Author Topic: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?  (Read 13638 times)

lifejoy

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I have $5,500 in student loans with a 3% interest rate.

I'm trying to throw all my money at my loans, but I am still always wanting things I don't need. What do you tell yourself to help resist? These are my ideas, but I'd love to hear yours!

- Do I NEED it?
- Will I still want/love it in a year?
- Have I got something like it already?
- Would buying it feel better than being debt free?

Let's hear your ideas! And if a thread like this already exists, kindly point me in the right direction. Many thanks :)

footenote

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Visualization might help. Imagine (or maybe even mock up) holding your student loan statement with a zero balance.

Then compare how that will feel with the feeling of owning the object you're currently (kinda) wanting.

Numbers Man

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It depends on how long you want to be a slave to your lender. $5,500 should be easy to knock out with in a year.

Dee18

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The 30 day list works best for me. I don't buy it unless I still want it 30 days later.  And if I do still want it, then I ask the questions you have thought of, along with Will it require maintenance?  and Where will I store it?

rugorak

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Ultimately I think there is no one size fits all answer. Some people are natural savers, other natural spenders. For myself it usually isn't a problem because I prefer larger things when I do want to buy things. Even as I kid I saved for 2 years for a pair of skis. But there is still some temptation from time to time. Your questions are great and I find myself doing the same thing.

I also set aside some fun money in my budget each month. This is money you won't worry about tracking where it goes. It is for things that you find fun as they come up. So if some friends from work ask you to go out on a Friday for dinner or whatever you can accept (as long as it isn't all the time). Or you can buy something little that you want from time to time that you don't need. This way you don't get resistance fatigue. But you do so in a responsible matter that still allows you to reach your larger goals.


SavingMon(k)ey

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Where will I store it?
THAT, right there, is the question I need to remember to ask myself more often, as I hate clutter but still produce it.

pop pop!

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I will echo the poster who waits 30 days.  It doesn't have to be 30 days, could just be a week.  99% of the time delaying a purchase will result in you not really wanting it anymore.

ChiStache

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Maybe it might make sense to look into why you want the things? Are those wants coming from any particular source? TV? A spendy friend showing off? Blogs you read?

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Avoiding temptation is one of my major methods. Another is to constantly remind myself of my goals. If it helps you, you might reward yourself by sending off a check to your loans every time you resist a purchase.

I also try to be really aware of Needs vs Wants. I bought a pair of sunglasses today from Target because my daughter broke my other pair. I had gone a bit without them, but driving would get a little dangerous and walks on the beach were sometimes unpleasant. Sunglasses became a Need. I only needed a simple pair though so Target worked well. on the other hand, while walking around the shopping center, I didn't buy a pastry from Panera. I was a little hungry and needed to kill a little time. Still I Want a healthier body and more savings more than a pastry. This was an unnecessary Want.

galaxie

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I remind myself that there will be another sale and someone will still be selling that thing I want when I have saved up the "fun money" to buy it. 

travelbug

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Do a massive cull of everything you own. I swear you will never want to buy another thing again.

But I am a list writer, and often I forget about stuff I really wanted after a month or so.

If something stays on the list for 6-12 months I usually ask for it for my birthday or Christmas. I am also of the mind that I would rather own less, but own quality, than a whole heap of crap that I don't truly love.

Otherwise I visualise how many hours I would have to work (using net pay) for an item and then calculate if I invested that much, or in your case paid off the debt, how much money you would save longterm and how much closer that would bring you to FI.

The $165pa you are paying in interest on your debt would be enough incentive to me to go without everything unessential until I was debt free.

Good luck.

ender

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3% is pretty low so this might not be as convincing, but you effectively are financing any purchase you make at 3% until your student loans are paid off.

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Some things that have helped me: 

I track every penny of income (even the coins I find on the street!) and every penny of expense.  Just having to enter every purchase into my spreadsheet is a deterrent to spending.

I do not do clown car driving.  I might have a tote bag or a small backpack with me when I am out doing errands (on my bike or on foot).  I find that this is also a deterrent to spending, as I literally don't have the room for the item(s) in my bag/back.

I also make myself wait.  Maybe it's 5 minutes, maybe 5 days, maybe 5 months.  Often, after waiting, I feel so good about not having bought the item on an impulse that I no longer want to buy it all!

I also think the 1-in-1-out strategy is a good one.  It forces you to think, "OK, if I buy this, what am I willing to get rid of?"

I also live in a small (about 650 sq ft) house, so I don't have much (any?) extra space.

Russ

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Do a massive cull of everything you own. I swear you will never want to buy another thing again.

+1. I just moved, so I had to pack every single thing I own. Realization: I have way too much shit. Probably not gonna want to buy anything for a couple of months

oldtoyota

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I tell myself to wait. Six months maybe. By then, I don't want the thing.

Kira

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Tell yourself you'll buy it with the next paycheck (if it's relatively small).. odds are you'll have forgotten all about it by then.

Mostly I think about which I want more.. whether I want to have this object or whether I want to have no debt.

And I think about all the crap I already have in my house and hyperventilate a little.

Lentils5eva

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I also set aside some fun money in my budget each month. This is money you won't worry about tracking where it goes. It is for things that you find fun as they come up. So if some friends from work ask you to go out on a Friday for dinner or whatever you can accept (as long as it isn't all the time). Or you can buy something little that you want from time to time that you don't need. This way you don't get resistance fatigue. But you do so in a responsible matter that still allows you to reach your larger goals.

Having a little cushion in your budget makes being disciplined about saving money not feel like chore and reduces decision fatigue as well.  You have a limited supply of willpower, like most human beings.  If you feel like there is room to be forgiving of yourself for occasional things you want, but don't need, it will be more sustainable in the long run to live below your means.  Just avoid spending more than that "fun budget" or promising to pay it off later. 

Like ChiStache says, it can also help to analyze what you're seeing that makes you want things.  I stopped going on Pinterest and unsubscribed to emails from stores that had merchandise I would always be tempted to buy, like Anthropologie and that has actually helped more than I thought it would.

penny

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When I used to like to buy things, I discovered that it was the "shopping" and seeking that I enjoyed, not necessarily the purchasing. I've found that online shopping can be great for this. Of course it needs a little  discipline, but I got to the point that I would search around for hours for great deals and things that I "loved", and then keep them in the cart. I would then give myself full permission to purchase  if I committed to sleep on it.  Very rarely after a good sleep do you want something desperately, and this includes fashion and iphones.  It's just as easy to talk yourself out of something as into. By searching but not buying the item, this satiated the old "gatherer" theory, and made me feel awesome for not making impulse decisions. I rarely would buy things with this method, and now I don't even think about it. Despite my aversion to stuff, I find every once in awhile I'll binge shop a Patagonia sale,  and just not click "pay now" and it gives an even better rush.

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Shopping/buying can be an addiction as much as anything else, so as well as just trying to stop yourself, can you change your habits so that you aren't even presented the opportunity in the first place?  In my case, I have a bad habit of going out to buy a cookie or frozen yogurt sometimes in the afternoons at work.  This is not the end of the world if it's occasional, but recently I realized I was going out a few times a week--ridiculous!  I've actually now stopped bringing my wallet to work, so that I just can't go out and buy anything.  Maybe you could figure out something like that if there's a specific buying urge you have a problem with?

Will

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I would recommend two things:

1) Poke around some on www.whatsthecost.com     You can plug in numbers in different calculators and see what your loans are costing you.  I know the snowballing calculator really helped open my eyes.

2)  I am really liking this philosophy and am going to try to keep it in mind: 
"Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful."

FiveSigmas

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Lots of good thoughts on this thread. I also find remembering the last time I felt "buyer's remorse" helps. As soon as I enter that emotional state, my desire for the hot new gadget (my weakness) eases up.

lifejoy

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My goodness, what a bunch of great ideas! I'm definitely going to bookmark and re-read this thread every time I'm feeling tempted!

The object I am currently coveting is a ring (won't take up much space!) that I do not need but really love. And it's on etsy - so it likely won't be there in six months. BUT, I love these ideas, and it's helping me resist! There will always be more rings :)

PS - it's gold and from 1920 and $200... A bit steep but in my mind a "good value". But I can wait.

gooki

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Replace buying shit with making shit.

Gerard

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"What will I give away or sell to make room for this item?"

ThatsMyOtter

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My biggest weakness right now is stuff that will make my apartment feel "finished" like artwork, slipcovers for our hand-me-down couches that are fully functional but really boring, etc. If it will make my home more functional, it can come out of our getting started budget. (DH and I got married last year and included a line in our budget for things like furniture, an iron and ironing board. That line item expires after we've been married 18 months and then becomes additional savings.) If it won't make the home more functional I go for a walk/bike ride (or grab a book if the weather is bad).

I also ask myself if X is important enough that I'd start a side gig to get it. So far the answer has always been no.

Catbert

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Avoid shopping opportunities whatever those weaknesses are for you:  go to the grocery store rather than Target if lots of extras end up in your basket there; don't cruise Etsy or other shopping sites just to kill time; don't go to the mall with your GF just to have something to do, etc.


SavingMon(k)ey

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Do a massive cull of everything you own. I swear you will never want to buy another thing again.

+1. I just moved, so I had to pack every single thing I own. Realization: I have way too much shit. Probably not gonna want to buy anything for a couple of months
Same here. I got rid of a lot of stuff right before the move, and still felt weighed down by too much stuff.

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I used to have a tendency to buy things that I call "aspirational purchases".  I think that if I own X, then it will change who I am or what I do.  The worst example is probably exercise equipment.  Lots of people buy it thinking that they will exercise, but if they don't enjoy exercise/make it a priority to begin with, the ownership of the Ab3000 Deluxe machine is not going to change that.  Likewise, a purse won't make me look like a supermodel.  An SUV won't make me a sporty and rugged.  Jewellery won't make me glamorous.  A gift for my spouse or son won't make them love me more.  Expensive wine won't make me sophisticated.  Some stupid watch won't turn me into James Bond.  Etc.

So, my question is often, "Why do I really want this?  Can I get what I really want without buying this item?"  I often find I don't want it for itself, but for something it symbolizes (often falsely) to me.

No Name Guy

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Quote
I'm trying to throw all my money at my loans, but I am still always wanting things I don't need.

Quote
The object I am currently coveting is a ring (won't take up much space!) that I do not need but really love. And it's on etsy - so it likely won't be there in six months. BUT, I love these ideas, and it's helping me resist! There will always be more rings :)

PS - it's gold and from 1920 and $200... A bit steep but in my mind a "good value". But I can wait.

As one of the other posters said, avoid those areas that will tempt you.  Why are you looking on Etsy in the first place?  Stop going there - there is nothing you NEED on Etsy (need = basic food, basic clothing, shelter, clean water).  For that matter, stop going to any place that you find the stuff that you are wanting, that you, in your own words, don't need.  Avoid media in all forms, since it's nothing but advertising for "buy me" and "your life is crap without buying this piece of crap".

Check out the book "Willpower" by Roy F. Baumeister from your local library, and read it.  Avoiding temptation is one strategy to enhance or save your willpower for when you'll really need it.  The very act of you having to resist that ring, by going onto Etsy in the first place, puts you at greater risk for failing the next time your desire for financial freedom comes up against some cute bauble that will set you back dozens to hundreds of dollars since you've depleted your "stock" of willpower resisting the ring.  Do you think it would be wise for alcoholics go to a bar to have a soda?  Nope - those that wish to be sober should stay out of bars.  Same thing when it comes to spending money - avoid places that allow or encourage you to engage in self destructive behavior.

More fundamentally, ask yourself this:  What do you want?  What do you REALLY want?  Do you want the ring and this other piece of clutter, and that piece of "gotta have it", which, in your own words, you don't need, or financial freedom?  Temptation is easy (for me) to avoid when there is a clear cut, unambiguous list of priorities AND you put your resources into fulfilling your top priorities (and if I'm out of resources, the lower priority items don't get any, period).  I'd rather be ER / FI / IW than to have a bigger house, newer car, or a nice new Makita compound miter sliding chop saw - as a result, I save and invest, instead of spending on those items.

So, I'd ask (or you should ask yourself):  Do you want to be $200 further out of debt, or do you want the ring?  Those, fundamentally, are your choices.  Act on them - buy the ring, or send the $200 extra off to pay down the debt.


travelbug

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My goodness, what a bunch of great ideas! I'm definitely going to bookmark and re-read this thread every time I'm feeling tempted!

The object I am currently coveting is a ring (won't take up much space!) that I do not need but really love. And it's on etsy - so it likely won't be there in six months. BUT, I love these ideas, and it's helping me resist! There will always be more rings :)

PS - it's gold and from 1920 and $200... A bit steep but in my mind a "good value". But I can wait.

I purposely do not go on etsy AT ALL anymore, I went through a stage where I bought all sorts of lovely things on there. A ring is something lovely that I am sure you could ask someone to buy for you for Christmas or a birthday perhaps.

That said, figure out what you love about that particular ring style and I am sure there will be others along the way even better. I often have the mentality that is I am meant to have something it will be there when I can afford it/ for my birthday etc.

Otherwise it was not meant to be and I assure myself that a better one will come along.


chardog

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Some good ways to avoid buying things.

Drive less or not at all and ride a bike instead.  It's healthier and a lot harder to go buy a bunch of crap if you are on your bicycle.

Avoid TV, internet and other forms of advertising.

Avoid malls and other stores.

Oscar_C

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I also set aside some fun money in my budget each month. This is money you won't worry about tracking where it goes. It is for things that you find fun as they come up.

This way you don't get resistance fatigue. But you do so in a responsible matter that still allows you to reach your larger goals.

I use this method, and believe me it works. I tend to micromanage my budget so I have a daily amount I am able to spend on whatever. Anything left over at me next payday gets sent to savings.

Rangifer

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Visualization might help. Imagine (or maybe even mock up) holding your student loan statement with a zero balance.

Then compare how that will feel with the feeling of owning the object you're currently (kinda) wanting.

Visualization definitely helps. If you're using Mint (and if you're not sign up!), you can make something like this your desktop wallpaper.

http://imgur.com/5wr7X6e

PS. It isn't my account.

« Last Edit: August 29, 2013, 01:15:26 AM by Rangifer »

lifejoy

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Man, you guys are good! Keep the ideas coming, it's really helping!

Too often I subscribe to Oscar Wilde's way of thinking: "The easiest way to get rid of temptation is to yield to it." Ha! Oh Mr. Wilde. A little hedonic adaptation, me thinks.

wing117

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Do a massive cull of everything you own. I swear you will never want to buy another thing again.

+1. I just moved, so I had to pack every single thing I own. Realization: I have way too much shit. Probably not gonna want to buy anything for a couple of months
Same here. I got rid of a lot of stuff right before the move, and still felt weighed down by too much stuff.

+1 again. I actually cull (or spring cleaning!) every 3-6 months to whittle down more and more. We are down to 5 boxes:

1x Books (I have no book shelves! Ah!)
1x Holiday Decorations
1x Camping/Survival Equipment
2x Winter Clothes/Summer Clothes (depending on the season)

Everything else is used daily, weekly or monthly. We are getting down to having zero junk in the house. Everything has 1 or more purposes.

The other thing I did that helped IMMENSELY in my spending is I drew up a diagram of hobbies and interests and then defined 3 core hobbies and 3 interests.

Hobbies are:
Camping
Cycling
Cooking

Interests are:
Video Games
Wood working
Drinking fine liquor (single malt scotch for those interested)

Hobbies I can outfit myself for - these are core things I do to make myself happy. These are the things I can actually spend money on (No more than 150/mo on everything, rolling over each month). For me, this means I can spend to get a floor pump, grips, new pedals, better tires, cycling clothing, camp clothing, camping equipment, cooking utensils (I need a mesh strainer soon!), etc... I am actually at the point where I'm spending $0 on cycling and camping and have very little I need for cooking (~30 dollars on my to-get list), so the 150/mo will just roll over into my savings.

Interests I can only spend 25/mo on, rolling over. This means if I want a fine ass bottle of Lagavulin 16 year old single malt scotch ($100), I have to save for 4 months (luckily a bottle like this lasts ~8 months). A 60 dollar video game is 2.5 months. Want to get some nice cherry planks for a project? 1-3 months. I'm still getting what I need for my interests, but I think a lot harder about EXACTLY what I'm doing and buying.

If it is not in my interest or hobby list, I don't spend money on it. It takes some self discipline, but has been incredibly helpful in focusing my spending and budgeting.

DoubleDown

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Buy the ring with what? I recommend repeatedly reminding yourself, "I cannot afford this ring. I have NO money." This is the message of MMM's "your hair is on fire debt emergency" philosophy.

As long as you are carrying debt, you cannot afford any unnecessary purchases. You are contemplating increasing your debt to buy something you don't have the money to purchase, digging the hole even deeper (otherwise, if you had the money, you would first pay off that debt). Only after the debt is gone, and you've built up some net worth, THEN you can consider if you still want to spend money on a luxury like this. But until then, you simply don't have the money to buy it.

Good luck!

galliver

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Lots of good suggestions! I'm definitely a 'procrastinator' in shopping.  I've been putting off getting a new computer for like 2 years (my laptop still runs, but I question its reliability sometimes, the poor 5yo thing). Also, without a car I often find it hard to buy something, so I don't. :)

One more thing I wanted to add, though, was that sometimes, the wanting feels better than the having. I realized this at a museum gift shop this summer. I was looking at these wire tree/gemstone decorations that were very pretty and I really wanted one. And then I thought about actually getting it, and realized it wouldn't really make me that happy to have it. And then I realized I had this reaction to a lot of things, but sometimes I didn't realize it. So now when I want something, I ask myself "do I like the thing or do I like wanting it?"

Another adaptation, which won't quite stop the spending, is if I see something that is really cool and/or a good deal and/or makes me think of someone, I get it for them for the next gift-occasion, e.g. birthday or Christmas. I'd spend the money on gifts anyway, but by getting them when the occasion presents, I can make sure it's better spent. Not quite applicable to a $200 ring, though.

lifejoy

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #37 on: September 01, 2013, 11:00:42 PM »
galliver - SUCH a good point! "the wanting feels better than the having"

If I try to imagine owning the item already, I feel a sense of calm - as though the urgency of needing to own it has passed. So.. the wanting feels better than the having! So true.

galliver

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #38 on: September 02, 2013, 12:19:30 PM »
Thanks! Glad it caused a revelation, and hope it helps going forward! :)

Mike

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #39 on: September 03, 2013, 02:26:49 AM »
Several strategies:
1) Don't watch as much TV as I used to, so the exposure to ads is diminished.
2) Auto-transfers from my bank account to Vanguard minimizes the free cash floating around and available for BS expenses.
3) Convert cost in dollars to cost in time.  If I think of something in terms of the number of shifts I must work and the amount of bullshit I must put up working those shifts, that talks me out of a purchase pretty damn quick.

SunshineGirl

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #40 on: September 03, 2013, 10:41:51 AM »
On occasion, when I find myself wanting something that I know I don't REALLY want, I'll think, "Self, send the $25 to sharebuilder instead and use it to buy stocks." The idea of that always makes me happy, and you CAN actually send small amounts of money to your loans or sharebuilder or what-have-you. If you actually have the $200 to buy the ring and choose not to, send the $200 to your loan and log on to see that it got applied - it's a great feeling!

BC_Goldman

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #41 on: September 03, 2013, 11:48:38 AM »
I've reduced my exposure to advertising. My TV has been unplugged since June I think. I've watched some TV at friends' houses and I've found myself disgusted by the amount of commercials and for some really stupid stuff (like Perfect Polly). That has helped lower my desire to buy stuff.

The really big thing for me though is I'm currently unemployed so I have to be really careful with my money. I took a look at my spending last year and discovered that I made very little progress with savings. I paid down some debt which I don't list in my MS Money program but my difference between income and expenses for the year was less than $5k. Now with being unemployed, I've slashed spending and actually came out several hundred dollars ahead last month despite unemployment only being 60% of my old salary. One of my ways to focus on not spending is to write down everything I spend on a sheet of paper. I get a thrill out of seeing how many days I can go without spending money and then keeping it as low as possible when I do. For example, I was recently at Target and was looking at buying bungee cords so I can strap stuff on the back seat of my motorcycle. I probably would have spent between $6-10 on something but while I was looking at the options, I remembered that I have a whole spool of line that I bought when I was trying to experiment with indoor air drying clothes. I can use that line with the bike's luggage hooks to hold stuff pretty securely from what I can see.

I've also made a game to see how low I can keep my utilities. Last month's goal was to use less than 100 kWh and I managed 87. It took a lot of effort and turning off the water heater for the entire month but I made it. Having a gas/electric bill of less than $24 for the month was pretty awesome! I've also developed an appreciation for cold showers which I am continuing even though I've turned the water heater back on.

By focusing on cutting expenses, I've lowered my cost of living by a fair amount. Now, if I can find another job paying close to what I was making before, I'll be poised to start making significant gains towards my FI goals.

Will

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #42 on: September 03, 2013, 07:30:05 PM »
I've watched some TV at friends' houses and I've found myself disgusted by the amount of commercials and for some really stupid stuff (like Perfect Polly). That has helped lower my desire to buy stuff.

Wow!  Perfect Polly!  http://youtu.be/ELrZRru0UbQ

homemadelatte

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #43 on: September 04, 2013, 07:23:11 AM »
We recently paid off all my student loans and are totally debt-free.....so I'll encourage you that it is SUCH AN AMAZING FEELING!

I found that while we were still paying it off I wanted things so much more, because there wasn't extra money there to buy stuff. Now that the debt is gone and our savings balances are steadily increasing, I actually want things less because I don't want to take money from my savings. Stealing money from the lender didn't seem all that bad, but stealing money from my own savings is not desirable for me!

That said, we have set clothing/shoes/accessory budgets for each family member for the year, and if I absolutely loved a piece of jewelry, I would buy it with my clothing budget and have to be even more frugal for the rest of the year and find my clothing on super sale to make it all balance out. Having a set yearly budget for ourselves has helped us be picky about what we spend it on!

galliver

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #44 on: September 04, 2013, 09:34:28 AM »
homemadelatte, would you care to share your annual clothing budget (and maybe what that is as % of total)? I'm trying to figure out if mine is reasonable. :)

mgreczyn

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #45 on: September 04, 2013, 10:24:32 AM »

- Do I NEED it?
- Will I still want/love it in a year?
- Have I got something like it already?
- Would buying it feel better than being debt free?

I passively suppress most of my consumptive desires by not having cable and not spending time in stores other than grocery stores.  It really is amazing how much just not being exposed to constant advertising relieves that itch.  I also find that as I gain more experience at not buying stuff, it gets easier.  For example, my phone is old enough and slow enough that 2 years ago I would have replaced it by now.  Now?  I just deal with it.
This is what I aspire to:
- Do I need it?
- Does it fit in with my life's priorities?
If the answer is no to both, the purchase doesn't get made.  I already know the answer to your last question for me is almost always no.


homemadelatte

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #46 on: September 05, 2013, 02:30:01 PM »
homemadelatte, would you care to share your annual clothing budget (and maybe what that is as % of total)? I'm trying to figure out if mine is reasonable. :)

800 each for myself and my husband (this is all clothing, coats and shoes)
400 each for the kids (we get most of their clothes at consignment and they are always very well dressed!)

mjs111

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #47 on: September 05, 2013, 02:33:52 PM »
I like the visualization idea.  Print out $5,500 in big bold font and tape it to your office wall.  Keeps your goal nice and visible, even somewhat tangible.  Every month you can print out an updated figure.

Mike


Charlotte

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #48 on: September 06, 2013, 02:04:53 AM »
What MMM says about "frugality muscles" is completely true. When my husband and I got married, I was still technically a spender. I'd calmed down enough to spending less than I made, but I was nowhere near frugal. In fact, I had an "Old Navy budget" (can you tell where I spent most of my money??)

My husband used to ask me: "Do you really need/want that item, or do you just want to buy something?" I usually just wanted to buy something....

Fast forward 8 years and I rarely even go to Old Navy. The last few times I was there, I couldn't find anything to buy. I've only spent $10/month of my "monthly allowance" for the last three months. I might splurge and buy a kindle book or two in the next few months. But I don't even want to spend money now.

SJS

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Re: Debt dilemma: What do you tell yourself to keep yourself from buying things?
« Reply #49 on: September 06, 2013, 03:08:42 PM »
Just stay out of the stores/malls and stop looking at the magazines - these places/things all know how to lure you into buying.  Since I quite going into the malls I am not tempted in the least bit.  I actually LOVE going into the thrift stores - you can find some amazing deals and give you your "buy it" fix for a LOT LESS $$!  Try it!