Author Topic: Expensive things you've tried that just aren't worth it (add to the list!)  (Read 36694 times)

katesilvergirl

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Every time I take something to the dry cleaner I regret it. Even my wedding dress got ruined there. They didn't try very hard to get out the stain on the silk table runner, and I've never ruined a "Dry Clean Only" piece of clothing by putting it in the washing machine. I buy 90% of my clothes at the thrift store and wash every single one in the washing machine (unless it's lace or something else delicate, then I hand wash). At least if I ruin something I won't have wasted $20 and only have myself to blame.

Vanguards and Lentils

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The evidence says expensive wine.

I'd bet a similar effect holds for coffee and beer, but I expect people to be much more defensive about those ones, since it's easy to think wine drinkers = the "others", snobs, etc. People are generally aware of the backstories and prices of their craft beers or fancy coffee, and in the wine experiments that information is what causes people to derive more enjoyment from the expensive wines, not the actual taste. I'll just wait for a nice double blind experiment to come out in the news.

Even if there is a marginal difference in taste, one has to ask if 10% better should cost 100% more (the answer is No).

Ceridwen

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I'll add another one to the alcohol list.  I once did a blind vodka taste test, and I chose the Smirnoff over Grey Goose!

For beauty products, Clinique moisturizer is my one splurge (totally worth it for me), and I recently got a free "chubby stick" ($29 tinted lip balm) with purchase.  I was excited, because I'd heard great things.  It sucks.  I was constantly reapplying it.  Cover Girl $6 version is way better.

Trudie

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Expensive wine.  Expensive sunglasses (I always lose them.)

The_Pretender

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$200 Espresso machine... We have used it far fewer times then the regular stove top espresso pot. 

I have purchased 4 pairs of $150-$180 dress shoes for work since 2004.  I figure, since I wear these shoes ~240 days in the year, a nice pair that can last for several years and still provide good support, is worth it.

Brokenreign

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A nice suit. I spent $1g to "buy it for life." Found that wearing a nice suit blows only marginally less than a shitty suit for the twice a year that I wear it. Now I am sweaty and poor instead of just sweaty.

+1000 to fancy restaurants. 3x the price for half the portion and 6x the pretentiousness. Super.

Also a nice car without hilarious visible damage. You just worry about it all the time and it's not funny when you back into steel posts. Shitboxes4life. My dream car is the one from planes trains and automobiles after it had been burned down.

Tris Prior

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Most of the organic produce available is shipped in from massive farms in Mexico or Cali, so it's not like it is even fresher than the conventional produce or grown in an inherently more eco-friendly way.

I struggle with this catch-22 as well - buy locally and support small local farmers though it isn't organic, or buy organic that's traveled thousands of miles to get to me? Only solution I've found is to grow my own when I can, but as an apartment dweller I certainly can't grow *everything*.

I'll add mascara to the list. I've tried some of the expensive fancy brands but continue to prefer the cheap drugstore stuff.

Every time I take something to the dry cleaner I regret it. Even my wedding dress got ruined there.

Oh god, the wedding dress cleaning/boxing thing.... in my experience this was a total scam. I decided I wanted to sell my dress after my divorce, and I took it out of the box, only to find that it had been boxed up dirty! There was still mud all over the hem and train (it had rained on my wedding day). Which I was able to remove myself quickly with cold water and a little Oxiclean. I think I was charged something like $85 for "dress cleaning and preservation."

Slee_stack

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Darn, I should be having an easy time with this, but I'm struggling to come up with something.  We really have reigned in spending extra on stuff we don't really appreciate over the years.

We've bought a few expensive cheeses we didn't like, but we have had others we do enjoy.  Same with beer/wine/any food really. 

Trying new things is an acceptable expense to us (within reason).

DagobertDuck

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Car ownership.

mozar

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I started buying local eggs (from my state) when the farmers market started at 5 each. Didn't taste any better, and for some reason, only had a shelf life of a few days. Last time I went they had run out and I wasn't sad. I can get eggs that are organic and from one state over, taste better, last longer, and are 3.58

justajane

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The evidence says expensive wine.

I'd bet a similar effect holds for coffee and beer, but I expect people to be much more defensive about those ones, since it's easy to think wine drinkers = the "others", snobs, etc.

Funny, I came to the conclusion that, since I like very light beer, I was probably wasting my money paying slightly more for Stella Artois when I went out and just embraced Bud Lite and other cheap beers. I'm thinking of doing a blind taste test to see if I'm right. I'm not sure I could tell that much of a difference. To save face around beer snobs I still might order the Stella over the other, but it's totally stupid.

**Note I know neither of these are fancy beers. My husband sometimes buys these $10 a glass microbrews that IMO taste like ass. Sour beer = disgusting.

engineermom21

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Similar to what most others said: expensive cars, designer clothes/bags, etc.

Honestly, I am also starting to really get sick of buying organic foods. The selection is usually much more limited, and the prices are often double that of conventional. I can't taste or see any difference, and the research on the stuff is inconclusive/inconsistent at best. Most of the organic produce available is shipped in from massive farms in Mexico or Cali, so it's not like it is even fresher than the conventional produce or grown in an inherently more eco-friendly way. Really the only thing that keeps me buying some organic items is vague hippie paranoia, and a bad case of the "what ifs".

I second the organic thing.  The more I read about it, the less convinced I am that it's actually worth the extra cost to buy organic.  Organic pesticides aren't really any "safer" than conventional pesticides, organic produce doesn't last nearly as long as conventional, and the nutritional content isn't any higher.  Part of thinks that buying everything organic is going to the fad of our generation, kind of like "fat free" was in the 80s and 90s.  But I also have that "what if" syndrome, especially when it comes to food for my kids. 

little_brown_dog

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Similar to what most others said: expensive cars, designer clothes/bags, etc.

Honestly, I am also starting to really get sick of buying organic foods. The selection is usually much more limited, and the prices are often double that of conventional. I can't taste or see any difference, and the research on the stuff is inconclusive/inconsistent at best. Most of the organic produce available is shipped in from massive farms in Mexico or Cali, so it's not like it is even fresher than the conventional produce or grown in an inherently more eco-friendly way. Really the only thing that keeps me buying some organic items is vague hippie paranoia, and a bad case of the "what ifs".

I second the organic thing.  The more I read about it, the less convinced I am that it's actually worth the extra cost to buy organic.  Organic pesticides aren't really any "safer" than conventional pesticides, organic produce doesn't last nearly as long as conventional, and the nutritional content isn't any higher.  Part of thinks that buying everything organic is going to the fad of our generation, kind of like "fat free" was in the 80s and 90s.  But I also have that "what if" syndrome, especially when it comes to food for my kids.

Glad to see I'm not the only one who is weirdly conflicted about this.

Right now I buy organic if it is a "dirty dozen" food, otherwise I go conventional. It's amazing, my grocery bill is a solid 20 to 30% less when I'm buying mostly conventional produce. On days where more organics fill the cart, there is always a bit of sticker shock at the checkout. I figure a middle ground approach is best. That way I'm not completely throwing money away for no reason, but if there is merit to organics, then at least I'm doing something to mitigate risk. With local, I don't worry either way. I want to support my regional farmers. I'm more worried about small family farms completely dying off than obsessing about an organic label.

Kitsune

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Similar to what most others said: expensive cars, designer clothes/bags, etc.

Honestly, I am also starting to really get sick of buying organic foods. The selection is usually much more limited, and the prices are often double that of conventional. I can't taste or see any difference, and the research on the stuff is inconclusive/inconsistent at best. Most of the organic produce available is shipped in from massive farms in Mexico or Cali, so it's not like it is even fresher than the conventional produce or grown in an inherently more eco-friendly way. Really the only thing that keeps me buying some organic items is vague hippie paranoia, and a bad case of the "what ifs".

I second the organic thing.  The more I read about it, the less convinced I am that it's actually worth the extra cost to buy organic.  Organic pesticides aren't really any "safer" than conventional pesticides, organic produce doesn't last nearly as long as conventional, and the nutritional content isn't any higher.  Part of thinks that buying everything organic is going to the fad of our generation, kind of like "fat free" was in the 80s and 90s.  But I also have that "what if" syndrome, especially when it comes to food for my kids.

Glad to see I'm not the only one who is weirdly conflicted about this.

Right now I buy organic if it is a "dirty dozen" food, otherwise I go conventional. It's amazing, my grocery bill is a solid 20 to 30% less when I'm buying mostly conventional produce. On days where more organics fill the cart, there is always a bit of sticker shock at the checkout. I figure a middle ground approach is best. That way I'm not completely throwing money away for no reason, but if there is merit to organics, then at least I'm doing something to mitigate risk. With local, I don't worry either way. I want to support my regional farmers. I'm more worried about small family farms completely dying off than obsessing about an organic label.

This. Health-wise, I'm unconvinced, but I do think that putting humanity's food supply into the hands of Monsanto is stupid, at best.

If you have access to local farms (like, roadside stand or you-pick, not farmers market where half the stuff is imported), organic doesn't mean much - visit the farm, see how the animals are treated. Most small farms don't have certification because the process is really expensive, but if you want to support local farmers, buy well-raised meat and in-season vegetables, and ensure that at least some of the local food supply remains in existence, that's the way to go.



KMMK

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Ugh, restaurants. So rare for that to work out well. I need to stick to buying gluten free baking if I want to buy a treat. Meals rarely work out.

Cannot Wait!

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Husbands.   :\

lifejoy

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Husbands.   :\

I like your sense of humour!!!

Metric Mouse

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Husbands.   :\

I like your sense of humour!!!

I'd say they're probably not joking. Never had one of my own, but I totally don't understand the appeal...

Mikila

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1. Pedicures
2. Personal lube.  Coconut or olive oil works well.
3.Nearly new cars.
4.$40 haircuts.  Now I go to Supercuts, or GreatCuts, or wherever I can get my hair cut for less than $16. (female)
5.Boys haircuts. Clippers at home are better and far, far cheeaper.
6. Pricey guitars.  The $100 Kona does 80% of what the pricey ones do, and its deficiencies are mostly in the pickup.
7.Expensive Hotels.  I am just as happy at Super 8.  I vacation to see the sites, not lounge in my hotel.  I just need a bed or safe place to set up  my airbed if theirs is really that uncomfortable.

To the poster above, kids are not "Expensive things you've tried that just aren't worth it."  They are human beings.  In this country, you can't buy them, unless you are speaking of adoption, which I doubt...

cacaoheart

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Coconut/olive oil works fine with non-latex condoms. Being a healthcare worker I try to minimize my exposure to latex anyhow since allergies can occur from cumulative exposure.

back on track ...

I gave up on $20 per pound locally roasted coffee beans when I realized $5 per 12 ounce (~$6.70 per pound) Trader Joes beans were more than good enough for my tastes, especially if not having it black. I tried roasting my own from Sweet Maria's but unless/until roasting becomes a personal passion, Trader Joes is a similar price for much less effort and no extra space taken up by roasting equipment. My wife is even cheaper by sticking with loose leaf tea rather than coffee. A pound of earl grey or white tea can be <$20 on amazon and last for months. No grinder/roaster needed.

I buy organic if I want to eat the peal of a citrus fruit, otherwise standard non-organic all the way.


Torran

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I second Clinique's chubby stick - got a freebie (I guess they're trying to entice us into buying them regularly) and it really sucks.

On that note, all expensive make-up - I try out freebies whenever I can, just to see if they really are any better, and I've never found one that stood out as being remarkable in any way.

On a tv programme years ago I watched a successful business man describe one of his career regrets as being that he didn't get into cosmetics, because it's just a licence to print money. Seems accurate.

I've stayed in a 5 star hotel, once, but to be honest it was worth every bit. Christmas time, snowing outside, huge bath, heating on, fluffy carpets, basket of snacks (I love snacks), espresso machine - I was basically in heaven. It was worth it.

Torran

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I second Clinique's chubby stick - got a freebie (I guess they're trying to entice us into buying them regularly) and it really sucks.

On that note, all expensive make-up - I try out freebies whenever I can, just to see if they really are any better, and I've never found one that stood out as being remarkable in any way.

On a tv programme years ago I watched a successful business man describe one of his career regrets as being that he didn't get into cosmetics, because it's just a licence to print money. Seems accurate.

I've stayed in a 5 star hotel, once, but to be honest it was worth every bit. Christmas time, snowing outside, huge bath, heating on, fluffy carpets, basket of snacks (I love snacks), espresso machine - I was basically in heaven. It was worth it.

Just realised I said 'it was worth it' twice which makes it sound like I'm protesting a bit too much. But seriously you guys IT WAS WORTH IT *mad eye twitch*

Tyson

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Gym membership.  I find riding my bike and doing old school pushups/pullups so much better - it wastes less $$ and saves time.  Especially biking since I can use it to run errands. 

Kitsune

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On that note, all expensive make-up - I try out freebies whenever I can, just to see if they really are any better, and I've never found one that stood out as being remarkable in any way.

I will swear by the Chanel face powder I use (80$, lasts 2 years, ONLY thing I've ever used that hasn't made my face break out) and Bobbi Brown lipstick (33$, but the colour stays on for 6 hours AND it doesn't make my lips crack and bleed). If you have sensitive skin, I will strongly recommend trying the product at Sephora prior to buying - I can tell if foundation is going to make my face break out within 20 minutes, and it's nice to be able to wash it off and NOT have wasted 40+$ on buying it. Or lipsticks - Nars, MAC, Make-up Forever, all the brands people recommend? Cracking, bleeding lips, and they ain't cheap. For the rest? Drugstore all the way, doesn't seem to make a difference to anything other than my budget.


rockstache

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Husbands.   :\

I like your sense of humour!!!

I'd say they're probably not joking. Never had one of my own, but I totally don't understand the appeal...

Like anything, it probably depends on the version. I've been really happy with mine.

With This Herring

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When I was looking at switching from Twinings, I tried the loose leaf Irish Breakfast sold at my parents' local co-op.  It was >$20/lb (almost the same unit price as Twinings in my area), and just a disappointingly grassy taste.  It is almost twice as much as the best prices I later found in stores and online.  At least I just got a four-ounce sample.  Now I'm drinking Barry's in bags (bought on a great sale making it the cheapest Irish Breakfast tea per pound I've seen anywhere), and it is perfect.

*snip*
My wife is even cheaper by sticking with loose leaf tea rather than coffee. A pound of earl grey or white tea can be <$20 on amazon and last for months. No grinder/roaster needed.
*snip*

If your wife has an interest, there may be yet cheaper sources of loose tea for her.  I did an extensive survey of Irish Breakfast online tea prices a couple months ago because I really wanted the best deal.  Some sites with good prices (for Irish Breakfast when I was looking) were as follows:
English Tea Store (link is to Earl Grey) (the prices listed on the size drop-down appear to be broken, so don't rely on a price until that size is actually selected) - it looks like once you add shipping, you can get 5 lbs of Earl Grey for less than $10/lb (also, if you move to close the window, it usually pops up with a 10% off code)
San Francisco Herb Company
Monterey Bay Spice Company

chesebert

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First class. Decent food and booze but still jet lagged because I can't sleep no matter where I am on the plane. YMMV
« Last Edit: June 30, 2016, 01:58:46 PM by chesebert »

dougules

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One thing that did not live up to my expectations (based on many unsolicited reports by various people) is the superiority of train travel over bus travel from city-to-city (like Ottawa-Montreal or Ottawa-Toronto). So many people seem to rave about the train over the bus or over driving yourself but I haven't found the train to be the great upgrade that other people seem to think it is. If the price were the same, sure, I'd probably take the train, but it wouldn't require much of a price difference before I'd opt for the bus.

I think some of this has to do with the state of bus travel north of the Rio Grande as well as the reputation.  Anybody that's been to Latin America recently knows that bus travel can be really nice for not a whole lot of money. 

undercover

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+1 to not buying organic. It's just a trend that shouldn't exist. The people that insist on only organic generally are the same ones who are against all GMOs, MSG, etc. There's no basis other than the fear tactics placed in stores like Whole Foods. I agree with not eating junk full of preservatives, unhealthy oils and HFCS, but there's very little to zero scientific evidence supporting the fact that organic is better.

To me, it seems all or nothing. If you're going to buy organic only part of the time (when you feel like "splurging", or you are feeling particularly fearful), then what's the point? If at any point in time you're going to expose yourself to the "dangers" of non-organic, then why ever buy organic to begin with? Plus, how do you truly know what you're getting? I don't trust these corporations and stores to do everything properly, thus I just don't bother with it. It's all an exploitation in marketing as far as I'm concerned.

I love the look and feel of Whole Foods stores, and the like, but it also has such a pretentious feel to it at the same time. (Not everything in Whole Foods is overpriced, but a LOT of it is. Damn, even eating at their food bar requires a $200k+ salary).

dinkhelpneeded

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Not worth it (but ok to do once so the novelty wears off)

-Flying first class
-Expensive buffets (cant eat half that stuff). I do like the novelty of expensive restaurants (carefully picked out) on special occasions though!
-Expensive vacation things (para-sailing, jet ski etc)
-Expensive Art (This is a tough one for me, we bought a giant piece when we first bought a house) I could never sell it for nearly what I paid and  the marginal satisfaction I get from looking at it has gone down over time.

Not worth it. Period. Strong recommendation to never try it.
-Brand new maternity or baby clothes (currently living this!)
-German cars (always have maintenance issues, got rid of it in a year)
-Subscriptions to anything non essential (Angies list, upgrades on apps, cancelled after MMM)
-Gym subscriptions (buy your own equipment and pay as you go classes if you want them, cancelled after MMM)
-Fancy infused oils (DIY it if you like any)
-Kitchen gadgets that do just one thing (spiralizer, dehydrator, etc)
-Expensive Antique Furniture (I'm all for solid built moderately priced antiques, just not the super expensive hard to resell kinds)
-Expensive Mattress! (needs change over time, now I have a thin mattress. I hate the old $1000 mattress, which is now in a guest bedroom)
-Eating out regularly as an expensive habit (Neither good for health nor the wallet)


4alpacas

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On that note, all expensive make-up - I try out freebies whenever I can, just to see if they really are any better, and I've never found one that stood out as being remarkable in any way.

I will swear by the Chanel face powder I use (80$, lasts 2 years, ONLY thing I've ever used that hasn't made my face break out) and Bobbi Brown lipstick (33$, but the colour stays on for 6 hours AND it doesn't make my lips crack and bleed). If you have sensitive skin, I will strongly recommend trying the product at Sephora prior to buying - I can tell if foundation is going to make my face break out within 20 minutes, and it's nice to be able to wash it off and NOT have wasted 40+$ on buying it. Or lipsticks - Nars, MAC, Make-up Forever, all the brands people recommend? Cracking, bleeding lips, and they ain't cheap. For the rest? Drugstore all the way, doesn't seem to make a difference to anything other than my budget.
I'm obsessed with CoverGirl Lash Blast mascara.  I've tried a lot of expensive mascaras over the years--Benefit, YSL, Dior, etc.--but Lash Blast is so much better.  I usually spend about $5/tube, so I don't feel bad tossing it every 3 months.

Zoot

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Funny, I came to the conclusion that, since I like very light beer, I was probably wasting my money paying slightly more for Stella Artois when I went out and just embraced Bud Lite and other cheap beers. I'm thinking of doing a blind taste test to see if I'm right. I'm not sure I could tell that much of a difference. To save face around beer snobs I still might order the Stella over the other, but it's totally stupid.

**Note I know neither of these are fancy beers. My husband sometimes buys these $10 a glass microbrews that IMO taste like ass. Sour beer = disgusting.

The best beer is one you like.  :) 

Another way I like to think of it is based on a list of The World's Best Beers I saw online somewhere.  The five best beers in the world are:

1.  The beer you're drinking right now
2.  The beer you'll be drinking next
3.  The best beer you can remember
4.  The beer that's free
5.  The beer you make yourself

I've had all five of them, and I love them all.  :)

Yet another way I like to think of it comes from Amy Dacyczyn of Tightwad Gazette fame.  If Beer A costs twice as much as Beer B, is Beer A really twice as good as Beer B?  Or three times, or four times, or however many times, depending on the relative costs?

Now, I looooooove beer--I love the fancy beers aged in bourbon barrels that taste of vanilla, the ones from Belgium that taste of caramel or banana or orange, the pale ales and IPA's that taste of pine and citrus and grass.  For me, some of the fancy beers pass the Dacyczyn Test--Ommegang Rare Vos (for example) is multiple times as good as Bud Light to me, and I don't mind paying the premium for it.  But some beers do NOT--I can't stand porters and stouts, for instance, because I loathe the taste of coffee; I'd waaaaaaay rather drink a Bud Light than a Guinness, any day.  And there are times when a light lager like Bud Light is just the ticket--after a long day of yard work on a summer day, they are light and refreshing and perfect.  A heavy, thick, complex beer is not what I would want in that situation.

You'll almost certainly be able to tell the difference between Bud Light and Stella Artois in a blind taste test.  But the real question is which one you like--if Stella doesn't pass the Dacyczyn Test, drink your Bud Light with joy and tell your beer snob friends that they can go take a hike.  :)



Shinplaster

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One thing that did not live up to my expectations (based on many unsolicited reports by various people) is the superiority of train travel over bus travel from city-to-city (like Ottawa-Montreal or Ottawa-Toronto). So many people seem to rave about the train over the bus or over driving yourself but I haven't found the train to be the great upgrade that other people seem to think it is. If the price were the same, sure, I'd probably take the train, but it wouldn't require much of a price difference before I'd opt for the bus.

I think some of this has to do with the state of bus travel north of the Rio Grande as well as the reputation.  Anybody that's been to Latin America recently knows that bus travel can be really nice for not a whole lot of money.

Bus travel in Switzerland is fabulous too.  Locally, we'll take the bus if the times are convenient, the fares are cheaper than train, and we don't care about ambience.

But, for bus vs. train in Canada, note that Via offers business class fares for half price or less if you book early.  Sometimes we have travelled business for less than economy fare.  Business out of Toronto (and probably most big cities) means you get to hang out and drink all the coffee, tea, juices, etc. you want in your private space before you board, then have a full meal (admittedly not all that great, but still...), dessert, beer, wine, cognac, more coffee, tea and soft drinks.  All while sitting in lovely new trains, with tables separating the seats for doubles, and a row of single seats on one side of the car for solo travellers.  I'll take that over rubbing thighs with a stranger on a bus any day!

bryan995

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A house in a HCOL area :)

johndoe

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Re: Expensive things that just aren't worth it (add to the list!)
« Reply #84 on: June 30, 2016, 04:14:57 PM »
Expensive guitars. It turns out that my white Les Paul Custom (~$4,000) wasn't really so much of an advance on the Korean-made $350 guitar-store-used-rack find.

Still. I only lost 500 bucks when I sold it. (Where was that 'biggest financial blunders' thread again? ... cough)

Shit. You beat me to it.

I must respectfully disagree...to a point.  A Google search yielded this; I suppose it applies to most things:

Lanthiriel

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My recent trip to Vegas... ugh.

My engagement ring. I stupidly had my wedding ring soldered to it too. I haven't worn the set in at least 5 years. It's pave set and gets absolutely filthy, plus I don't want to have to remember to take it off before I go hiking or to the dog park or... It makes me wish I'd have bought a solitaire (yes, we bought my ring together) since I might actually wear it. I buy a $50 to $100 ring every couple of years and exchange it out for a new one when it gets too beat up. I could do this for the rest of my life and probably not spend what I did on the first ring.

I also totally agree on haircuts. I am too much of a pansy to cut my own, but now I get it cut about every three months when I get a $6.99 Great Clips coupon in the mail.

SoccerLounge

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Re: Expensive things that just aren't worth it (add to the list!)
« Reply #86 on: June 30, 2016, 04:56:08 PM »
[I must respectfully disagree...to a point.  A Google search yielded this; I suppose it applies to most things:

I agree with that excellent plot. The thing is, the taper starts at a much lower level of price nowadays than many people think - and not just in guitars, either. (Look how good cars are now that only cost $10,000 or less new!)

markbike528CBX

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lobster Thermidor -- company paid so a cheap taste test.  Lobster and butter, yummy.

First Class on domestic flights, how much "free"  booze can you drink? 
        I've only got upgraded, never paid for it. Sometimes slept through it.
        Business class on transpacific flights? Totally worth it on the company dime. 
        I was functional after a 14 hour trip.

Kaikou

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chick-fil-a

justajane

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And there are times when a light lager like Bud Light is just the ticket--after a long day of yard work on a summer day, they are light and refreshing and perfect.  A heavy, thick, complex beer is not what I would want in that situation.

You'll almost certainly be able to tell the difference between Bud Light and Stella Artois in a blind taste test.  But the real question is which one you like--if Stella doesn't pass the Dacyczyn Test, drink your Bud Light with joy and tell your beer snob friends that they can go take a hike.  :)

I hear ya on lots of things you write, including the stout earlier and the post-yard work beer. I want something I can gulp down.

You're probably right about the blind taste test, although now I think I'm going to do it out of curiosity. My husband just informed me that the fair comparison would be Stella versus Budweiser (not Bud Lite), though.

What else could I taste test? Costco has generic beer we could taste against the craft brands.

Giro

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+1 to not buying organic. It's just a trend that shouldn't exist. The people that insist on only organic generally are the same ones who are against all GMOs, MSG, etc. There's no basis other than the fear tactics placed in stores like Whole Foods. I agree with not eating junk full of preservatives, unhealthy oils and HFCS, but there's very little to zero scientific evidence supporting the fact that organic is better.

To me, it seems all or nothing. If you're going to buy organic only part of the time (when you feel like "splurging", or you are feeling particularly fearful), then what's the point? If at any point in time you're going to expose yourself to the "dangers" of non-organic, then why ever buy organic to begin with? Plus, how do you truly know what you're getting? I don't trust these corporations and stores to do everything properly, thus I just don't bother with it. It's all an exploitation in marketing as far as I'm concerned.

I love the look and feel of Whole Foods stores, and the like, but it also has such a pretentious feel to it at the same time. (Not everything in Whole Foods is overpriced, but a LOT of it is. Damn, even eating at their food bar requires a $200k+ salary).

+1 non-organic.   

I work with a bus load of people who only shop organic but go out to eat 3-4 times a week.  They are also almost all overweight.  If you want to be healthy, don't eat junk (we all know what junk is) and exercise regularly.  That will do 1000 times more good than your organic, free-range, non-GMO, vegan, non-gluten food type substance.

My husband and I buy 20 pounds of 1.99lb chicken breasts every single week and whatever fruits and veggies are in season and CHEAP....THE HORROR.   

DeltaBond

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+1 to not buying organic. It's just a trend that shouldn't exist. The people that insist on only organic generally are the same ones who are against all GMOs, MSG, etc. There's no basis other than the fear tactics placed in stores like Whole Foods. I agree with not eating junk full of preservatives, unhealthy oils and HFCS, but there's very little to zero scientific evidence supporting the fact that organic is better.

To me, it seems all or nothing. If you're going to buy organic only part of the time (when you feel like "splurging", or you are feeling particularly fearful), then what's the point? If at any point in time you're going to expose yourself to the "dangers" of non-organic, then why ever buy organic to begin with? Plus, how do you truly know what you're getting? I don't trust these corporations and stores to do everything properly, thus I just don't bother with it. It's all an exploitation in marketing as far as I'm concerned.

I love the look and feel of Whole Foods stores, and the like, but it also has such a pretentious feel to it at the same time. (Not everything in Whole Foods is overpriced, but a LOT of it is. Damn, even eating at their food bar requires a $200k+ salary).

+1 non-organic.   

I work with a bus load of people who only shop organic but go out to eat 3-4 times a week.  They are also almost all overweight.  If you want to be healthy, don't eat junk (we all know what junk is) and exercise regularly.  That will do 1000 times more good than your organic, free-range, non-GMO, vegan, non-gluten food type substance.

My husband and I buy 20 pounds of 1.99lb chicken breasts every single week and whatever fruits and veggies are in season and CHEAP....THE HORROR.

+1   - I, too, don't fall for the organic fad.  And yes, its a fad based on wonky propoganda that seems to be put out by the CONSUMERS, lol.  I personally don't like pesticides in my food, and I don't like elimating things like gluten when there is no need to.  Those two things alone cause serious health problems.

Slee_stack

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If Organic is less than 10% more I might buy it if it is also unwaxed/uncoated.

Sometimes the wax is out of control!

Inaya

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Chipotle. I could make 8 burritos at home for the same price as 1 Chipotle burrito, and they'd taste way better. I give my coworker any free coupons I get in the mail, and he gets so excited you'd think I'd given him a raise or something. I don't get it.

Some restaurant meals aren't worth it. I do enjoy eating out, and while some restaurants are worth the price tag--you can't win every time.

Commercial kefir drinks. They're delicious, but packed with sugar, and the probiotics are probably mostly dead. And they're so expensive. You can make it at home with almost zero effort and the only cost is the price of the milk you ferment.

Cat toys. The little idiot plays with a toy about 2 seconds, then goes back to chewing on a cardboard box. But this big idiot can't stop buying them. (However, the $140 backpack carrier and the $70 cat tent were totally worth it.)

Rollin

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Women.



Just kidding just kidding (its Friday before a holiday weekend so I'm feelin' my oats), but I couldn't resist (happily married for many years BTW).

GrOW

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Highend Steakhouses - while their chefs are often masters of their craft and make dishes that are to die for, I am happy grilling my own steaks when I am in the mood.

American beer at a European bar - I love to try a wide variety of beers but on trip, after about 5 days of trying locals beers, I wanted a good old American lager. After paying $9 for one, I decided that $4-5 local beers were just fine again.

Frequent Live sporting events - while I am in to go to a game once every five years or so, my tv room with friends and family is an awesome place to watch a game and it's about 1/20th the cost.


zolotiyeruki

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Expensive hotels, or even mid-range ones.  Not only is the room more expensive, but you have to pay extra for breakfast (since there's usually a restaurant on-site) and internet.  Cheaper hotels often provide both for free.

SaskyStache

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Highend Steakhouses - while their chefs are often masters of their craft and make dishes that are to die for, I am happy grilling my own steaks when I am in the mood.

I second this. I don't mind eating out every now and then, but I don't order steaks. The best steaks always seemed to be the ones I grill myself or that friends and family cook.

Cable
Fancy Hotels
Lobster
Acupuncture (not for me)

afuera

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chick-fil-a
Chick-Fil-A is literally the only place I ever get "fast food" and I rarely go more than once a month (usually a lot less than that).
I love it so much.

undercover

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chick-fil-a
Chick-Fil-A is literally the only place I ever get "fast food" and I rarely go more than once a month (usually a lot less than that).
I love it so much.

Same? I have no idea what Kaikou is smoking.

Chipotle. I could make 8 burritos at home for the same price as 1 Chipotle burrito, and they'd taste way better. I give my coworker any free coupons I get in the mail, and he gets so excited you'd think I'd given him a raise or something. I don't get it.

Say whaaa? I mean I know Chipotle is a bit overrated sometimes, but it's one of the better places to eat if you're going to spend < $10. I would love to see the details behind getting 8 (!?) burritos that big for the price of ~$7.50.