Author Topic: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?  (Read 23645 times)

BlueMR2

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #50 on: December 06, 2015, 03:14:55 PM »
My dentist recommends it, but I haven't bought one yet.  It's kind of hard to clear that price hurdle for me.  Plus, not a fan of things that require recharging.  I get clean checkups now *except* for there's evidence that I'm actually brushing some of the enamel off of my teeth.  She told me to brush *less* (shorter length of time) and softer.  I'm afraid with an electric I'd burn that enamel right off of my teeth...

Carolina on My Mind

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #51 on: December 06, 2015, 03:48:27 PM »
My dentist and dental hygienist have been recommending that I get an electric toothbrush for years, so this year I finally broke down and bought an Oral-B.  No question that my teeth feel cleaner when I use the electric brush.  I don't think they're essential -- I lived without one for 45 years -- but I also don't think they're a frivolous purchase, especially for those of us who don't have the world's greatest teeth.

I practice good dental hygiene and faithfully get my teeth cleaned every six months.  To offset the cost of the electric toothbrush (as well as the recurring cost of replacement heads for a good long while), I simply skipped a cleaning.  I figured missing one won't kill me.

MMMaybe

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #52 on: December 06, 2015, 06:59:14 PM »
Totally worth it. Aside from replacement of old fillings,  I have not had dental work done in years, besides my twice yearly cleans and check ups. My gums don't bleed either.

My Sonicare died so I replaced it with an Oral B a while back but I plan to go back to Sonicare. Its really the best.

lbmustache

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #53 on: December 08, 2015, 05:29:53 PM »
Bumping this to say I picked one up today. I have been concerned about my teeth and flossing and brushing still leave me with mild periodontitis. Which means I have to use the stupid mouthwash that turns your teeth yellow, ugh. I also got my wisdom teeth removed which left a hard to reach area behind my remaining wisdom teeth.

Both ORAL-B and Sonicare are on sale at Costco, including the brush heads. It is a set of 2 for $75 ($25 off their usual price). I think the sets go for around $110 at Amazon and one style even goes for about $90 individually!

I picked up the Oral-B only because I think I like the circular head better than the traditionally-shaped head. I split the cost with my brother (he got one, I got one).

Hoping this solves my dental issues, if not, I guess that's what Costco's return policy is for, ha.

spokey doke

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #54 on: December 09, 2015, 06:16:47 PM »
So this thread had me searching reviews of electric toothbrushes, and from what I can see, Oral-B regularly beats out
Sonicare (particularly when price is factored in).  But there is a lot of love for Sonicare here...insights and explanations (before I order my Oral-B from Amazon)?

Spork

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #55 on: December 09, 2015, 06:26:28 PM »
So this thread had me searching reviews of electric toothbrushes, and from what I can see, Oral-B regularly beats out
Sonicare (particularly when price is factored in).  But there is a lot of love for Sonicare here...insights and explanations (before I order my Oral-B from Amazon)?

I've had 2 Sonicares over 15-20 years.  There is nothing wrong with them.  My 2nd one is wearing out (i.e, the NiCads are dying).  I've replaced the NiCads before... but it's a bit of a pain.   I just ordered an Oral B last week because the price difference was pretty substantial.

Rural

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #56 on: December 09, 2015, 07:27:32 PM »
 I have a small mouth and usually need soft brushes anyway, so I use the little "disposable" children's electric toothbrushes. One lasts me the better part of year, costs under five dollars, gets my teeth much much cleaner than a manual toothbrush,  doesn't require new batteries or recharging, and generally has amusing properties. For example , the current is a Hello Kitty toothbrush.  I think I may do Ninja Turtles next. 

MMMaybe

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #57 on: December 09, 2015, 08:49:55 PM »
So this thread had me searching reviews of electric toothbrushes, and from what I can see, Oral-B regularly beats out
Sonicare (particularly when price is factored in).  But there is a lot of love for Sonicare here...insights and explanations (before I order my Oral-B from Amazon)?

Having just gone back to a Sonicare from an Oral B...

My teeth feel cleaner generally when using the Sonicare. The dentist will be happy to know that I have just bought a new Sonicare as my dental report card slipped from an excellent to a good while using (the admittedly lower grade) Oral B. There did seem to be more plaque.

However, I would say that flossing is still a major component of good dental health and a fancy toothbrush can't make up for that. So that may also be a major factor in my good dental health :)

Cpa Cat

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #58 on: December 09, 2015, 09:09:01 PM »
I used to think I had awful teeth and bad genes because I had multiple cavities every time I went to the dentist.

Then I started using a Sonicare - and since then, have rarely gotten a cavity.

It turns out that it wasn't my teeth that were bad - it was my method of brushing. In particular, the Sonicare had a 2 minute timer on it where it stopped automatically after 2 mins. I don't think I ever brushed my teeth long enough or thoroughly enough prior to getting the electric brush with a timer.

I do use off-brand replacement heads for my Sonicare. I've never owned any other brand, so I don't have an opinion. Personally, I think the automatic stop timer is the most important feature, and I would not purchase an electric toothbrush that did not have that.

In terms of Mustachianism - the Sonicares (I'm on my second brush), have recouped their cost many times over in dental care savings.

SirOcelot

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #59 on: December 10, 2015, 09:55:37 AM »
I've used a Sonicare for years.  It cleans my teeth much more efficiently than I can manage with a manual brush, so I feel I've had a good return on the investment.  I can't compare it with any other brands, though.

Tip for extending head life (and reducing TCO):  the Sonicare is also very efficient at cleaning its own bristles.  If you make a habit of turning it on while rinsing it under the faucet, it'll accumulate gunk much more slowly.

crazyworld

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #60 on: December 10, 2015, 10:19:02 AM »
Depends on the person.  Everyone's mouth ecology is different (per the dentist). I used to need 4 cleanings a year.  I started sonicare several years ago and was down to 2 cleanings within a few months.  It is the cheapest sonicare and the heads are not super expensive.  DH uses a regular brush and his teeth are fine with it.  Just depends.  The ones calling it consumerist are just the ones not in need of getting one, which is quite all right.  This is a question for your dentist.

MandalayVA

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #61 on: December 10, 2015, 10:38:58 AM »
Another Sonicare fan here.  I used to have to go for quarterly cleanings and almost always had a cavity to boot.  Within six months of using the Sonicare I was able to drop down the cleanings to twice a year and haven't had a cavity in years.  Well worth what I paid for it!

Dee18

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #62 on: December 10, 2015, 10:49:51 AM »
I prefer OralB electric toothbrushes.  I just bought one online at Walmart (professional 1000 model) for $30 and they have a $15 rebate so my cost will be $15.  The rebate offer is good the rest of this year, and to avoid the shipping charge you can have it delivered to your nearest Walmart.  My dentist really urges the use of an electric toothbrush.

Tetsuya Hondo

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #63 on: December 10, 2015, 10:55:20 AM »
Yet another Sonicare convert here.

Since I've been using them, I have no more cavities and very little of that awful scraping from the hygienist. While they gouge you on the heads, I think I've saved money overall compared to my pre-Sonicare days in fillings, etc.

CheapskateWife

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #64 on: December 10, 2015, 11:38:51 AM »
Its not cheap, but I can buy 18 heads (a 4.5 year supply) for the cost of one cavity filling at my Dentist

I think this is exactly the right way of looking at this.  Oh, and fillings fail eventually.  Best to invest in prevention, so whatever works best for you (no judgment for the dinosaur shaped flossing devices if it saves your teeth)

Kaspian

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #65 on: December 10, 2015, 02:06:26 PM »
Its not cheap, but I can buy 18 heads (a 4.5 year supply) for the cost of one cavity filling at my Dentist

I think this is exactly the right way of looking at this.  Oh, and fillings fail eventually.  Best to invest in prevention, so whatever works best for you (no judgment for the dinosaur shaped flossing devices if it saves your teeth)

I buy my electric toothbrush replacement heads off eBay from China.  Looking at them, I'm convinced they come out of the same damn factory as the name brand ones.  They certainly work just as well.  4 cleaning heads for about $2, as opposed to $25 or something crazy.

MMMaybe

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #66 on: December 11, 2015, 06:05:28 PM »
I have excellent teeth but terrible gums, and switching to Sonicare two years ago has made a visible difference in my dental health to the point where my dental hygienist visits are now a piece of cake. I have been buying generic replacement heads from China from an eBay seller for about three dollar or so a piece, shipping included, and I honestly have no noticeable issue whatsoever with quality. At that price, I can afford to replace the head every few months. The only thing I don't like about the Sonicare brush is that the battery cannot be replaced easily, unless you go for a DIY solution.

Would you mind sharing the name of your ebay seller? I've had some less than good ones so it would be good to try a recommended one!

fitfrugalfab

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #67 on: December 11, 2015, 06:56:32 PM »
I used a regular toothbrush plus flossing and mouthwash for 20 years. My gums started receding and I would get the occasional cavities. I switched to an electronic toothbrush and my dentist was so amazed at the condition of my teeth. My teeth were whiter and gums were healthier and have stopped receding. She asked me what my secret was and  I told her it was a simple toothbrush switch. I don't even floss everyday anymore (although I really need to start up again)

reader2580

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #68 on: December 11, 2015, 08:48:44 PM »
I think I only paid about $35 for my current Oral B toothbrush.  My first Oral B that cost a fair bit more smoked the motor after about 7 or 8 years.

You can get electric toothbrushes that take AA batteries if you don't like rechargables.

csprof

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #69 on: December 11, 2015, 11:25:14 PM »
One thing about me is perfect, and it's my teeth.  Yeah, I couldn't be naturally thin and athletic or have great skin.  Nope, my one big perk had to be something that is expensive but fixable and moderately invisible to other people.  I'd definitely trade my excellent teeth for perfect eyesight.  Regardless, it's genetics.  I was fortunate enough to be born with strong teeth and can't claim that my perfect teeth are a result of any action beyond simple brushing. 

In contrast, my 19 year old takes excellent care of her teeth, but she rarely experiences a cavity-free check up.  She inherited a mouth full of Swiss cheese teeth from her Daddy.  Her needs are greater than mine, and I should investigate buying her one of these Sonic Care tooth brushes.  Since I am still paying her health care costs while she's in college, it might be a money saver for me . . . But better health for her would be the real benefit.

You might suggest that your daughter look into xylitol gum or mints (or swishing a bit of xylitol dissolved in water around a few times a day if you want the budget approach, but I'm lazy, so I just suck on a few mints per day).  The tl;dr is across innumerable, careful studies, regular exposure of your teeth to xylitol (3-6x per day) reduces dental caries by about 30%, or more.  The modern view of cavities is closer to infection management, and xylitol helps reduce the ability of the bacteria that causes the cavities to breed and/or stick to your teeth.

On the OP topic:  My dentist force-converted me to an electric toothbrush.  Not because of plaque - I was doing fine - but because of some gum recession.  AFAICT, it's been effective -- she's stopped making as many worried sounds.  When I researched it, the most typical view from the studies was that an electric is no more effective than a well-trained human doing a proper job of brushing with a manual toothrbush, but the (good) electric toothbrushes are a bit more foolproof to technique errors.

Costco sells the replacement heads, or you can amazon subscribe & save them, to save a bit of the cost.

JJNL

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #70 on: December 12, 2015, 05:22:06 AM »
I'm also an electrical convert. I bought mine just after getting an implant - it was my front right tooth, so very much in view, and horribly expensive (the whole procedure cost me a couple of 1000s of euros easily, it is THE most expensive and finicky place to get an implant). Implants only work well if you take care of your gums, and I was having some gum problems before. I really didn't want to need a new implant / work on the implant any sooner than absolutely necessary, so I chose to invest in prevention. Including a toothbrush upgrade and more expensive toothpaste (the kind that is better for your gums). I haven't looked back since: my gum problems have decreased markedly and my teeth feel a lot cleaner. I do tend to use the brush heads for a lot longer than 1 month - that saves a bit of money.

warmastoast

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #71 on: December 12, 2015, 06:28:27 PM »
+1 for xylitol.  Works very well at reducing caries/cavities provided you take about 6g a day spread throughout the day and don't eat/drink sugary drinks/foods at the same time. Xlear make some good xylitol-only candies and gums but personally, I'd buy a large bag of xylitol sugar and use that instead of sugar in normal cooking.  A teaspoon or two of xylitol dissolved in a bottle of water or glass of water is a very cheap way of getting towards the dosage required.
Xylitol will also help with any gum inflammation.
Don't let the dog get near it as it's really bad for them.

Electric toothbrushes,  I'm with the other dental posters on this one- not necessary at all. Use disclosing tablets and you'll soon get your toothbrushing technique sorted out.   FLOSS!!  FLOSS!!  Did I say FLOSS???  You'll thank us when you're older.....


Kaspian

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #72 on: December 14, 2015, 11:55:38 AM »
Would you mind sharing the name of your ebay seller? I've had some less than good ones so it would be good to try a recommended one!

This vendor has proved reliable for me:  http://stores.ebay.com/The-Alice-fairy-tooth

yyc-phil

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Re: Electric toothbrushes, consumerist or a good thing?
« Reply #73 on: December 14, 2015, 01:07:01 PM »
I have excellent teeth but terrible gums, and switching to Sonicare two years ago has made a visible difference in my dental health to the point where my dental hygienist visits are now a piece of cake. I have been buying generic replacement heads from China from an eBay seller for about three dollar or so a piece, shipping included, and I honestly have no noticeable issue whatsoever with quality. At that price, I can afford to replace the head every few months. The only thing I don't like about the Sonicare brush is that the battery cannot be replaced easily, unless you go for a DIY solution.

Would you mind sharing the name of your ebay seller? I've had some less than good ones so it would be good to try a recommended one!

I ordered 2 last January from this seller to try, and they ended up being very good, and I meant to reorder from that seller but forgot. Even after 6 months of use, the head I replaced in July is still good. I re-ordered a month ago and just received the package at home (I work away from home for extended periods) and will replace the head when I get back home at the end of the week. Hopefully the quality hasn't changed.

http://feedback.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewFeedback2&userid=eawakening&ftab=AllFeedback
« Last Edit: December 14, 2015, 01:09:50 PM by ykphil »