Author Topic: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?  (Read 5557 times)

kevj1085

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This could really go for anything, but especially something like CrossFit where you can so easily replicate it at home. My wife and I love watching the CrossFit games and YouTube videos of it, it kind of motivates us. I don't really need motivation from it because I've always been self driven, but I love the group atmosphere concept. That said, with inflation in our country, unpredictable future, 2 kids age 1 and 4, I just cannot in any circumstances justify 2.5ish k a year, and possibly even more if our kids eventually go.

Before anyone says I justify it as being important to my health, at my house I have squat stands, a bar with 500 lbs of bumper plates, a pull-up bar with rings, a 40 lb weight vest, a glute ham raise machine, power belt, Olympic lifting shoes, fat grip handles, adjustable kettlebell, home made box jump, chalk, music, jump rope, tire to sled drag with, foam roller, and a classic air dyne bike that works great. I train for strength with my lifting and incorporate wods as often as I can by myself. All of this equipment was just under 2k, which is cheaper than 1 year of CrossFit for my wife and I, AND it will last us our whole lives. And yes, we use it all at least 4-5 times a week, as well as go to a half a mile hill weekly and run up and down it. So the claim for it has to be done at a xfit gym for ones health, to me, is false.

I think about how my kids will need a college fund one day, unexpected emergencies like car repairs, or when they're in sports and need money for stuff etc.

And yet, I keep coming back to really wishing I was at a CrossFit gym. I just can't get past though what all else that money could be used for over the course of 20 years.

Sorry long rant, now over lol.

kevj1085

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Sorry for double post, it was lagging so I x'ed out and of course it made 2.

kendallf

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If you are motivated and consistent while working out at home, I think you've answered your own question.  If you miss the social aspect of it, why not try to create your own workout group with friends at your house?  I am a cyclist primarily and fortunately I can ride with groups for free.

I give this advice while realizing that personalities often trump intentions in this regard.  My wife is currently paying large amounts of money to work out at a TFW gym because she enjoys the structure and social aspects, but doesn't like bringing people to our house. 

kevj1085

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If you are motivated and consistent while working out at home, I think you've answered your own question.  If you miss the social aspect of it, why not try to create your own workout group with friends at your house?  I am a cyclist primarily and fortunately I can ride with groups for free.

I give this advice while realizing that personalities often trump intentions in this regard.  My wife is currently paying large amounts of money to work out at a TFW gym because she enjoys the structure and social aspects, but doesn't like bringing people to our house.

That's me exactly. If I'm going to do it at home, I much prefer the solitude aspect of finally having a moment in the day just to be by myself. I don't want to have to deal with other people at my house. However, the idea of being w a big group of like minded people somewhere else sounds appealing.

kevj1085

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The only other issue I have with training at home is that I've always wanted to master Olympic lifting, and besides power cleans, hang cleans, and power snatches, I really can't do a proper full clean or full snatch as I've never been properly trained on them. I can do squat bench dead and press just fine but those aren't awfully technical. I'd also love to learn double understand, handstand walks, and ring muscle ups. All things I know I have the strength for but no clue how to do them technique wise.

But then I ask as always, is $2500 a year just to learn those things really worth it? I'm already fit without them.

Mr. Green

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How much enjoyment do you get out of the gym aspect of CrossFit? That happiness is worth something. Maybe not $2,500 a year, or maybe it is. That's $1,250, or about $100 a month for each you and your wife. Is what you get out of the gym worth $100 a month to you? If it isn't then it isn't, to each their own.

I don't have the drive to push myself at home like I do in the gym. Just being around other people turns on my competitive juices and makes me perform better. I've also enjoyed the community aspect of the CrossFit gyms I've been to over the years. When I've recovered from injury enough that I can fully participate in CrossFit style workouts again, I will likely return to a CrossFit gym because I enjoy the setting and it's worth the cost to me, even though I have a rower, barbell, and ample space to workout at home.

kevj1085

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Motivation on my own has never been an issue, I've always made time for it and have worked up to a 435 275 510 squat bench dead total at 165 lbs in powerlifting competition on my own. The biggest thing for me is that the group atmosphere LOOKS fun, not that I need it.

I dont know, in my eyes my kids are my biggest asset in my life and I would be very let down in myself if I ever put us in a bad financial situation or couldn't pay for something they need just because I wanted something like this.

kenaces

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Maybe there is middle path?

Get some crossfit friends to meet up with to do some WODs at your house or wherever.  In many ways this was the original premis of the mainsiteWODs

Check out your local crossfit gym drop in rates, and maybe just hang with them a few times a month.

If there is specific skill you want to work on pay for a little coaching.

Check out the crossfit.com message boards to connect with other "home gym" crossfitters

Zikoris

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I don't do Crossfit, but I do take dance classes, and have recently started some boutique (dance-related) fitness classes, which are far from cheap. I could probably roughly replicate a lot of it from home, but there are a few advantages that maybe could apply to Crossfit as well.

- I have the personality type where I really enjoy group classes, and find them motivating.
- I have to improvise a lot at home, since I don't have a ballet barre, mats, a lot of space, or a not-carpet floor area. Dance studios are just way better equipped than anything I can throw together.
- I find having an instructor correcting technique to be extremely helpful for improving. In dance, especially ballet, there are so many little things you can do wrong, and it's better to avoid falling into bad habits that you'll have to correct in the future.

Not sure if any of these apply to Crossfit, but that's my take on it.

Laura33

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If you are motivated and consistent while working out at home, I think you've answered your own question.

This.

If the question is how do *I* justify Crossfit, it's based entirely on results.  About 3 years ago I hurt my back and had to give up running.  I spent the next @2+ years trying to find something that would stick, and I totally failed -- we're talking 2.5 years of $75/mo Y memberships that never got used, plus equipment at home AND at work, and I still couldn't find anything that got my heart rate up like running did and that didn't bore me within a few weeks.  And then I started Crossfit about 6 months ago, and now I am up to 4-5 times/week and am completely hooked.  The class times are exactly what I need to work around my job, it is a block from my house so I have no excuses for not getting there, the mix of work is just right for me, and having a coach there makes me work a *lot* harder than I would ever work on my own.  It is freaking awesome. 

So for me, I justify Crossfit because it is the only thing that has worked. 

You, OTOH, don't seem to have my fundamental laziness and are doing just fine on your own.  So you would need a different justification than I do.

kevj1085

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I don't do Crossfit, but I do take dance classes, and have recently started some boutique (dance-related) fitness classes, which are far from cheap. I could probably roughly replicate a lot of it from home, but there are a few advantages that maybe could apply to Crossfit as well.

- I have the personality type where I really enjoy group classes, and find them motivating.
- I have to improvise a lot at home, since I don't have a ballet barre, mats, a lot of space, or a not-carpet floor area. Dance studios are just way better equipped than anything I can throw together.
- I find having an instructor correcting technique to be extremely helpful for improving. In dance, especially ballet, there are so many little things you can do wrong, and it's better to avoid falling into bad habits that you'll have to correct in the future.

Not sure if any of these apply to Crossfit, but that's my take on it.

Yes, there are things similar to that in CrossFit in that you don't want to keep grooving improper form, but again that's something I weigh out the cost to benefit ratio. I know my squat bench dead and press form is sufficient because I've been doing it without injury for over a decade and have practiced it a great deal. However, there are many workouts that might call for say "100 calories on the air dyne bike" but my air dynes calorie monitor is broken. Instead of sweating that, I take it upon myself to gauge that I have sufficiently trained to a point where I am satisfied with the results. In the end I could have paid $900 for a full functioning air dyne bike , but I opted for a used one for $100 without a working monitor. Same results as long as I accept not "knowing" the calories burned.

kevj1085

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If you are motivated and consistent while working out at home, I think you've answered your own question.

This.

If the question is how do *I* justify Crossfit, it's based entirely on results.  About 3 years ago I hurt my back and had to give up running.  I spent the next @2+ years trying to find something that would stick, and I totally failed -- we're talking 2.5 years of $75/mo Y memberships that never got used, plus equipment at home AND at work, and I still couldn't find anything that got my heart rate up like running did and that didn't bore me within a few weeks.  And then I started Crossfit about 6 months ago, and now I am up to 4-5 times/week and am completely hooked.  The class times are exactly what I need to work around my job, it is a block from my house so I have no excuses for not getting there, the mix of work is just right for me, and having a coach there makes me work a *lot* harder than I would ever work on my own.  It is freaking awesome. 

So for me, I justify Crossfit because it is the only thing that has worked. 

You, OTOH, don't seem to have my fundamental laziness and are doing just fine on your own.  So you would need a different justification than I do.

Just out of curiosity, how can you do CrossFit with a bad back but not running? CrossFit uses ones back way more than running, and running is also involved in xfit, albeit not to the level of just pure running. Do you just modify?

Laura33

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Just out of curiosity, how can you do CrossFit with a bad back but not running? CrossFit uses ones back way more than running, and running is also involved in xfit, albeit not to the level of just pure running. Do you just modify?

My "back" issue is an instability, not a disc or anything -- my spine is slightly curved, so one leg "acts" like it's shorter than the other.  When I pound repeatedly with the running, after a few weeks, my muscles just seize up, even with chiropractic, stretching, yoga, etc.  Crossfit is great because it is actually helping me build up some of those back muscles that support the spine (just got my deadlift over 200 lbs about 2 weeks ago, which feels freaking awesome).  But, yeah, I still don't do a lot of the longer running -- experience says that I am "safe" for about a half a mile before it starts to twinge.  So today's 4x200-yard sprints were fine, but I did Murph on the rowing machine.

But that's the other thing that I like about it:  it's not a big deal to modify, and the coaches tend to push me to do that to avoid pain.  I am very, very competitive, but I am also over 50, and so I tend to try too hard to hit the Rx until I get injured.  But unlike running, where I basically have to stop for several weeks, the coaches help me modify to avoid injury, and to keep coming in and doing something even when I am hurt.

tthree

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And yet, I keep coming back to really wishing I was at a CrossFit gym. I just can't get past though what all else that money could be used for over the course of 20 years.
Go to your local Cross Fit Gym.  Find out if it is worth 2.5K/year for YOU.

Our local Cross Fit gym is amazing.  I went for approximately 2 years between #1 and #2, and was in the best shape of my life.  I don't currently go as I can't justify the expense (I get a membership for FREE else where, and get paid to teach fitness classes there); however, our 8year old currently attends Cross Fit Kids as this the ONLY extra curricular he has gone to without complaining.

When I attended I only had a 2X/week membership, as I was still teaching 3+/week elsewhere.  The 2X/week membership was significantly cheaper than unlimited.  Have you looked into a similar arrangement?

Also our local Cross Fit Gym has sessional classes.


tthree

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But that's the other thing that I like about it:  it's not a big deal to modify, and the coaches tend to push me to do that to avoid pain.  I am very, very competitive, but I am also over 50, and so I tend to try too hard to hit the Rx until I get injured.  But unlike running, where I basically have to stop for several weeks, the coaches help me modify to avoid injury, and to keep coming in and doing something even when I am hurt.
Sounds like you have an amazing Cross Fit gym.  Keep going:)

goldensam

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I joined a barre studio last fall. Before that, I've tried joining a mid-range gym and buying lots of home workout DVDs and small equipment like dumbbells and kettlebells, but never stuck to anything. I pay $139/month and until I had surgeries in April and June for which I am still in recovery and physical therapy, I was going 4x a week on average and absolutely loved it. I have never seen such progress and felt so strong! I'm pretty introverted, so the group aspect isn't what makes it worth it to me. At first, I was motivated by the fact that I was spending so far out of my comfort zone to have a membership. After a few months, the changes in my body and strength levels became more than worth it.

Since my knee surgeries, I have really only done my PT at the hospital and at home and have not done much of any exercise on any other part of my body. I feel weak and flabby again and it just further proves that I am not motivated enough to do it on my own, and the cost becomes very worth it.

tp_from_ks

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Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2017, 07:12:20 PM »
I think you answered your own question... money is more important than the experience the CF gym would provide.

I wanted to share our situation, maybe there's another way for you?

Wife and I live in LCOL small town... gym here does CF but isn't official, yearly cost $1200 for 2 ( no one would support 2k + dues / year here). Everyone is supportive, not competitive, it fits our wants.
You could ask around, see if there's unofficial CF box that is lower cost. We don't have options, just one cheap place.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 07:14:52 PM by tp_from_ks »

Pylortes

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Yeah I don't quite get this.  You are kicking butt at home, have already invested in sufficient equipment and have great motivation.  Why go out looking for something else better (and much more expensive) when you already got it all figured out?  I'd suggest finding another (cheaper) outlet to meet your social/excercise needs.  If you want to learn Olympic lifts etc maybe you could purchase some coaching sessions and read some books/watch videos.   Those cross fit guys wish (or ought to wish) they had your setup and motivation- they have to pay for the external motivation!


Drole

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I stumbled across a group online...Jesse itzler's #wedohardstuff on facebook. For me, it's been nice as he comes up with about 15 days of challenges for people to do over a month's time. But you also post progress and get a bit of community from the facebook group. 

I can't justify crossfit either, but am traveling, have no equipment, and can't run as i'm also flying solo with the kids and have no one to watch them if I were to do a long run. So it's been good for me.

If this isn't the fit for you, maybe another online group.

Broadway2019

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I pay $135 a month to do CrossFit 3X a week and am going to be upping my membership to unlimited as I want to go every day. Working out on your own is great! However, I like having a coach and someone who will help correct my form. Also, I work much harder at CrossFit than I would at home. Something about the competition of other people. I work at home currently so this is my social interaction and about 2 miles from my house. I look forward to going every day and really enjoy it. Much better than going to happy hours or other non-healthy activities.

Also, as a tip, if you do decide to go to a Crossfit gym, do not buy them on Groupon to save money. I have gone to about 10 CrossFit gyms over the past 3 years and anytime I bought on Groupon, it was awful and the coaches were not trained properly. It takes some time to really find a good gym with great coaches. For me, the coaches are what makes Crossfit worth it or not.

RyanAtTanagra

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Saw the empty thread first, xposting from there:

I don't do crossfit, but I have friends that do/have, and I don't have anything against it.  Couple things:

1)  Not all of us live somewhere we can have a home gym.

2)  For people getting into fitness, it's more accurately compared to the cost of hiring a personal trainer, because you do get coaching and guidance as part of the plan.  It's not just an open gym.

3)  They also have classes, which would also usually cost more other places, or at least they do for intense, strength-training classes that includes coaching, not just spin/yoga/tai-bo  So for people that need to do things in a group to stay motivated, crossfit starts to be more worth it.  Some people just won't work out at home, even if they buy all the same equipment they use at the gym.

4)  The social aspect is a huge motivator for a lot of people, and part of crossfit is the culture driving the social aspect.  I go to a cheap gym, and people are friendly and know each other a little, but they don't drive each other, everyone keeps to themselves.

If you're happy with what you have, and are happy with your fitness progress, then crossfit wouldn't be worth it for you, imo.

afulldeck

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2017, 01:27:42 PM »
Perhaps its time for a side-gig?

StudentEngineer

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2017, 09:48:38 PM »
I know people who've talked to the owners and worked out spending some time before and/or after classes to clean up the gym a bit which resulted in reduced membership fees.  Perhaps you could look into that?

PNW

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2017, 10:34:49 PM »
I have access to a gym for free, but still pay for a crossfit membership. How I justify it:

1. Socializing - way less boring to work out with a group, I look forward to it rather than having to force myself off the couch to work out.
2. Group motivation - I try harder when other people are doing the same thing.
3. Coaching - especially important for the olympic lifts and gymnastics skills.
4. I go 4-5 times a week, so compared to what else I could be spending money on during that time, the cost makes sense to me.

If you don't need that group setting, but want to up your skills, I would recommend online coaching. There are LOTS of people who will work with you on gymnastics and olympic lifting skills 100% online (just have to be willing to video yourself). I would expect the cost for this would be significantly less than actually joining a gym, plus you have all the gear/equipment already.

StudentEngineer

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2017, 08:18:42 AM »
I also think you can teach yourself the vast majority of the technique by videoing yourself and comparing to videos online.  That's how Ben Smith learned his Olympic lifts, and he won the games in 2015 so its definitely possible.

That or sign up for a weekend class every so often to see if you can pick any tips up.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2017, 08:49:25 AM »
I also think you can teach yourself the vast majority of the technique by videoing yourself and comparing to videos online.  That's how Ben Smith learned his Olympic lifts, and he won the games in 2015 so its definitely possible.

I wouldn't recommend that for olympic lifts.  Risk of injury is way too high.  You might think you look the same as the other person's video, but could be off by something you didn't notice that could be critical in avoiding injury.  I think personal trainers are 90% waisted money, but getting started on lifting is one area I think it's justified, just until you're confident in your form.

spacklebum

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2017, 09:36:02 AM »
I don't think the social environment is that easy to replicate at home; Do you really have 4-15 friends with the same work schedule and flexibility? And do you really want to plan your own workouts every single day? Plus maintain gym equipment when it breaks?

Crossfit is worth it to me because they do have a lot of equipment I'd rather not take up space at home, even though I could afford it. And having a coach not only train me in proper form but make sure it doesn't change in the course of a hard workout when I'm gassed and not thinking straight. The classes are small enough that when I have questions, I essentially get individual coaching. And I love not having to think about which muscle group or cycle I'm training, I just show up and do the work.

Considering what I get out of it, I think the price is pretty reasonable especially compared to personal trainers/online coaches.

StudentEngineer

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2017, 10:45:06 AM »
I also think you can teach yourself the vast majority of the technique by videoing yourself and comparing to videos online.  That's how Ben Smith learned his Olympic lifts, and he won the games in 2015 so its definitely possible.

I wouldn't recommend that for olympic lifts.  Risk of injury is way too high.  You might think you look the same as the other person's video, but could be off by something you didn't notice that could be critical in avoiding injury.  I think personal trainers are 90% waisted money, but getting started on lifting is one area I think it's justified, just until you're confident in your form.

I pretty much agree, I wouldn't recommend it per say. But it can definitely be done.  The internet has all the answers out there, just need to search for them.  If you want to spend time efficiently then a trainer is the way to go.

Finances_With_Purpose

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Re: Crossfit- if you do it, how do you justify the price on so many levels?
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2017, 01:06:40 AM »
I do it now, but don't know if I'll continue.

Why? I need accountability.  It provides awesome accountability, fun, and a skillful instructor, so I'm constantly learning new things. 

Geographically, we don't have great friend/group options that are free/low-cost where I live so far as I'm aware of.  (If that changes, I could see dropping crossfit one day.)  In fact, I've even tried to get friends to do workouts together & etc. but it has never worked out. 

I also do this because it's a weakness for me.  I know my limitations; I guard against my weaknesses.  It ensures that I stay committed to physical fitness (even though I do enjoy being active).  It'll likely be worth far more to me than medical costs down the road. 

Though, with that said, I get the membership on discount at a sale that happens each year, I do it a year at a time, and I'm always open to and looking for alternatives - I'm able to justify it, but I'm always seeking better options.