Author Topic: Egg-cellent advice requested  (Read 3937 times)

oneday

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Egg-cellent advice requested
« on: December 27, 2018, 10:37:05 PM »
Scrambling eggs is one of the few culinary skills I possess.  Plus I totally love eggs.  

The problem is my pan.  It's a worn-out teflon pan that's bowed up in the middle, so the eggs run down around the edges.  And I heard teflon is bad for the environment.  Plus this particular pan is no longer non-stick, so not sure how much longer I'll be able to use it to cook, as it is so hard to clean the eggs off.

Someone was telling me about a copper pan, but then said it was coated with ceramic inside, so not sure how the copper provides a benefit.  Plus, it seems a little gimicky.  Is it?

Is there another option for non-stick pans?  I've tried to figure some of this out myself, but as a novice chef, it's confusing & overwhelming.

PS - I'm not currently able to use oil/fat in cooking due to dietary restrictions.

gooki

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2018, 11:02:23 PM »
Cast iron would be perfect if preseasoning with oil is acceptable for your diet.

Othwise thereís always the microwave.

oneday

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2018, 12:34:26 AM »
Cast iron would be perfect if preseasoning with oil is acceptable for your diet.

Othwise thereís always the microwave.

I am learning that I am one of *those* people.  Because I can't eat microwave eggs. 

How much oil is used in the preseasoning of cast iron?

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2018, 03:21:02 AM »
There's no restaurant in the world that uses teflon pans. Get some decent cookware and learn how to use it properly.

Dollar Slice

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2018, 03:35:36 AM »
Someone was telling me about a copper pan, but then said it was coated with ceramic inside, so not sure how the copper provides a benefit.  Plus, it seems a little gimicky.  Is it?

You can get ceramic-coated pans of any type (cast iron, copper, aluminum etc.). You could get something cheaper like stainless or cast iron with a ceramic coating - the copper won't make much difference for something like scrambled eggs. That said, I haven't tried a ceramic pan, so I can't say if it would definitely work for you!

Do you like hard-boiled eggs? That would be a lot easier to do with no oil/fat. You can also bake eggs in the oven.

Cranky

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2018, 06:12:08 AM »
I think the ceramic coated pans are great for eggs, and if you only use it for eggs and donít scratch it up, it will last a long, long time.

nereo

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2018, 06:53:43 AM »

How much oil is used in the preseasoning of cast iron?

Each time you season a cast-iron pan you need about a teaspoon of oil or so.  Done correctly, it doesn't get into your food, but rather it bonds to the metal to form a non-stick patina. After each seasoning you can wipe the pan with a paper towel and there shouldn't be any oil left on the pan.

When you have a new cast iron pan I'd recommend seasoning it almost every use for the first few dozen uses, then every week or so.

There's a few ways of seasoning - most durable is to rub the surface with a fine film of oil and then put the pan into a hot oven for a half hour or so.  Far quicker is to simply heat a lightly oiled pan over a burner until it just starts to smoke (takes 2-3 minutes).

Agree with other posters to abandon teflon coated pans entirely.  The key to having your eggs not stick is to have a hot (but not scaldingly hot) pan free from nicks and scratches, and then to NOT poke the eggs for the first 30-45 seconds while the bottom sets.  This is even more important if you use no fat in the pan.  If your diet allows it, a trace amount of spray oil (which adds maybe 1/4 teaspoon) will make cooking a lot easier.  As eggs have lipids (fat) in them I can't see a reason not to use at least a little oil when cooking.  As Dollar Slice said, the oven (preferably the broiler) is another option.

Mgmny

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2018, 10:52:46 AM »
I think the ceramic coated pans are great for eggs, and if you only use it for eggs and donít scratch it up, it will last a long, long time.

+1

I only use stainless steel cookware and cast iron cookware EXCEPT for eggs. I have a GreenPan brand ceramic pan that i literally only use to cook eggs on.

BE DELICATE with this pan. I never use metal utensils on it, and i always cook at lower temps so not to burn things on it. I baby this pan. I do not baby my SS or CI cookware.

frugaliknowit

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2018, 11:49:55 AM »
I use cooking spray with a ~20 year old, very tough stainless pan. 

I spray the pan, then let it get quite hot before dumping the eggs in it.  Once the eggs are seriously cooking, I cut the heat down to about medium (electric...with gas you need to be more conservative with the heat...). 

TrMama

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2018, 11:57:18 AM »
We have a couple of those ceramic coated pans. They are indeed pretty non-stick and last way longer than teflon coated pans. However, I still use about 1/2 teaspoon of oil in mine when I make scrambled eggs.

If you really want a completely non-stick surface and don't want to use any oil at all, I'd go with eggs cooked in a silicone muffin pan in the oven. They'll be like tiny, crustless quiches. Make sure you put the muffin pan on a cookie sheet, or something solid since the silicone molds tend to be floppy.

HipGnosis

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2018, 10:37:54 PM »

I am learning that I am one of *those* people.  Because I can't eat microwave eggs. 
Have you tried a good microwave egg cooker?  I got an OXO, Good Grips Microwave Egg Cooker on recommendation of someone on here, and I'm truly impressed with it.   You do need to learn how long your microwave takes and use a small spray of cooking spray.

oneday

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2018, 04:26:49 PM »
There's no restaurant in the world that uses teflon pans. Get some decent cookware and learn how to use it properly.

Do you have some advice on what decent cookware is?  I am here for your suggestions on that topic!

Someone was telling me about a copper pan, but then said it was coated with ceramic inside, so not sure how the copper provides a benefit.  Plus, it seems a little gimicky.  Is it?

You can get ceramic-coated pans of any type (cast iron, copper, aluminum etc.). You could get something cheaper like stainless or cast iron with a ceramic coating - the copper won't make much difference for something like scrambled eggs. That said, I haven't tried a ceramic pan, so I can't say if it would definitely work for you!

Do you like hard-boiled eggs? That would be a lot easier to do with no oil/fat. You can also bake eggs in the oven.

Hard boiled - good call!  I do like those, so can do those sometimes.   I really like to scramble them now & again, so I can put the veggies in for a more interesting egg meal.

I will look into oven-baked eggs, too.  Seems like that way I could maybe cook up a bunch at once.


How much oil is used in the preseasoning of cast iron?

Each time you season a cast-iron pan you need about a teaspoon of oil or so.  Done correctly, it doesn't get into your food, but rather it bonds to the metal to form a non-stick patina. After each seasoning you can wipe the pan with a paper towel and there shouldn't be any oil left on the pan.

When you have a new cast iron pan I'd recommend seasoning it almost every use for the first few dozen uses, then every week or so.

There's a few ways of seasoning - most durable is to rub the surface with a fine film of oil and then put the pan into a hot oven for a half hour or so.  Far quicker is to simply heat a lightly oiled pan over a burner until it just starts to smoke (takes 2-3 minutes).

Agree with other posters to abandon teflon coated pans entirely.  The key to having your eggs not stick is to have a hot (but not scaldingly hot) pan free from nicks and scratches, and then to NOT poke the eggs for the first 30-45 seconds while the bottom sets.  This is even more important if you use no fat in the pan.  If your diet allows it, a trace amount of spray oil (which adds maybe 1/4 teaspoon) will make cooking a lot easier.  As eggs have lipids (fat) in them I can't see a reason not to use at least a little oil when cooking.  As Dollar Slice said, the oven (preferably the broiler) is another option.

Thanks for the additional info on cast iron.  I looked at a few how to season videos and it looks easy and even if the oil gets in the food, the amount would be negligible.  For the time being, I am on a very low fat diet, but it's not a no-fat diet, so that would be OK.  Currently I get my day's allowance of fat from the yolk of one egg.  I add two more egg whites to that to make up the meal.

I didn't choose the teflon pan.  Mr. X gave it to me when we split up the kitchen.  It was near the end of it's life anyway; when I last scrubbed it, some of the teflon came off, so it's now in the trash.  Last night I used a steel pot to make my scramble!  That has been my only pan; now I am pan-less (better than pants-less) and looking to optimize the replacement process.

Additional tips on scrambling are appreciated, too!  I may try a hotter pan/pot next time.

I think the ceramic coated pans are great for eggs, and if you only use it for eggs and donít scratch it up, it will last a long, long time.

I think the ceramic coated pans are great for eggs, and if you only use it for eggs and donít scratch it up, it will last a long, long time.

+1

I only use stainless steel cookware and cast iron cookware EXCEPT for eggs. I have a GreenPan brand ceramic pan that i literally only use to cook eggs on.

BE DELICATE with this pan. I never use metal utensils on it, and i always cook at lower temps so not to burn things on it. I baby this pan. I do not baby my SS or CI cookware.

What I'm taking away from this is that the ceramic is more delicate than cast iron, but less maintenance (no seasoning).  I am capable of taking extraordinary care with my possessions, but I'm not there yet with my cooking implements.  I burned up the same pan twice in the last two weeks while steaming veggies.  You would think I learned after the first time, but I guess I have a thick skull.  My skill and motivation is not there yet.

I use cooking spray with a ~20 year old, very tough stainless pan. 

I spray the pan, then let it get quite hot before dumping the eggs in it.  Once the eggs are seriously cooking, I cut the heat down to about medium (electric...with gas you need to be more conservative with the heat...). 

Another option, thanks.

We have a couple of those ceramic coated pans. They are indeed pretty non-stick and last way longer than teflon coated pans. However, I still use about 1/2 teaspoon of oil in mine when I make scrambled eggs.

If you really want a completely non-stick surface and don't want to use any oil at all, I'd go with eggs cooked in a silicone muffin pan in the oven. They'll be like tiny, crustless quiches. Make sure you put the muffin pan on a cookie sheet, or something solid since the silicone molds tend to be floppy.

Ooh, that wasn't even on my radar!


I am learning that I am one of *those* people.  Because I can't eat microwave eggs. 
Have you tried a good microwave egg cooker?  I got an OXO, Good Grips Microwave Egg Cooker on recommendation of someone on here, and I'm truly impressed with it.   You do need to learn how long your microwave takes and use a small spray of cooking spray.

I looked it up and I'm not sure how it makes the eggs taste any better, but it is at least an option.



Options in order of appearance:

-cast iron
-microwave (with special doohickey)
-ceramic (legitimized)
-hard boiled instead
-baked instead
-improved cooking method
-broiled instead
-stainless with oil or cooking spray
-silicone muffin pan in oven

OK, I know I said I can scramble eggs, but I think there's probably room for improvement based on some comments on this thread.

Thanks all, this is a good list and I'll see what I can find at the thrift shop as a first try.  Worst case scenario is I will have to buy a can of cooking spray to use with my steel pot, while waiting for a good deal or thrifting find to show up.

HipGnosis

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2018, 10:58:03 AM »
If you don't care that they don't look like conventional hard boiled eggs; you can make easy boiled eggs in a muffin pan, in the oven.
Put about a tablespoon of simmering water into ea 'tin'/cup (that you will put an egg into). 
Then crack the egg into the tins and bake.
It saves you from cracking and peeling the egg when it's done.
Awesome for egg salad.

oneday

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2018, 11:06:14 AM »
If you don't care that they don't look like conventional hard boiled eggs; you can make easy boiled eggs in a muffin pan, in the oven.
Put about a tablespoon of simmering water into ea 'tin'/cup (that you will put an egg into). 
Then crack the egg into the tins and bake.
It saves you from cracking and peeling the egg when it's done.
Awesome for egg salad.

I will have to try this!



Thrift trip yesterday was successful.  I found a 12" Orgreenic ceramic pan, $22 on Amazon for $9 at the thrift store.  Overkill for 3 eggs, but at least I have a pan now!  Worked well (thanks for the cooking tips @nereo and @frugaliknowit I think a hotter burner helped taste wise) and cleaned up like a dream!

I will keep looking for something smaller, too.

SquashingDebt

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2018, 05:17:20 PM »
Poached eggs are another option.

OzzieandHarriet

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2018, 06:32:18 PM »
I like our T-Fal pan. I guess itís some sort of Teflon, but itís high quality. Weíve had it for 20 years and itís still in good shape. Always use a soft utensil (plastic, wood, etc.), never sharp metal, to cook with it.

ltt

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2018, 07:15:43 PM »
I think the ceramic coated pans are great for eggs, and if you only use it for eggs and donít scratch it up, it will last a long, long time.

This.  We've had this discussion in our home now over the course of a few months.  We now have a dedicated pan and 2 dedicated plastic spatulas specifically for eggs---nothing else will be used in the pan.  The pan and spatulas now have their own dedicated drawer in the kitchen.  And no Pam spray because evidently when it heats up it will start to discolor the pan, so only oil.

crazy jane

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2018, 08:21:47 PM »

mountain mustache

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2018, 10:07:14 PM »
cast iron all the way. I have 3 pans. One for eggs (it's the oldest, and most "non stick"), one for meat things (steak, burgers, etc), and one for non-egg big things (stir fries, etc). Since you never really "wash" cast iron, I don't like to mix foods too much. They really are the best, though, and last forever. One of my pans was my mom's that she got as a wedding present 45 years ago...it's the best, and the only one I make eggs in. The seasoning process after each use literally takes only about 2 min. I love how sturdy the pans are, I can use metal cooking utensils, and scrape away and nothing happens to the pan. I could never use a pan with coatings that I might damage, I'm honestly just not careful enough...and I love metal spatulas.

big_owl

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2018, 08:35:05 AM »
I have a mini 6Ē cast iron pan that is use for making all my eggs, scrambled or otherwise.  I donít bother seasoning it or anything else.  I donít even put olive oil in it first.  I also rinse it after every use.  For whatever reason I never have any issues with eggs sticking, over easy eggs will literally just pour out of the pan. 

We also have a set of copper pots and pans. They are gorgeous and I find they give me a better finish when cooking steaks and carmelizing things.  You do have to use wooden utensils with them to avoid scratching though. 

I do have a big cast iron pan that I use for general purpose cooking.  I like the copper cookwear for searing meats more though.  Itís a lot easier to control the temp with copper too. 

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #20 on: December 31, 2018, 01:25:05 PM »
I have a Calphalon omelet pan that works for scrambling eggs without oil. The first one lasted 14 years, then the eggs started sticking and I replaced it.

I don't love my cast iron pan for scrambling eggs.

BrightFIRE

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2019, 02:49:29 PM »
Consider the frittata - it starts as scrambled eggs that you add veggies/meat/cheese to and then you finish it in the skillet in the oven. Served in wedges, either hot or room temp.

I really like to scramble them now & again, so I can put the veggies in for a more interesting egg meal.

I will look into oven-baked eggs, too.  Seems like that way I could maybe cook up a bunch at once.

Telecaster

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2019, 03:23:24 PM »
Another vote for cast iron.   One thing to think about is the modern cast iron pans, while inexpensive, are sand cast, which leaves a pebbly surface.   Old school cast iron pans have a perfectly smooth cooking surface, which makes them even better from the non-stick aspect.   The old school pans are available on eBay and such, but cost more than new pans.  It is kind of cool though, that those old pans last literally several generations. 

There are a couple companies who make cast iron pans in the old style.  Finex is brand, but the pans are considerably more expensive than a regular cast iron or a typical frying pan.

That said, I own a Finex and it was worth every last penny.  I cook most days, so it is worth it to me to have quality tools, and the Finex cast iron is the easily best pan I've ever used period.   It is virtually non-stick (as good as an older non-stick pan), heats much more evenly than a non-stick, and vastly more versatile.   

nereo

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2019, 04:54:27 PM »
Damn you @Telecaster! Finex wasn't even on my radar - now it is.  I actually overheard someone at my independent supply store mentioning it to another customer but I didn't pay any attention. Now I kinda want one.  Damn you!!

Telecaster

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2019, 10:26:47 PM »
You are cursing me now.  You will be praising me later

This is not my first rodeo. 

oneday

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2019, 10:14:48 PM »
Consider the frittata - it starts as scrambled eggs that you add veggies/meat/cheese to and then you finish it in the skillet in the oven. Served in wedges, either hot or room temp.

I really like to scramble them now & again, so I can put the veggies in for a more interesting egg meal.

I will look into oven-baked eggs, too.  Seems like that way I could maybe cook up a bunch at once.

I do like this idea! I could maybe do up a batch ahead of time. I don't like the taste of reheated scrambled eggs, but this might be OK.

Damn you @Telecaster! Finex wasn't even on my radar - now it is.  I actually overheard someone at my independent supply store mentioning it to another customer but I didn't pay any attention. Now I kinda want one.  Damn you!!

Not looking, not looking, not looking...

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2019, 09:23:40 AM »
I also do not like reheated scrambled eggs but I do like a slice of quiche. Have never made frittata.

Slow2FIRE

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2019, 06:09:21 PM »
Since you only cook scrambled eggs, you can really get away with stainless steel.  Cast iron would be better.  A non-stick ceramic or anodized pan would work too.  I prefer to get the ones with a 10yr+ warranty and try to get a warranty claim when the pan finally wears out (and I only really use non stick for eggs).

Stainless Steel -> easiest way is to use a canned cooking spray.  pouring oil or using a misto won't quite work (ime) for keeping the eggs from sticking.  You can even cook eggs over easy this way (alternatively, some people basically "deep fry" their eggs in a stainless pan with a lot of oil - I don't prefer my eggs that way at all).

Cast iron -> scrambled is fine, but I've never been able to season my pan well enough to cook eggs over easy in a cast iron pan (never tried cooking spray on cast iron, which may be the key).

Non -stick ->
....ceramic - I've had so-so results with "green pan" and one other I tried.  Coating became sticky for eggs over easy far too quickly.
....anodized - I've had good results with these types using just a misto for a light coating of oil to make perfect eggs over easy with zero crunchy/brown/hard outer edges (I like my eggs over easy to be perfectly white all the way across).

faithless

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Re: Egg-cellent advice requested
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2019, 02:02:19 AM »
Slightly O/T, but another vote for mini fritattas:

Eggs baked in a silicone muffin tin with bits of 'fridge gravel' - i.e. whatever's going. You can add bits of ham, veg like peppers or peas or sweetcorn, sliced spring onions. I always add a couple of cracks of black pepper and some dried herbs as they can be a bit bland. They keep for a couple of days in the fridge, put kitchen roll under them as the bottoms can get a bit soggy otherwise. Eat warm from oven or cold with salad.