Poll

Which car?

2016 Honda HRV
4 (40%)
2014 Mazda5
6 (60%)

Total Members Voted: 10

Author Topic: Picking a "new" car  (Read 1435 times)

charis

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Picking a "new" car
« on: September 19, 2018, 11:48:20 AM »
So I'm sure that there are many other vehicles that could be suggested, but let's just stick to these facts. 
« Last Edit: October 25, 2018, 12:19:49 PM by charis »

neo von retorch

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2018, 12:17:28 PM »
Is it a CRV or an HRV? The CRV is more comparable in size to the Mazda5. The HRV is smaller and likely inappropriate for your family. The poll shows CRV, but the title and thread show HRV.

RWD

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2018, 12:34:16 PM »
Where's the option for a 2012 Toyota Prius V?

charis

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2018, 12:36:12 PM »
Oops, the poll should say HRV, I'll try to fix it.

Is it a CRV or an HRV? The CRV is more comparable in size to the Mazda5. The HRV is smaller and likely inappropriate for your family. The poll shows CRV, but the title and thread show HRV.

I appreciate your comments on the HRV's size.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2018, 12:20:07 PM by charis »

charis

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2018, 01:02:05 PM »
Where's the option for a 2012 Toyota Prius V?

That's a comparable option, but I've only found a couple with high mileage or later models around here.  Storage capacity looks to be similar to the HRV and fuel economy is certainly good.

The Mazda will probably be more useful, but a low mileage, newer Honda seems like it could pay off in terms of reliability and cost.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 01:25:29 PM by jezebel »

Ecky

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2018, 07:52:10 PM »
The HRV is hardly bigger inside than a Fit, it just looks a lot bigger due to bulbous bodywork and huge wheels - cargo space with the seats down is 53 cubic feet in the Fit and just 56 in the HR-V. Which is not to say it's small, just that a Fit may serve your needs just as well an get 25% better fuel economy doing so.

The HR-V is an extremely profitable vehicle. Small SUVs offer very little over compact hatches but cost a lot more, and most of that is profit margin because nobody wants cars anymore, and everyone needs an SUV.

middo

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2018, 08:00:17 PM »
My only suggestion is look at a lower price bracket.  Spending 10 to 15K on a car seems excessive to me.  I would be looking at no more than 5K.  Any money spent on a car is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible

use2betrix

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2018, 08:39:30 PM »
My only suggestion is look at a lower price bracket.  Spending 10 to 15K on a car seems excessive to me.  I would be looking at no more than 5K.  Any money spent on a car is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible

Really depends on the persons financial situation. Someone making $300k a year may want to avoid the additional, sooner maintenance of a $5k vehicle vs say a $15k vehicle. If the family makes $40k, it may be a different story.

For reference - I own both a 99 and 2017 vehicle. We love the 99, and paid $5k for it years ago and itís low miles, but it certainly needs more upkeep.

charis

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2018, 07:59:33 AM »
My only suggestion is look at a lower price bracket.  Spending 10 to 15K on a car seems excessive to me.  I would be looking at no more than 5K.  Any money spent on a car is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible

Really depends on the persons financial situation. Someone making $300k a year may want to avoid the additional, sooner maintenance of a $5k vehicle vs say a $15k vehicle. If the family makes $40k, it may be a different story.

For reference - I own both a 99 and 2017 vehicle. We love the 99, and paid $5k for it years ago and itís low miles, but it certainly needs more upkeep.
We are leaning toward the cheaper car, so I'm not really doubting the decision.  Even if we don't make 300K per year.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2018, 12:20:55 PM by charis »

middo

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2018, 04:55:42 PM »
My only suggestion is look at a lower price bracket.  Spending 10 to 15K on a car seems excessive to me.  I would be looking at no more than 5K.  Any money spent on a car is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible

Really depends on the persons financial situation. Someone making $300k a year may want to avoid the additional, sooner maintenance of a $5k vehicle vs say a $15k vehicle. If the family makes $40k, it may be a different story.

For reference - I own both a 99 and 2017 vehicle. We love the 99, and paid $5k for it years ago and itís low miles, but it certainly needs more upkeep.

We currently have an 07 and an 09 (keeping) sedans.  The 07 has been a money pit for years, we'd be lucky to get 2K in a private sale and it probably needs more than 2K worth of additional work.  We spent 3K rebuilding the 09's transmission two years ago and it has 100K+ miles.  We need a larger, reliable vehicle for long car trips with our kids and dog.  We work full time and DIY a lot of stuff, but not car repairs.  We are leaning toward the cheaper car, so I'm not really doubting the decision to lay out probably 9K.  Even if we don't make 300K per year ;)

I understand these issues, but my point still remains.  Money spent on any vehicle is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible.

If you are having to rebuild transmissions after 100K+ miles then you probably need to do better research before you buy the next car.  I have had one car do 580K+ kms without any major repairs, and the only servicing was oil change, air filter and spark plugs every 50,000 kms.  That car stopped running because my son drove it into another car. :(  We bought a replacement, same model, 2007 for $2200 with 250,000 kms on the clock.  It also hasn't cost us a cent yet.

We also recently bought a 2001 car with 260,000 kms on the clock for $3000, as the other car was handed onto my daughter.  Again, no issues that stop it from running.  The roof lining was falling down, so I pulled it out.  We may spend $150 getting it replaced, or may not.  It just isn't that important to us.

Maintenance on a $15,000 car, if you follow service schedules to try to maintain the value of your car, and you get it done by the "shop" will be significant.  Older cars are often cheaper to service and maintain than newer ones, provided you don't have a major failure.  The "newer is cheaper" mantra doesn't really add up from what I have seen and heard. 

Do the homework.  Check the reliability of cars you are interested in.  Don't assume newer is cheaper to maintain.

charis

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2018, 05:23:50 PM »
My only suggestion is look at a lower price bracket.  Spending 10 to 15K on a car seems excessive to me.  I would be looking at no more than 5K.  Any money spent on a car is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible

Really depends on the persons financial situation. Someone making $300k a year may want to avoid the additional, sooner maintenance of a $5k vehicle vs say a $15k vehicle. If the family makes $40k, it may be a different story.

For reference - I own both a 99 and 2017 vehicle. We love the 99, and paid $5k for it years ago and itís low miles, but it certainly needs more upkeep.

I understand these issues, but my point still remains.  Money spent on any vehicle is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible.

If you are having to rebuild transmissions after 100K+ miles then you probably need to do better research before you buy the next car.  I have had one car do 580K+ kms without any major repairs, and the only servicing was oil change, air filter and spark plugs every 50,000 kms.  That car stopped running because my son drove it into another car. :(  We bought a replacement, same model, 2007 for $2200 with 250,000 kms on the clock.  It also hasn't cost us a cent yet.

We also recently bought a 2001 car with 260,000 kms on the clock for $3000, as the other car was handed onto my daughter.  Again, no issues that stop it from running.  The roof lining was falling down, so I pulled it out.  We may spend $150 getting it replaced, or may not.  It just isn't that important to us.

Maintenance on a $15,000 car, if you follow service schedules to try to maintain the value of your car, and you get it done by the "shop" will be significant.  Older cars are often cheaper to service and maintain than newer ones, provided you don't have a major failure.  The "newer is cheaper" mantra doesn't really add up from what I have seen and heard. 

Do the homework.  Check the reliability of cars you are interested in.  Don't assume newer is cheaper to maintain.

 I've done many hours of research, as I do with any large purchase. Both options are reliable. I'm glad your cars have served you well. I try not make assumptions about anything, including internet strangers. You should do the same.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2018, 12:21:47 PM by charis »

middo

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2018, 06:09:39 PM »
My only suggestion is look at a lower price bracket.  Spending 10 to 15K on a car seems excessive to me.  I would be looking at no more than 5K.  Any money spent on a car is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible

Really depends on the persons financial situation. Someone making $300k a year may want to avoid the additional, sooner maintenance of a $5k vehicle vs say a $15k vehicle. If the family makes $40k, it may be a different story.

For reference - I own both a 99 and 2017 vehicle. We love the 99, and paid $5k for it years ago and itís low miles, but it certainly needs more upkeep.

We currently have an 07 and an 09 (keeping) sedans.  The 07 has been a money pit for years, we'd be lucky to get 2K in a private sale and it probably needs more than 2K worth of additional work.  We spent 3K rebuilding the 09's transmission two years ago and it has 100K+ miles.  We need a larger, reliable vehicle for long car trips with our kids and dog.  We work full time and DIY a lot of stuff, but not car repairs.  We are leaning toward the cheaper car, so I'm not really doubting the decision to lay out probably 9K.  Even if we don't make 300K per year ;)

I understand these issues, but my point still remains.  Money spent on any vehicle is money down the drain, so minimise it as much as possible.

If you are having to rebuild transmissions after 100K+ miles then you probably need to do better research before you buy the next car.  I have had one car do 580K+ kms without any major repairs, and the only servicing was oil change, air filter and spark plugs every 50,000 kms.  That car stopped running because my son drove it into another car. :(  We bought a replacement, same model, 2007 for $2200 with 250,000 kms on the clock.  It also hasn't cost us a cent yet.

We also recently bought a 2001 car with 260,000 kms on the clock for $3000, as the other car was handed onto my daughter.  Again, no issues that stop it from running.  The roof lining was falling down, so I pulled it out.  We may spend $150 getting it replaced, or may not.  It just isn't that important to us.

Maintenance on a $15,000 car, if you follow service schedules to try to maintain the value of your car, and you get it done by the "shop" will be significant.  Older cars are often cheaper to service and maintain than newer ones, provided you don't have a major failure.  The "newer is cheaper" mantra doesn't really add up from what I have seen and heard. 

Do the homework.  Check the reliability of cars you are interested in.  Don't assume newer is cheaper to maintain.

The transmission issue was a corolla. I've done many hours of research, as I do with any large purchase. Both options are reliable. I'm glad your cars have served you well. I try not make assumptions about anything, including internet strangers. You should do the same.

No assumptions, just advice.   
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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car

A corolla with a broken transmission is unusual, so you were probably just unlucky.

middo

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Re: Family needs help picking a "new" car
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2018, 07:40:57 PM »
Not reaching here - your statements directly imply an assumption that I didn't do my homework, didn't check the reliability of the vehicles, and just assumed things about them without doing either. Nothing in my posts suggest that.

And a vehicle with a broken transmission after 100K miles suggests you didn't do your homework.  I was trying to give advice rather than start a fight.  My suggestions remain valid.