Author Topic: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA  (Read 7062 times)

El Gringo

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Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« on: March 08, 2016, 07:26:20 AM »
I imagine I know what the typical response will be but Iím still curious to throw it out there and see what people say. I am currently debating between a part-time and full-time MBA program. By way of background, I work in DC for a non-profit in the international development sector. The sector is incredibly conservative when it comes to job positions/promotions etc. Without an advanced degree, at best you get promoted very slowly but most of the time youíre not even considered for anything beyond entry-level if you donít have an advanced degree. For me, itís even kind of worse, because though I was advancing at my old employer, it wasnít ultimately where I wanted to stay. So I did a lateral move to another organization, but it was kind of like starting over again, and they promote even more hesitantly. So Iím pretty stuck without an advanced degree. The typical route for someone like me is to get a masters in international development/affairs/relations or public policy, but Iíve decided to get an MBA for several reasons. For starters, in the international development field it will make me stand out and give me skills that others wonít have. Secondly, Iím very interested in working for a company thatís doing business in Africa (or consulting for companies that want to enter African markets).

Iíve applied to the following programs:
-University of Marylandís full-time MBA (accepted)
-University of Marylandís part-time MBA (accepted)
-University of South Carolinaís full-time International MBA (accepted)
-Georgetown Universityís full-time MBA (decision given on March 20)
-Georgetown Universityís full-time MBA (decision given on March 20)
-Tufts Universityís Fletcher Schoolís Masters in International Business (decision given on March 14)

Iím really debating between a full-time and part-time program. The idea of taking two years to focus on studying sounds very attractive, but I hate the idea of going $60k+ in debt. Itís exciting to think of the possibility of graduating and not having any debt. Yet at the same time, it seems exhausting and discouraging to think about being in school for three years while working full-time. Iíve had a lot of frustrations with my current job over the past two years (lots of unsatisfying work, lack of growth opportunities) and itís kind of depressing to think about staying there for three more years. There might be another opportunity at work for me to switch over to another team and work on a project I find interesting, and Iím going to talk more with some people about the opportunity.

In any case, I obviously am still waiting to hear back from some of the schools (and their financial packages), but also am facing deadlines from other schools about paying my deposit, so I need to make decisions very soon. As an example of the options I'm weighing I crunched the numbers for Maryland full-time vs. part-time. I can provide detailed numbers later if people would like but I calculate that with scholarships, tuition remission from a graduate assistantship, etc, the full-time program would cost me $16,640 per year in tuition, and my living expenses would probably be between $15k-20k per year. So over two years, it would cost me $63k-73k.  If I did part-time, I think it would cost me out of pocket about $48,000 over three years (I got a scholarship for the first year and my work provides tuition reimbursement for $5,250/year). Does anyone know how tuition costs work for taxes? Can I claim it as a tax credit or a deduction?

These are my current financials (numbers might not add up perfectly, as I was rounding):

Age: just about 29
Salary: ~$50,000 (I should finally get a promotion this July after my annual review, which I hear the standard bump is 7%)
Net worth: ~$76,200

Savings: ~$18,000
Brokerage: ~$2,440
Undergraduate loans: ~$3,420
Retirement: ~59,700
   401k: ~$13,500 ($12,168.84 vested)
   Roth IRA:~$23,200
   Rollover IRA: ~$23,000

Obviously it seems like sticking out the part-time would be well worth it financially. Though of course everyone who does a full-time MBA says it was well worth the money and their salary boost paid for it. But I feel my situation is not traditional, so I'm more hesitant. Although everyone who does part-time seems to think it was worth it too for them. Just curious what other people's experiences and thoughts are in regards to a part-time vs. full-time MBA and if they feel you significantly miss out on the experience/education/network if you do a part-time program.

Tuskalusa

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2016, 08:01:28 AM »
I think one thing you need to consider is your plan after you graduate. Do you plan to stay with current company, or do you expand your horizons to new companies and opportunities?

If you want to stay with current employer, then a PT MBA could make sense.  I think the downside is that you're not likely to get an immediate the salary bump or change in scope the day you graduate. You may need to find a new role, fight for it, and justify an "above average" salary bump. (This is just what I've seen with my employers, and I've always breathed a sigh of relief that I went FT.)

If you want to make a big shift in career and opportunity, a FT MBA is a great opportunity, especially if you can go to a well-known school and keep the costs down. There are some good ways to keep costs down. Perhaps a part time job that's less taxing while you were in school, or some kind of part time university job. I was able to cut MBA costs by getting a PT TAcposition. This gave me enough to to pay rent, paid healthcare, and in-state tuition (even though I was from out of state.)

Im sure you will be successful either way.  You have some great colleges here. Once you understand your long term goal, you'll have a grea approach. Good luck!

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2016, 08:15:58 AM »
Thanks Tuskalusa!

I'm definitely looking to make a transition. I don't see it as a leap, per se (like from one career to another), but changing course a little. Definitely expanding my horizons. Right now I'm discontent where I am at work, and would love to just jump ship, do a FT MBA to focus on school and try out new things through experiences like a summer internship and experiential projects. But on the other hand, I look at coming out of school two years from now with $65,000+ in debt, and that feels depressing after having worked so hard to build up my net worth over the past few years. I just feel really torn between my values!
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 08:21:11 AM by El Gringo »

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2016, 08:53:39 AM »
Well, an update! One of my two supervisors announced yesterday she is leaving and today my other boss informed me that I would get a promotion (not quite to my supervisor's level, but still a promotion), and we would hire two new people with my current title...which makes staying a little more attractive.

MoneyRx

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 09:31:02 AM »
I am currently doing a PT MBA while working FT and I think its great. One difference for me though is that I already have an advanced degree, so the MBA is secondary and won't make or break my salary or employment opportunities. For PT, the flexibility of the scheduling is the best part, if you get busy with work or life, then take a less intensive class or take a quarter off.

I am curious how you chose your list of schools- Since you are worried about the tuition, there are a ton of high quality schools out there (including other state schools) that offer much cheaper tuition. Also, does your employer offer any tuition assistance? Many employers do and this is a great way to get it paid for while continuing to work.

For taxes- you can deduct the tuition, fees, books, etc. up to $4k/yr. or you may qualify for the lifetime learning credit of $2k if your income is low enough. From my experience, these usually end up being about the same amount of tax savings. TurboTax (and I'm guessing other tax software) will calculate this for you and give you the best option.
https://www.irs.gov/publications/p970/ch06.html
https://www.irs.gov/publications/p970/ch03.html
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 09:33:04 AM by MoneyRx »

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2016, 09:48:29 AM »
I picked the schools out of a combination of location, uniqueness of degree, and cost. Here in DC, there are two public schools that provide in-state tuition to DC residents: University of Maryland and George Mason. University of Maryland is much better than George Mason. Other state schools in the area (UVA, Penn State, etc) would have been out-of-state tuition, though I didn't realize until later that if I get a graduate assistantship you get in-state tuition. Meanwhile, all the other schools in DC are private schools: American, Georgetown, George Washington, Catholic U. I really like Georgetown's program (it has the most opportunity to focus my studies on doing business in Africa and other emerging/frontier markets, and its ranked the highest in the area). I figured I'd apply to Georgetown and see what sort of financial package I get (both for FT and PT). USC and Tufts I applied to because of their specific programs. USC has an International MBA, which is ranked #1 and has some interesting language immersion aspects to the program. Meanwhile, Tufts' Fletcher School probably provides the most perfect mix of what I'm interested in, which is essentially the intersection of business and development in Africa. I'm super interested in their MIB program, but 1) it would require me to move out of DC, 2) it's a private school with an expensive tuition, and 3) I'm a little leery about getting an MIB, which most people have no idea what that means, as opposed to an MBA, which everyone knows.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2016, 08:04:37 AM »
I'm surprised - I thought I'd have more people screaming to do the part-time MBA!

pbkmaine

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2016, 08:29:36 AM »
Not screaming, but part time seems to make a lot of sense for you. Unless, of course, you can obtain a full-time aid package that covers both tuition and living expenses with no loans.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2016, 12:59:44 PM »
Well, I've got some updates.

I've also got accepted into Georgetown and Tufts' Fletcher School. Georgetown is probably my first choice, but unfortunately for full-time they didn't give me any money and for part-time they only gave me a $2,500 scholarship for the first year.  Tufts gave me a 50% scholarship for their full-time. So these are my options:

Georgetown FT: an estimated cost of $157,000 over two years between tuition/books ($121k) and living expenses ($36k)
Maryland FT: an estimated cost of $69,000 over two years between tuition ($33k) and living expenses ($36k)
Tufts FT: An estimated cost of $95,000 over two years between tuition/books ($55k) and living expenses ($40k)
University of South Carolina: An estimated cost of $71,000 over two years between tuition/books ($30k) and living expenses ($41k)

Georgetown PT: An estimated cost of $92,262 over three years for tuition (including $5250/year of tuition reimbursement from my work)
Maryland PT: An estimated cost of $48,000 over three years for tuition (including $5250/year of tuition reimbursement from my work)

Georgetown is my first choice - not only because of the name, but I also feel like they provide the best opportunity to focus on doing business in Africa specifically. I was assuming the FT program price would be out of reach, but I hoping that for the part-time program I would get more money. Is it worth paying an extra $44,000 for a Georgetown MBA, which has a better name recognition and a better opportunity to focus specifically on doing business in Africa?

University of South Carolina also contacted me on Friday and told me that they have more money to give me (I didn't even ask for it!) I'm not sure yet how much - they have to take it to the scholarship committee first. But I visited the school after I got accepted and wasn't really feeling it.  Even though the degree is an International MBA, I felt like the job prospects were very regional around the southeast, and it didn't provide much opportunity to focus on Africa.

pbkmaine

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2016, 01:13:36 PM »
It's not an extra $44k for PT at Georgetown. You also have salary coming in.

historienne

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2016, 01:33:56 PM »
I think you are calculating this a bit wrong.

For all three choices, you should calculate your estimated costs over three years, and also your estimated salary over three years.  If the tuition reimbursement requires you to stay at your job for a certain period afterwards, then you should include that time as well.  You are going to be paying living expenses no matter which option you choose; it's not like your rent is free right now.  The difference is that if you go full time, you won't be earning a salary for two years (but you will then, perhaps, earn more when you graduate?).  Plus the tuition differences, of course.

pbkmaine

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2016, 03:55:55 PM »

I think you are calculating this a bit wrong.

For all three choices, you should calculate your estimated costs over three years, and also your estimated salary over three years.  If the tuition reimbursement requires you to stay at your job for a certain period afterwards, then you should include that time as well.  You are going to be paying living expenses no matter which option you choose; it's not like your rent is free right now.  The difference is that if you go full time, you won't be earning a salary for two years (but you will then, perhaps, earn more when you graduate?).  Plus the tuition differences, of course.

This. What will be your net cash flow, including salary, living expenses, tuition in all these scenarios?

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2016, 07:26:26 AM »
I think you are calculating this a bit wrong.

For all three choices, you should calculate your estimated costs over three years, and also your estimated salary over three years.  If the tuition reimbursement requires you to stay at your job for a certain period afterwards, then you should include that time as well.  You are going to be paying living expenses no matter which option you choose; it's not like your rent is free right now.  The difference is that if you go full time, you won't be earning a salary for two years (but you will then, perhaps, earn more when you graduate?).  Plus the tuition differences, of course.

Yeah, you're absolutely right. I tend to focus on *debt*, which is why for a full-time program, I'm also thinking about living expenses, because it's all being paid by debt, whereas in my part-time program, it's not as much of a concern. But you're right.

Below is what I calculated for Fall 2016 thru Spring 2019 (when I would graduate from a PT program). I should add that it's hard to accurately estimate what my salary will be post-graduation. There's a broad range of things I'm interested in (and could potentially be) doing. If I were to work for a multinational company doing business in Africa, surely my salary would be on the higher end, but if I stay somewhere more towards the "social good" end of the spectrum (impact investing, public-private partnerships, international development, etc), the salary would be lower.

Maryland PT:
-tuition costs after work's tuition reimbursement: $47,852.00
-living expenses:  ~$53,500
-salary, after taxes: ~$108,000
-contributions from work to retirement account: ~$16,500 (in addition to a 4% match, they also have a contribution they give that does not depend on my own contribution. It's currently at 2.5% but I need to work another year for it to be vested. After that, I begin getting *another* 4%, that is immediately vested)
Net: ~$23,150

Georgetown PT:
-tuition costs after work's tuition reimbursement: $92,262.50
-living expenses:  ~$53,500
-salary, after taxes: ~$108,000
-contributions from work to retirement account: ~$16,500
 Net: ~$-21,375

Maryland FT:
-tuition and living expenses during school: $73,000
-living expenses third year, after graduating: $20,000
-conservative estimate of post-tax salary after graduating: $47,000 (assuming $65,000 salary)
-less conservative estimate of post-tax salary after graduating: $56,000 (assuming $80,000 salary)
-Conservative net: -$46,000
-Less conservative net: -$37,000]/


Tufts Fletcher School FT:
-tuition and living expenses during school: $95,450
-living expenses third year, after graduating: $20,000
-conservative estimate of post-tax salary after graduating: $47,000 (assuming $65,000 salary)
-less conservative estimate of post-tax salary after graduating: $56,000 (assuming $80,000 salary)
-Conservative net: -$68,450
-Less conservative net: -$59,450


By a purely financial standpoint, doing Maryland PT is a clear winner. I just worry that if I want to make a little bit of a transition, that it won't open that opportunity for me as much as other options would. I've also been talking with some Fletcher school grads recently, and being a school that focuses on public policy, diplomacy, and development, the Masters in Business students are getting jobs in things that I find really interesting and want to do (and as one alum told me, he thought everyone at the traditional business schools were boring...which is kind of how I feel). And no one there says that they regret the debt they took on.

I'm attracted to the Maryland PT program because of the finances, but sometimes when I think about my career, I worry that I'm being too short-sighted or myopic in my focus on finances - I want to be financially independent, but I also want to enjoy life and do work that I love until I get there. If money wasn't a consideration, Tufts is the program I would most enjoy. And though I could get the type of jobs that I want to do with either an MBA or am MIB, the alumni network of Tufts seems more relevant to me.

I've been talking with a lot of people in my field/the fields I'm interested in working in, as well as people who are in the programs I'm looking at. I feel awkward explaining to them my financial goals of being financially independent. As most people on this forum experience, people don't get that. Perhaps even more so in my field, where people pursue this work because of their passions, not for money.  This is the only place where I can really talk about that goal. At the same time, since my career field is so niche, I feel like no one here truly understands the dynamics and issues in my field and how that should affect my decision.

In other words, I wish I could find someone who I feel truly understands both my values of financial independence as well as the career field I'm trying to succeed in!

« Last Edit: March 29, 2016, 08:03:38 AM by El Gringo »

garion

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2016, 07:36:36 AM »
Could you do part-time and/or summer work in your field during a FT MBA? This could change those calculations a bit.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2016, 08:04:40 AM »
I'm looking into that for Tufts. For Maryland, the financial calculations actually include the graduate assistantship that they have granted me. Not sure if I could do a part-time job on top of the graduate assistantship.

Guesl982374

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2016, 07:03:26 AM »
I personally went the PT MBA route. It helped me make the jump from an engineering role to a commercial role. Did it take an extra year to make the move after completing my PT MBA vs if I had gone FT? Yup. Did my employer pay my salary and tuition reimbursement making it a no brainer financially? Yup. Do I think I would have ended up in a drastically different role/salary if I went the FT route vs. the PT route? No.

I've always believed that FT MBA only make sense if you go to a top tier school and you want to get recruited into high priced management consulting, investment banking, etc. I don't know your particular industry at all so you'll have to make a determination if your industry 'cares' if its from a specific school or if its PT vs. FT. In my mind, this is the only reason to consider spending the ~$80K difference between your cheapest option and your most expensive option.

Trust someone on the other side of the PT MBA, a MBA is a MBA unless its from a top tier school and you are in/want to be in select industries.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2016, 07:25:41 AM »
I personally went the PT MBA route. It helped me make the jump from an engineering role to a commercial role. Did it take an extra year to make the move after completing my PT MBA vs if I had gone FT? Yup. Did my employer pay my salary and tuition reimbursement making it a no brainer financially? Yup. Do I think I would have ended up in a drastically different role/salary if I went the FT route vs. the PT route? No.

I've always believed that FT MBA only make sense if you go to a top tier school and you want to get recruited into high priced management consulting, investment banking, etc. I don't know your particular industry at all so you'll have to make a determination if your industry 'cares' if its from a specific school or if its PT vs. FT. In my mind, this is the only reason to consider spending the ~$80K difference between your cheapest option and your most expensive option.

Trust someone on the other side of the PT MBA, a MBA is a MBA unless its from a top tier school and you are in/want to be in select industries.

This is really encouraging and helpful to hear!

pbkmaine

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2016, 08:08:34 AM »
Why Maryland rather than Georgetown? Isn't Georgetown less out of pocket and a better school?

Guesl982374

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2016, 08:14:43 AM »
Why Maryland rather than Georgetown? Isn't Georgetown less out of pocket and a better school?

This got me too until I reread it. Maryland PT is $23K positive vs. Georgetown is -$21K out of pocket for a net cost difference of $44K

pbkmaine

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2016, 08:15:27 AM »
LOL. Never mind.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2016, 08:37:20 AM »
Why Maryland rather than Georgetown? Isn't Georgetown less out of pocket and a better school?

This got me too until I reread it. Maryland PT is $23K positive vs. Georgetown is -$21K out of pocket for a net cost difference of $44K

Exactly. I was wondering if the negative net would be clear. Sorry for the lack of clarity. I really like Georgetown's program (more focus on international/Africa, and better name recognition. But they're actually pretty closely ranked, and Maryland is a lot cheaper. The PT Georgetown program has a lot of Georgetown employees who get the degree entirely for free, which would be amazing, but doesn't make sense for me career-wise.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2016, 10:56:15 AM »
Agh. Haha. I just talked to one of my colleagues who is a graduate of the Maryland PT program, and he actually said that he thinks the name recognition, connections/network, and ability to focus internationally is worth the extra expense of going to Georgetown PT. Talking to him definitely swayed me more back towards considering Georgetown.

Am I crazy?

garion

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2016, 11:16:04 AM »
Agh. Haha. I just talked to one of my colleagues who is a graduate of the Maryland PT program, and he actually said that he thinks the name recognition, connections/network, and ability to focus internationally is worth the extra expense of going to Georgetown PT. Talking to him definitely swayed me more back towards considering Georgetown.

Am I crazy?

What's more important than whether he thinks it is worth the expense is how he and his Maryland PT classmates are doing in their careers. Are they employed in jobs that you would want?

GregO

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2016, 12:55:43 PM »
Agh. Haha. I just talked to one of my colleagues who is a graduate of the Maryland PT program, and he actually said that he thinks the name recognition, connections/network, and ability to focus internationally is worth the extra expense of going to Georgetown PT. Talking to him definitely swayed me more back towards considering Georgetown.

Am I crazy?
I'm reading between the lines here, but it appears to me that you have already made quite a few connections in the field you want to be in.  Have you asked them if they thought it'd make a difference where your degree came from?  It sounds to me like you could continue to build your network among your desired field on your own while you go to school and let them know your plans/desires.  You could find your own in-roads into the field without relying or paying for the connections of a university.

I think the clear winner is the PT Maryland program.  The cost difference is MASSIVE.  And I agree with the other poster who said that most MBAs are all similar once you graduate.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2016, 01:10:17 PM »
I'm reading between the lines here, but it appears to me that you have already made quite a few connections in the field you want to be in.  Have you asked them if they thought it'd make a difference where your degree came from?  It sounds to me like you could continue to build your network among your desired field on your own while you go to school and let them know your plans/desires.  You could find your own in-roads into the field without relying or paying for the connections of a university.

I think the clear winner is the PT Maryland program.  The cost difference is MASSIVE.  And I agree with the other poster who said that most MBAs are all similar once you graduate.

Correct - I have a fairly robust network already related to the field.

tipster350

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2016, 01:28:12 PM »
I personally went the PT MBA route. It helped me make the jump from an engineering role to a commercial role. Did it take an extra year to make the move after completing my PT MBA vs if I had gone FT? Yup. Did my employer pay my salary and tuition reimbursement making it a no brainer financially? Yup. Do I think I would have ended up in a drastically different role/salary if I went the FT route vs. the PT route? No.

I've always believed that FT MBA only make sense if you go to a top tier school and you want to get recruited into high priced management consulting, investment banking, etc. I don't know your particular industry at all so you'll have to make a determination if your industry 'cares' if its from a specific school or if its PT vs. FT. In my mind, this is the only reason to consider spending the ~$80K difference between your cheapest option and your most expensive option.

Trust someone on the other side of the PT MBA, a MBA is a MBA unless its from a top tier school and you are in/want to be in select industries.

Agree. As long as the school is good, the school you picked won't have much impact on your career long-term. It just doesn't matter to the degree it might appear at this point in your life. Experience will trump school choice over the long term. That is, unless you are looking for the paths outlined above in consulting, etc.

I did mine p/t. If done over again, I would have aimed a tad higher in my school choice but still done it p/t.

El Gringo

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2016, 01:19:24 PM »
So an update: I decided to do Maryland part-time. I put down my deposit, but Georgetown has come back and given me an additional $12,500, plus another $1000 to reimburse me for my deposit to Maryland. As a result, Georgetown would now cost $30,000 more than Maryland. If I put all my expendable income into tuition, I would more or less graduate from Maryland breaking even, and I'd graduate from Georgetown with $30,000 debt. I love the idea of graduating without any debt (more opportunity to travel, more capability of taking a lower-paying job that I might prefer more, money I could save for a house, or money I could put towards FIRE). But almost everyone I talk to in the areas of work I want to do say hands-down to do Georgetown because of its name and network.

I'm probably becoming tiresome with my constant indecision, but figured I'd post an update and see if anyone had additional thoughts!

deeshen13

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2016, 03:17:17 PM »
A vote her for Georgetown for two reasons.

1) Reading between the lines, it is apparent to me that you want to attend Georgetown. If it's apparent to me, it's probably apparent to you. So, emotional point to Georgetown.

2) I think a case can easily be made that the financial point should also go to Georgetown. You keep focusing on just the initial outlay in cost of the programs.  The real decision maker of course is a net present value calculation; basically will the additional 30k present outlay be made up for over the course of your working lifetime due to attending Georgetown versus Maryland. My instinct is, yes, and probably quite easily (an extra 4k/yr for 10 years would do so, for example).  Additionally, if Georgetown offers superior options in your desired field, I wouldn't even begin to try to quantify the value of increased lifetime happiness, but it's there.

Good luck, keep us posted!

mozar

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Re: Debating between part-time and full-time MBA
« Reply #28 on: June 06, 2016, 01:48:50 PM »
If you want to take a low paying job I still vote for Georgetown because there is a lot more competition for low paying jobs and Georgetown will make you stand out.