Author Topic: Expensive things that are cheap  (Read 21440 times)

MgoSam

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Expensive things that are cheap
« on: June 10, 2013, 08:47:10 PM »
I read that many millionares wear Allen Edmonds shows beause they are nice and they last a long time. Then if the sole wear out, they can get them fixed for a nominal fee, and the shoes are as good as new.

Are there other brands that the affluent among us know about, and would recommend to this person that is relatively new? I am fairly frugal, to the point of being cheap when it comes to buying things. With clothes I buy whatever I can find that is cheap and gets the job done, and that's about it. I could use advice on buying things that last, and that over the long-run are worth it.

Thankfully, my car is a 2004 Camry that has 120,000 miles on it and that I hope lasts another 120,000. I don't know any other things to buy that would be considered wise, and I look forward to your advice.

nawhite

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2013, 08:59:45 PM »
Shoe trees and a second pair of shoes to alternate with. Put the shoe trees in the pair you aren't wearing that day. Your shoes will go from needing to be replaced every year to needing to be replaced every 5-7 years (contingent on soles). I have 2 pairs of Clark's which have been treating me fantastically for 3+ years so far and look fantastic and feel even better.

Also, solid antique furniture. Many people don't believe this but older furniture is actually more sturdy than new furniture (even if you buy high end amish or stickly). The reason is that new wood isn't "old growth" which grew slowly and densely. New wood grows on tree farms or in previously clear cut areas and thus grows really fast but less densely. So old antique furniture made of old growth wood lasts much longer and is much stronger than new furniture.

dragoncar

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2013, 09:02:43 PM »
Yeah I read that about Allen Edmonds so purchased a couple pair.  I don't wear them except to fancy events because resoling costs a lot around here and I wear down the heel with my gait.  I also walk about 4 miles per day.  Much cheaper to get burner shoes.  I guess I could change into the AEs at work, but really it's not worth it since cheap dress shoes cost the same as sneakers.

Quote
The reason is that new wood isn't "old growth" which grew slowly and densely. New wood grows on tree farms or in previously clear cut areas and thus grows really fast but less densely. So old antique furniture made of old growth wood lasts much longer and is much stronger than new furniture.

Same with houses to some extent.  I cringe every time I see a new building going up with particleboard up the wazoo.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 09:04:53 PM by dragoncar »

Rebecca Stapler

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2013, 09:16:32 PM »
I am not affluent, but we received a set of All Clad stainless steel pots and pans for our wedding. They are awesome. We never think twice about them -- they are just good, sturdy pots and pans. Nonstick pans, for the most part, have to be replaced after wears of use, because the nonstick coating breaks down, stops working, and becomes toxic. I like keeping it simple with the stainless steel.

Mustache Fatty

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2013, 09:23:07 PM »
The first thing that came to my mind when I read the original post was PVC patio furniture.  We've had the same set for almost 10 years now and it cleans up looking like new.  It is pricey, but I can't imagine how many rounds of cheap outdoor furniture we haven't had to buy as a result of this decision.  Just a thought, if applicable to you.

capital

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2013, 11:41:21 PM »
I have had used Allen Edmonds shoes. They are nice, but being dress shoes they still need to be treated gently to last. Bicycle pedals can tear the shit out of the soles and scuff the sides permanently, for example. For the active lifestyle, a resoleable pair of boots is probably a better option, and where I am directly my attention.

clutchy

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2013, 11:56:53 PM »
I am not affluent, but we received a set of All Clad stainless steel pots and pans for our wedding. They are awesome. We never think twice about them -- they are just good, sturdy pots and pans. Nonstick pans, for the most part, have to be replaced after wears of use, because the nonstick coating breaks down, stops working, and becomes toxic. I like keeping it simple with the stainless steel.

we've had our allclad for 9 years now and it still looks and works great.  I love the stuff and cringe when I have to use anything else.  Nice knives are also invaluable. 

certain things it's just not worth skimping on.

dragoncar

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2013, 12:02:34 AM »
The first thing that came to my mind when I read the original post was PVC patio furniture.  We've had the same set for almost 10 years now and it cleans up looking like new.  It is pricey, but I can't imagine how many rounds of cheap outdoor furniture we haven't had to buy as a result of this decision.  Just a thought, if applicable to you.

Is PVC a particular brand or are you talking about any plastic patio furniture? 

nktokyo

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2013, 12:14:18 AM »
I think we're all onboard with better quality stuff lasting longer... the trick is to stop spending money once you have what you need.

I used to wear a suit to work and after a couple of years I started getting nice suits, made to order and expensive shoes. Everything lasted longer and to be honest I enjoyed everything fitting exactly. It makes a good impression with customers also.

I live in Japan, meaning that off-the-shelf stuff had to come from my home country in order to fit and made-to-order suits are not hugely expensive due to the massive volume of people buying suits in a relatively small area. For the same reason when I go clothes shopping I tend to not really set a budget and shop at better quality places because I don't know when I'll next be able to buy stuff that fits. So I'll spend $300-400 on new clothes but that might be it for 1-2 years.

As a landlord I've found it worth the expense of paying extra for better materials when doing maintenance.

kolorado

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2013, 07:21:48 AM »
I am not affluent, but we received a set of All Clad stainless steel pots and pans for our wedding. They are awesome. We never think twice about them -- they are just good, sturdy pots and pans. Nonstick pans, for the most part, have to be replaced after wears of use, because the nonstick coating breaks down, stops working, and becomes toxic. I like keeping it simple with the stainless steel.

we've had our allclad for 9 years now and it still looks and works great.  I love the stuff and cringe when I have to use anything else.  Nice knives are also invaluable. 

certain things it's just not worth skimping on.

As a person who worked in restaurants for three+ years and has been an avid cook for 25 years I have to disagree strongly here. I'm sure AllClad is awesome and gives you a wonderful feeling every time you use it but I doubt your results in fancy pans are any different than my results in cheap pans.  I received a $60 set of no-name teflon pans as a wedding shower gift 13 years ago then changed over to stainless piece by piece as the teflon pieces became scratched. I picked up my new pans at bargain department stores(Boscov's, Marshall's), Ikea and outlets over a period of 4 years. I spent less than than $70 on 6 new stainless pieces. I reused the lids from the teflon set so that I could spend less on the replacement pans. Thrift stores are also loaded with pan lids for $.50-$1.50 each so that's another great way to save on new pans. I often see nice stainless pans at thrift stores here in CO for $4-12 each. They were exceptionally rare to see in the secondhand market when I lived in NJ so selection is highly regional.
So yeah, my pans don't match and they aren't a big brand but I dare you to find anyone who isn't impressed with my cooking.
 My brother and his wife have a nice set of premium stainless Calphalon pans. They rarely cook and mostly eat out or processed items from the freezer. I see this in many households that have fancy name pans. It tells me that the brand name, advertising, and feeling of status from ownership are alluring to people to such a degree that they can't logically evaluate their real need for the product. And with a product like this, it's impossible to establish a real "need" since there are plenty of known, reliable and better priced alternatives.
New set of AllClad on Amazon, $600. My pans, $70. Savings of $530 at 5% interest over 25 year life of pans: $1850.
Some things are just not worth it.

Rural

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2013, 07:26:22 AM »
$600 for a set of pans? Really? Guess I'll stick with the stainless set that was a wedding gift to my parents 48 years ago.

Rebecca Stapler

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2013, 11:43:06 AM »
I am not affluent, but we received a set of All Clad stainless steel pots and pans for our wedding. They are awesome. We never think twice about them -- they are just good, sturdy pots and pans. Nonstick pans, for the most part, have to be replaced after wears of use, because the nonstick coating breaks down, stops working, and becomes toxic. I like keeping it simple with the stainless steel.

we've had our allclad for 9 years now and it still looks and works great.  I love the stuff and cringe when I have to use anything else.  Nice knives are also invaluable. 

certain things it's just not worth skimping on.

New set of AllClad on Amazon, $600. My pans, $70. Savings of $530 at 5% interest over 25 year life of pans: $1850.
Some things are just not worth it.

Like I wrote, our pans were free :) The families wanted to buy us fancy china, but we wanted durable pans.

I imagine there are a lot of good stainless pots and pans that will last a while, and I think they probably all outlast nonstick-ers. Not only do they last longer, but stainless has improved my cooking. I could never make a good pan sauce in non-stick: there aren't any of those brown bits to scrape up.

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2013, 11:51:08 AM »
Looking around my house, one of the only fancypants items we have is a Bokhara Persian rug.  We bought it second-hand at a consignment store 20 years ago and it still looks brand new despite years of abuse.

These aren't luxury items, but we also swear by Lands End Supima towels.  Hands down, best quality towels we've ever bought.  Sometimes Lands End has the less popular colors on sale.

We also love handmade textiles by a small company in Toronto called Bookhou - http://www.bookhou.com/collections/household .  They deliver worldwide and their stuff is indestructible.  We use the small storage boxes throughout the house and the tea towels to cover scratches and dents on bedroom furniture that we bought second-hand.

Lina

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2013, 01:54:11 PM »
I have had the fancy quality china, stainless steel pans, cutlery and knives since I moved away from home when I was sixteen. Now 16 years later they still look like new and they function well. There has not been a need to replace anything. My mother and relatives has bought me and my siblings the stuff since we were kids.

Clothes and shoes are also items were I prefer buying quality. Mostly I shop at sales were you can get classical pieces  for a lot less than normal prices. As the fit is classical you can wear the clothes years. I use the ppu-formula, i.e. price per use. Take for example a 150 dollar cardigan (before you faint, I am not living in US) that will last at least 5 years and you will use at least once a weak during these five years. The ppu will be 58 cents, which makes the purchase ok. On the other hand you could by a dress for the same amount that you will probably use once a year during those years which will make the ppu 30 USD. Maybe not worth it.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 02:03:10 PM by Lina »

A440

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2013, 10:52:16 PM »
I like to find my expensive things after they have become cheap.  I love the goodwill as-is store--clothes by the pound.  Most things will end up being less than a $1--keeps the price per use quite low.   

dweebyhawkeyes

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2013, 12:13:00 AM »
My job is very hard on my shoes, so I bought a beautiful pair of cherry red vegan Dr. Marten's boots that have lasted two years so far with no issues. They are more comfortable each time I wear them. Also, all the cute dresses I've bought from lame places like Target and Ross have fallen apart while time-tested thrift store finds lasted years before I wore them out. Since I wear dresses more often than not, I've actually been considering commissioning a couple short-sleeved A-line dresses custom-made with sturdy fabric and overkill stitching...

Oh! And of course, my bicycle! My bicycle was $1200 new, but is a really nice electric bike that leaves me zero excuses to wimp out and not ride it.

Hadilly

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2013, 12:16:41 AM »
I am very fond of Klean Kanteens in lieu of water bottles. We have about six in various sizes. The sports top is excellent for drinking. They clean up well. No weird plastic linings. I also like their insulated canteen for carrying around tea (no more Peets and Starbuck!).

My only suggestion would be to stick with the stainless as opposed to color. The paint is not super durable.

GoStumpy

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2013, 12:38:17 AM »
Apparently some higher end clothing companies make extremely durable clothes... so much so that they offer lifetime warranties to worksmanship.... so as long as you don't rip it on a nail, if any seam breaks, they replace it... and they also repair if you do damage them due to misuse..

I have one shirt and one pair of shorts, going to get a jacket this fall... Patagonia. 


My Dad is retired and swears by Merrell shoes & clothing... Another swears by Keen shoes... I'll be buying a pair of Keen steeltoes pretty soon

Ozstache

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2013, 01:30:00 AM »
I'm a big fan of Merrill shoes. Pricy, but outstanding build quality and comfort. I will continue to infrequently buy these when I ER.

ace1224

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2013, 06:03:31 AM »
I've had the same pair of Rainbow flip flops for 12 years and they still fit and feel great, best 45 dollars I spent freshman year.

tuyop

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2013, 07:03:16 AM »
Hiking equipment is such a good example of this, because the Law of the Trichotomy of Technical Gear applies:

Durability
Affordability
Portability (weight)

You can only have two.

Buy a totally excellent example of each layer or piece of gear once, take care of it and respect it and you'll have a much better time than if you cheap out and constantly destroy your cheap, lightweight offbrand crap.

GoStumpy

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2013, 07:14:49 AM »
I was reading up on the Patagonia gear's warranty.. jackets etc... There are people there that have been wearing the same jackets since the 80's!!!  And some have 25 year old gear that busted a zipper... and they gave them a credit worth what he paid 25 years ago + the increase in prices since then!  That's pretty good taking care of your clothing if it's lasting 10+ years.

hybrid

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2013, 01:20:00 PM »
Brick instead of siding for your house.  Our home was built 51 years ago by a builder with a really great reputation for quality and the homes in our neighborhood are just rock solid.  And because mine was built in 1962 the interior walls are a lot thicker as well so the home is far more quiet than the much newer one we built back in 1989.  And of course we have very little in painting costs, just some trim on the sides and edges.  Love, love, love my brick rancher.

I also cannot recommend an attic fan strongly enough.  We installed one last year and getting rid of that 130 degree blanket on top of the house made an immediate difference in out cooling bills.  We spent about $400 including installation but it was money well spent.

GlobalStache

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2013, 03:18:57 PM »
My husband has used Allen Edmonds for years.  He's had several pairs re-soled, too.  I don't recall thinking the re-soles were much cheaper than a new pair...but my husband originally picked the shoes to "last forever" (i.e. never have to spend time shopping again).  For him, it was about laziness (see prior parenthesis) AND about good-looking shoes that fit like a glove (after the shoes are broken in but then re-soled they still fit considerably better than a new pair of shoes).  My husband has a suit job, so his feet must look the part every day.

I second the comment about cast-iron pans.  If you cannot find an old used one (from your family or from a thrift store), Lodge Cast Iron is the way to go...and, dare I say, Walmart has a decent selection.  And in case some are not aware, using cast iron regularly also adds iron to your food...without having to always pay for pricey iron sources (e.g. meat).  Not sure how much it adds, but it does add an amount worth noting.  (I know "rich", "poor", "young" and "old" people who use cast iron; it seems to be a kithcen staple for all kinds of folks!)

Apparently, Clarks has a lifetime warranty on their socks.  We were told when we bought a few pairs that if they EVER "go bad" (any runs, heal gets worn, etc.), that the company will replace them for free.  I said to the clerk "that means I never have to buy socks again!" and he actually said "yes".  We haven't tested this yet...
« Last Edit: June 12, 2013, 03:22:48 PM by GlobalStache »

nktokyo

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2013, 08:46:08 PM »
Affluent people buy expensive things that last, using income produced by their assets that are growing in value.

The second half of the sentence is more important than the first.

MgoSam

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2013, 03:29:34 AM »
Thanks for the advice! I do want to buy a decent pair of shoes and am going to be looking at both Allen Edmonds and Cole Haans.

I'm not really a stylish person, but want to start dressing a little nicer, but without the price tag. My job doesn't require me to dress nicely, most days I will wear jeans and a button-down, occasionally while traveling I will wear black pants and a slightly nicer button-down, so I am wondering if anyone has any recommendations for jeans and button-downs and what stores to go to? I hate shopping, but should I be going to Marshalls to look around?

Do you recommend outlet malls? There isn't one close to me, but I will be going on a road trip for work in a few weeks and there is an outlet mall on the way.

tuyop

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2013, 06:08:34 AM »
Thanks for the advice! I do want to buy a decent pair of shoes and am going to be looking at both Allen Edmonds and Cole Haans.

I'm not really a stylish person, but want to start dressing a little nicer, but without the price tag. My job doesn't require me to dress nicely, most days I will wear jeans and a button-down, occasionally while traveling I will wear black pants and a slightly nicer button-down, so I am wondering if anyone has any recommendations for jeans and button-downs and what stores to go to? I hate shopping, but should I be going to Marshalls to look around?

Do you recommend outlet malls? There isn't one close to me, but I will be going on a road trip for work in a few weeks and there is an outlet mall on the way.

I recently bought an outfit to get married in (civil wedding) from an outlet mall. Would have been ~$200 at a normal store, I spent about $75. The quality seemed great, and I wasn't going to get married in thrift shop stuff.

I've been wearing Rockports for like ten years, which is three pairs for style reasons rather than wear. Love them.

nawhite

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2013, 09:25:18 AM »
I'm not really a stylish person, but want to start dressing a little nicer, but without the price tag. My job doesn't require me to dress nicely, most days I will wear jeans and a button-down.

My situation is similar to yours and what I've found is that the most cost effective way to get nice shirts is to have your shirts tailored. ~$15 / shirt to look 10 times better. I buy from thrift shops and then take them to a tailor and I have the nicest looking shirts of anyone in my office because they fit correctly. When you buy, buy for the correct fit in the shoulders and the arm length then get a tailor to take in the sides appropriately. You'll look great no matter where you buy the shirt.

totoro

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2013, 10:12:26 AM »
Affluent people buy expensive things that last, using income produced by their assets that are growing in value.

The second half of the sentence is more important than the first.

I agree this is the best way to make sense of expensive purchases!

RadicalPersonalFinance

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2013, 03:57:36 PM »
I don't wear them except to fancy events because resoling costs a lot around here and I wear down the heel with my gait.

Ask the cobbler who re-soles the shoes for a little wedge on the heel.  They have a small rubber wedge they can install on the heel on whichever side you wear down.  They just nail it into the heel.  It will keep the heel from wearing unevenly.  Costs about $3.  Whenever the wedge is worn down, put a new one on for $3.  Much cheaper than doing a whole new re-sole.

RadicalPersonalFinance

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #30 on: June 13, 2013, 03:58:46 PM »
I have had used Allen Edmonds shoes. They are nice, but being dress shoes they still need to be treated gently to last. Bicycle pedals can tear the shit out of the soles and scuff the sides permanently, for example.

Consider having rubber soles put on under the leather and they'll last a lot longer on the bicycle pedals.  I used to go through the leather soles way too quickly until I started doing this.

snshijuptr

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #31 on: June 13, 2013, 04:17:22 PM »
I've heard this practice called "buy it for life". There is even a subreddit for it.

I know a couple people have mentioned the durability of thrift store clothes. I figure anything I buy from a thrift store that still looks great will stay that way considering it already stood the test of use.

Another way to "buy it for life" is to read and follow the maintenance directions. Clean and dry knives right after use. Grease stainless steal. Don't use metal on teflon. Air dry clothes. Change filters and bags in vacuums. Etc, etc, etc.

SnackDog

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #32 on: June 16, 2013, 03:24:27 AM »
A friend of mine booked a very exclusive suite on the QE2 for her inaugural UK-NYC voyage after major refitting in about 1999.  He paid about $14,000 for the three-night crossing.  Because the refurbishment was not complete, the ship sailed in a disastrous state with a couple hundred English tradies on board still finishing plumbing, painting, etc.  Most of the passengers had a such a disastrous trip that Cunard was waiting at the dock in New York to offer everyone a credit for a free repeat trip.  My buddy, however, having booked such an exclusive room, had a fabulous trip, never saw any of the issues which affected those in the lower echelons, got his $14,000 worth and went again the next year, in the same cabin, for free using the voucher.

Another friend found out in the 70s that QE2 allowed unlimited luggage and used it to move his family and all his belongings home to NYC, saving significant moving cost.

jfer_rose

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #33 on: June 16, 2013, 04:10:51 AM »
It occurs to me that there is another way expensive things can be cheap. I'm thinking about maple syrup. A friend who spent some time producing maple syrup taught me that grade B syrup has more maple flavor than grade A, and the grade B is also cheaper.

Another similar example is marble. Marble with a lot of veins is cheaper than marble without a lot of veins. This one is super subjective, but to me the veins are what make marble desirable. Give me the veins please. (Not that buying marble is mustachian.)

markstache

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #34 on: June 16, 2013, 08:23:50 AM »
My situation is similar to yours and what I've found is that the most cost effective way to get nice shirts is to have your shirts tailored. ~$15 / shirt to look 10 times better. I buy from thrift shops and then take them to a tailor and I have the nicest looking shirts of anyone in my office because they fit correctly. When you buy, buy for the correct fit in the shoulders and the arm length then get a tailor to take in the sides appropriately. You'll look great no matter where you buy the shirt.

I do this myself with a sewing machine. I'm willing to believe that a tailor would be better than me at it, but I get the additional satisfaction of saying that I did it myself. My mother in law brought her serger over this week. It might be a good time to get some more shirts...

rosarugosa

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #35 on: June 16, 2013, 02:56:41 PM »
Duralex drinking glasses.  We got a set when we got married 28 years ago, and we've only had to replace about 3 of a set of 24.  We use them every day, and you can put boiling water in them or freeze them, so they're very versatile.

dragoncar

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #36 on: June 17, 2013, 01:35:57 AM »
It occurs to me that there is another way expensive things can be cheap. I'm thinking about maple syrup. A friend who spent some time producing maple syrup taught me that grade B syrup has more maple flavor than grade A, and the grade B is also cheaper.


Love me some grade B!  It's harder to find though...

davisgang90

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #37 on: June 17, 2013, 03:44:21 AM »
I've got an LL Bean leather jacket I bought in college, LL Bean has replaced the zipper at least twice for free.  Of course it has shrunk a little over 25 years...

On the older furniture topic, I bought a 6 drawer desk at Goodwill for $30.  Bought a replacement lock online for $5 and the lock mechanism still works for all the drawers.  The desk is a tank and once(if) I refinish it will look awesome. 

Cinder

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #38 on: June 17, 2013, 04:09:52 AM »
The reason is that new wood isn't "old growth" which grew slowly and densely. New wood grows on tree farms or in previously clear cut areas and thus grows really fast but less densely.

My bedframe and most of my other new furniture that came with me has several deep marks from things lightly tapping against each other, either by absentlymindedly running into it, or my failure to overly compleatly put supper padding between every little thing (I had furnature covers which prevented surface scuffs/marks, but the soft wood gives way too quickly)

rockstache

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2013, 12:40:55 PM »
I've had the same pair of Rainbow flip flops for 12 years and they still fit and feel great, best 45 dollars I spent freshman year.

+1. My 12 year old Rainbows are still going too, and I love them.

MgoSam

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #40 on: June 17, 2013, 02:12:02 PM »
When you guys mentioned wood and that old wood is better, can you explain what you mean? I have very little experience in woodcraft, so I am wondering where do you buy older wood without paying a premium for it? Thanks!

Does anyone here go shopping for dress clothes at thrift stores? Or go to thrift stores in general? If so, any recommendations on what to look for?

destron

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #41 on: June 17, 2013, 02:40:34 PM »
I am not affluent, but we received a set of All Clad stainless steel pots and pans for our wedding. They are awesome. We never think twice about them -- they are just good, sturdy pots and pans. Nonstick pans, for the most part, have to be replaced after wears of use, because the nonstick coating breaks down, stops working, and becomes toxic. I like keeping it simple with the stainless steel.

we've had our allclad for 9 years now and it still looks and works great.  I love the stuff and cringe when I have to use anything else.  Nice knives are also invaluable. 

certain things it's just not worth skimping on.

I have a really nice set of Cuisinart Multiclad pots and pans. Still fairly expensive but less than half the same All Clad. Aluminum core and reviewed better in Cook's Illustrated (if that means anything). I am very happy with them although I've only had them for 3 years. I cook quite a bit.

grantmeaname

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #42 on: June 17, 2013, 03:51:40 PM »
So far I just have one of these anodized aluminum pans, and I'm absolutely in love with it. I'm waiting for the rest of my anodized, teflon-coated pans to get chipped enough that I declare them dead, so I can expand the collection. It just does such a nice job with everything!

captainawesome

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #43 on: June 17, 2013, 05:44:00 PM »
Based on what I do for a living, I have learned the hard way on some things.  This can also be applied to mountain/camping gear.  I learned early in my career taking care of your feet, which means investing expensive/good socks (Darn tough are my favorite, followed by Fox river) and comfortable/quality boots/shoes (Asolo, Salomons, Salewa).  Next would be things like pocket knives and knives in general.  I can't tell you how many crappy knives I bought until I figured that out.  Buy a decent knife once, and you'll carry it for the rest of your life.  Backpacks, if you use it a lot, buy the good stuff off the bat.  Arcteryx and Patagonia make amazing clothing and have great warranties on their stuff, and it works.  Nothing worse than being cold and wet for hours on end. 

And totally not related to my job, I love my rainbow sandals.  I have 3 pairs.  Once has been with me everywhere for years, and still keeps going.  They also stand behind their product. 

dragoncar

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #44 on: June 17, 2013, 07:46:17 PM »
“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

nktokyo

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #45 on: June 17, 2013, 08:34:21 PM »
“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that'd still be keeping his feet dry in ten years' time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes 'Boots' theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

Oh man I love DW books. They're one of the few things I buy as soon as they come out regardless of cost.

markstache

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #46 on: June 17, 2013, 08:41:05 PM »
Old wood was from old growth forest. New wood is from factory farm forest. Guess which is better?

Time for me to read some more disk world. I have read at least 3 vimes/city watch books. But none had that quote.

nktokyo

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2013, 08:45:00 PM »
It's in Men at Arms.

ivyhedge

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Re: Expensive things that are cheap
« Reply #48 on: June 18, 2013, 10:15:45 AM »
I don't wear them except to fancy events because resoling costs a lot around here and I wear down the heel with my gait.

Ask the cobbler who re-soles the shoes for a little wedge on the heel.  They have a small rubber wedge they can install on the heel on whichever side you wear down.  They just nail it into the heel.  It will keep the heel from wearing unevenly.  Costs about $3.  Whenever the wedge is worn down, put a new one on for $3.  Much cheaper than doing a whole new re-sole.


The difficulty with this solution is that it doesn't address the inherent pronation or supination of the subject's ambulation. If one adds a heel slip to compensate, one is redefining the foot bed's plane. This can lead to all sorts of ankle issues.


Carefully chosen shoes, or interior supports that are custom fit to the subject, will help.


Reference: years of running (with pronation compensation).