/how-to-achieve-the-perfect-bike-tire-pressure/

You may be running the tires at too high a pressure. I ride a road bike, and the tires can take up to 120psi, but I run with 85 in the front and 90 in the back.

You may also want to look into tougher tires - https://www.londoncyclist.co.uk/best-puncture-proof-tyres/

fatcow240

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2018, 12:13:35 PM »
I have gone over a year without a flat with my current bike.  My last bike had cheaper tires and the tape that covers the spokes was too thin.


What kind of flat are you getting?

acepedro45

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2018, 01:41:01 PM »
Quote
What kind of flat are you getting?

I will investigate tonight for "snake bites" and try to post some pics. Thanks for all the helpful tips so far. If I had to guess at this point, I would choose improper installation on my part by not halfway inflating the new tubes. I also have a habit of lazily letting tire pressure drop over a couple weeks (or even a month?) until the bike feels too sluggish to ride, then inflating back to the top PSI. A number of people have suggested that running lower pressure might be contributing.

Yes, I have been feeling around diligently for sharp stuff on the interior of the tires every time I get a flat.

bognish

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2018, 01:49:27 PM »
If the tire holds pressure for a day or 2 after you put in a new tube, then it is unlikely that you damaged it during the change. If you are letting the pressure get low before refilling I would guess thats the cause. Fill them up once a week.

acepedro45

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2018, 09:05:04 AM »
I changed the tire last night took a look. Coupla observations:

1. The hole was a single pinprick dead center on the outside edge of the tube, consistent with running over something sharp. It was on the outside of the tube so inconsistent with the underinflated snake bite theory or the poking spoke theory.

Quote
when you hit a big bump the tire will flex too much, the rim will hit the ground, and it will put two cuts in your tube (usually looks like a snake bite). 

Quote
The spokes go through a hole in the rim...The edges of these holes are sharp and will puncture a tire.when it's inflated.

2. Removed by a foot or so from the hole, there was a bunched part of the tube. So maybe with time that would have developed into the rubbing flat that PoutineLover mentioned.

Quote
By not partially inflating the tube, part of it could be wedged in wrong and wearing out too fast.

This is an idiot question, but the tube diameter should be the same as my bike tire diameter, right? I have 26" tires and I've been putting on 26" tubes, but I always seem to have a bunch at the end that I have to stuff in somehow. Partially inflating last night before installation seemed to help a little.

GuitarStv

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2018, 09:25:10 AM »
How thick is the tire?  It's possible that you've worn it down enough that there are a couple thin spots that allow stuff to poke through.

bognish

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2018, 09:31:33 AM »
Partial inflating the tube will help even out the bunching in the tube when you are replacing it.

If you keep getting flats you can get tire liners pretty cheap (maybe $10). Its a strip you put between the tube and tire as an extra barrier to punctures. It can be a bit of a fiddle to get them to stay in the right place until the tire is inflated, but not too bad and worth it if you avoid 1 flat.

More expensive is to place the tires with puncture resistant tires. These will probably be about $40 per tire. Less fiddle than tire liners and should greatly reduce the flats.

Cheap tubes really shouldn't matter too much.

sol

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2018, 10:08:31 AM »
This is an idiot question, but the tube diameter should be the same as my bike tire diameter, right? I have 26" tires and I've been putting on 26" tubes

Yes, you're doing it correctly. 

Try the new tube, installed while partially inflated, and report back.  If you're still getting flats, I'd suggest springing for the puncture proof tires.  Some routes and/or usage profiles just demand the protection they provide.

frugaliknowit

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2018, 01:28:07 PM »
This is an idiot question, but the tube diameter should be the same as my bike tire diameter, right? I have 26" tires and I've been putting on 26" tubes

Yes, you're doing it correctly. 

Try the new tube, installed while partially inflated, and report back.  If you're still getting flats, I'd suggest springing for the puncture proof tires.  Some routes and/or usage profiles just demand the protection they provide.

Most bikes are "700 MM"~26 inches (technically 27.56").  If the tube size is wrong, you WILL be prone to the tube failing.

Tube sizes are generally quoted as "700 X 21-24" which means 700 diameter, and width is ok for 21 to 24 MM  range (a 3 mm range is like nothing...).  Since you have a hybrid, it might be something like "700 X 32" or something like that (what does your tire say?).

It's either:

You need puncture resistant tires (I use Specialized Amardillo Elite) because you've got too much glass and rough terrain and/or

You have a spoke poking through the rim tape and/or

You are installing the tube such that it is getting snagged somehow and creating strees and/or

Your tires are so worn that they offer no or minimal resistance to hazards.

I hope that helps!



sol

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2018, 01:36:37 PM »
Most bikes are "700 MM"~26 inches (technically 27.56"). 

Let's not confuse the issue.  26" is a standard tire size for hybrids.  It will say 26" on the tire, and it takes a 26" tube that is widely available at places like walmart.

700s are a whole different wheel, and presumably not what OP has.  They take tubes labelled 700.

GuitarStv

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2018, 01:44:32 PM »
Oddly enough, a 700C wheel is only 622 mm in diameter and "26 inch" mountain bike rims usually have a diameter of 22 inches, or 559 mm.  It's a really weird and counter-intuitive naming system.

Tubes expand a whole bunch.  If the tube says MTB on it and you're using an MTB wheel, you'll be fine.  I've used 700x25 mm road tubes with 700x32 mm road tires with no problem.  Heck, my son's 16x2.25 inch bike tire currently sports a 700x32 tube with a knot tied in the end to make is small enough to mount because I was lazy about going down to the store to buy the right tube when he got a flat.

If you put a tube that's too small in a tire, it will lose air faster than the right size tube so you might have to top up more often.  I don't believe that tube thickness does much to prevent punctures though.  That's what the tire is for.

freeat57

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2018, 11:20:47 AM »
Hello acepedro45!  You did not say where you live.  When I moved to west Texas a few years ago, I learned about burr grass the hard way.  I go so many flat tires on my bike there.  That stuff is as sharp as a hypodermic needle and will easily puncture a bike tire.  You could never ride across a grassy area there (or go barefoot in the grass).  Also, people would throw the burrs out into the street as they mowed, so it was everywhere.  If you are out west, it could be something like that.

GuitarStv

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2018, 11:24:49 AM »
Hello acepedro45!  You did not say where you live.  When I moved to west Texas a few years ago, I learned about burr grass the hard way.  I go so many flat tires on my bike there.  That stuff is as sharp as a hypodermic needle and will easily puncture a bike tire.  You could never ride across a grassy area there (or go barefoot in the grass).  Also, people would throw the burrs out into the street as they mowed, so it was everywhere.  If you are out west, it could be something like that.

If this is the case, I'd go with one of those slime filled tubes so that it'll puncture and then seal itself as you ride.

freeat57

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2018, 11:27:42 AM »
Hello acepedro45!  You did not say where you live.  When I moved to west Texas a few years ago, I learned about burr grass the hard way.  I go so many flat tires on my bike there.  That stuff is as sharp as a hypodermic needle and will easily puncture a bike tire.  You could never ride across a grassy area there (or go barefoot in the grass).  Also, people would throw the burrs out into the street as they mowed, so it was everywhere.  If you are out west, it could be something like that.

If this is the case, I'd go with one of those slime filled tubes so that it'll puncture and then seal itself as you ride.

My solution was to move away from that God-forsaken barren wilderness! 

SimpleCycle

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2018, 11:37:09 AM »
I used to live in Tucson and rode A LOT and I'd say I averaged a flat per 100-200 miles on my road bike (about once a week given how much I rode), almost all due to goat head thorns or the occasional snake bite from hitting an obstacle wrong.  That was "normal" given the road conditions, and as a result I am an expert tire changer and patcher.

I got three flats in a row on my hybrid, and that was not normal and it turned out to be that a spoke nipple poked through the rim tape and was repeatedly flatting the tube.  Even though I've changed a zillion flat tires, I didn't notice until I looked extra hard for the cause.

If it's not something like rim tape or underinflated tires, I would just slime the tires and call it a day.  I would also buy a proper pump with gauge and pump up your tires at least once a week.

bognish

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2018, 11:43:49 AM »
Slime is going to slow the leak to a slow bleed, but won't patch the hole. It will go flat overnight and you will have to refill it in the morning. Repeat for each ride. If you are going on a long ride you might want to bring a pump. Slime is cheap, but can be messy.  use this on my kids bikes, since they seem to seek out fields of goatheads. They'll get 20 punctures on 1 ride and the wheel will be bubbling green slime when we get home. If there were puncture proof kids tires I would probably upgrade them to those, but they don't ride everyday and they aren't doing 20 miles so went with slime and a good floor tire pump.

acepedro45

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2018, 09:36:10 AM »
ARGH! ANOTHER FLAT LAST NIGHT....just a few days after I changed the rear tire properly (semi inflating the tube, putting it in place with extra attention to no kinks) I got another flat in the same tire. 

I haven't pulled the bike apart yet, but I promised some pics of the tire. This one shows the worst of the sidewall damage on the front tire. The rear tire doesn't have this kind of damage.

Quote
Most bikes are "700 MM"~26 inches (technically 27.56").  If the tube size is wrong, you WILL be prone to the tube failing.

Tube sizes are generally quoted as "700 X 21-24" which means 700 diameter, and width is ok for 21 to 24 MM  range (a 3 mm range is like nothing...).  Since you have a hybrid, it might be something like "700 X 32" or something like that (what does your tire say?).

Funny enough, both my tire sidewall and the tubes I am purchasing are quoted in inches, not MM. I haven't seen any metric measurements, so I don't think it's a case of garbling the conversion.


« Last Edit: August 25, 2018, 09:42:02 AM by acepedro45 »

acepedro45

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2018, 09:37:18 AM »
Here's a close up of the remaining tread. I thought that might be helpful to gauge the thickness.

I am going to pull apart the bike again today. I will try for more pics, including the damage to the tube.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2018, 09:42:37 AM by acepedro45 »

acepedro45

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2018, 10:50:36 AM »
Ok I am fresh from disassembling and diagnosing this latest flat. Inspection showed a pinprick on the outside edge of the tube. Looking over the corresponding part of the tire, I found a small piece of sharp glass and removed it. Could this have caused the previous flat too but escaped my initial fix a few days prior? Possible, not sure.

But the larger question about flat frequency remains. I know my multiple posts already smack a bit of Mr. Orange, but I am going to list all my original theories, plus those suggested by commentators and evaluate each.

A. This is normal incidence - I should expect flat tires every so often with this much bike use. No, other commentators view this as wildly off base. GuitarStv goes 10,000 km in between flats.

B. Maybe I'm changing my tubes improperly - I'm shamefully ignorant on bike maintenance. Is there a wrong way to change a tire? I've watched a few videos and asked questions while the bike shop changed my tires in the past. My last change I didn't even use the two plastic tire levers to get the tire on and off. I just put the tube in place, wrestled the tire on, and then filled up at the gas station. That lasted only a month. Some recommend partially inflating the tube as you put it in place but I didn't do this. I've never patched a tube - I just replace. There were a few regrettable incidents in the past, but I'm cleaning up my act here and preinflating before I install the new tube.

C. Maybe I'm using cheapo Walmart tubes that don't hold up - In fact I am! Do you think these aren't good enough for normal commuting? I'm using $4 Duro tubes...but I have at least verified they are the correct diameter and width for my bike. Limited reviews online but maybe I'm going too cheap here.
People in this board don't seem to have problems with cheap tubes.

D. Maybe I'm riding over glass or sharp objects too much. One flat I attribute to a sharp stone that was unfortunately placed in my path, all the others I really don't know the cause. Ok, now we're getting warmer. But still, my commute is on asphalt and not discarded hypodermic syringes. There are occasional road hazards like glasss that I try to steer around, but I don't think I should be getting flats with this kind of frequency....right?

E. Maybe my tires themselves are bad/not resistant enough to puncture. I replaced them a year or so back with new but cheap tires. I think I paid $50 for the pair at a bike shop (but a place I trust) and installed myself. This is another possibility. I showed pictures of my worn front tire where the sidewall is damaged (probably from walking home with a flat, ironically). The rear tire doesn't show this kind of damage. Maybe the solution is gatorskins or whatever.

F. A spoke could be poking through and causing flats (suggested by GuitarStv, SimpleCycle and fatcow240). The rim tape seems to be in place. It feels smooth. The puncture holes I'm finding are on the outer perimeter of the tube, not the inner.

G. Sharp debris was still lodged in the tire (suggested by a good number of commentators). Yes, this is a strong possibility for the last two flats. However, it doesn't explain getting flats spaced out every month or so on both tires (unless there is some debris in both tires).

H. The tires are not inflated properly or the tubes are not sized correctly (suggested by RWD, sol, Dave1442397, bognish, frugaliknowit). Sizing wise I'm definitely ok. It's a 26" x 1.5" tire with a range of 60-90 psi. The tube packaging lists 26 x 1.25 - 1.75. The tube itself says 26 x 1.25.

Regarding pressure, there are times I could be running below 60 since I usually inflate to 70 and then let it go, sometimes up to a month. But if it's feeling sluggish I usually reinflate.


I. There could be burrs or other unique road hazards in my locale that cause trouble. (freeat57 suggestion)
I live in Connecticut and can't think of anything, aside from bumps in the asphalt and the occasional bit of sharp stuff on the road, that could be causing these flats. Certainly nothing unique to my location. 



GuitarStv

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2018, 02:39:38 PM »
The tire tread in your pics doesn't look too bad.  it's possible that by running your tires below 60 is flattening them out more (especially the rear which carries most of your weight) which makes it more likely that debris will contact the sidewall.  It's also possible that the bit of glass was the problem.  I'd give 'em a ride for another couple weeks (and keep 'em properly inflated) and see what happens.  If you're still flatting regularly, go with a heavier duty puncture protection type tire.

jeninco

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2018, 03:59:51 PM »
I've made it hundreds (maybe as many as 1000) miles on my gatorskins before I got my first flat (last Thursday ... rode through a construction zone and wound up with what looked like a staple sticking into my rear tire.)  As I dislike changing tubes in the wild, I am a huge fan. They're definitely not cheap, but that's a lot of miles I've ridden instead of driving.

bognish

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2018, 02:54:21 PM »
You are getting more flats than normal. Get some puncture proof tires and a good floor pump to keep them filled. Performance Bikes & REI are running labor day sales now on bike stuff so you sould be able to save some $.

I have a promo code for Performance $20 off if you spend over $75 by 9/3. Let me know if you want me to send it to you (this is just a junk mail coupon. I don't get anything if you use it).

FLBiker

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2018, 02:58:15 PM »
If punctures are the issue, I've had good luck with Mr Tuffy Tire Liners.

robartsd

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2018, 03:09:21 PM »
The tire tread in your pics doesn't look too bad.  it's possible that by running your tires below 60 is flattening them out more (especially the rear which carries most of your weight) which makes it more likely that debris will contact the sidewall.  It's also possible that the bit of glass was the problem.  I'd give 'em a ride for another couple weeks (and keep 'em properly inflated) and see what happens.  If you're still flatting regularly, go with a heavier duty puncture protection type tire.
The tread looks OK, but the sidewall damage in the first picture is enough that my opinion is that it's time to replace the tire.

NoraLenderbee

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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #31 on: August 27, 2018, 04:49:50 PM »

The tread looks OK, but the sidewall damage in the first picture is enough that my opinion is that it's time to replace the tire.

Yes. The sidewall is shredding and is liable to fail explosively. That tire needs to be replaced.

OP, when you ride, do you look at the ground in front of you often? Do you notice patches of debris and little flashes of glass, and avoid them? Or do you plow forward over whatever is in your way? Get in the habit of making quick glances at the road and trying to notice debris. The less crap you ride over, the fewer flats you'll get. Combine that with maintaining proper pressure in your tires, and let us know if things improve.

Good luck!

bognish

  • Bristles
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  • Posts: 302
Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2018, 03:58:13 PM »
I just noticed that the Performance Bike promo code is unlimited. An extra $20 off purchases over $75.
Promo code 818
Its good through 9/3


Roger D

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
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Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #33 on: August 29, 2018, 04:35:46 AM »
We used to get lots of flat tires. Eventually we identified two things, which solved the problem completely.

1. We had not been fastidious enough about identifying the cause of the puncture. We patched the hole and reassembled everything. But if a fragment of metal or glass was still between the tube and tire somewhere, it would eventually make a new puncture.

2. It turned out that a shrub next to our driveway was shedding tiny sharp thorns onto the driveway. Looking at the thorns, you would never guess that they were strong enough or sharp enough to puncture a tire. But sure enough, when we got rid of the bush, the punctures stopped.

acepedro45

  • Stubble
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  • Posts: 243
Re: Flat Bike Tires
« Reply #34 on: August 29, 2018, 10:45:04 AM »
Quote
OP, when you ride, do you look at the ground in front of you often? Do you notice patches of debris and little flashes of glass, and avoid them? Or do you plow forward over whatever is in your way?

I'm not completely oblivious but I could use some improvement in watching out for debris.

Quote
Yes. The sidewall is shredding and is liable to fail explosively. That tire needs to be replaced.

I'm embarrassed to say the sidewall damage is minor compared to the original set of crappy tires I ran on for a few months when I first got the bike years ago. FYI, it's not on the rear tire, just the front.

Thanks for the coupon bognish.